licensed to get shared

As my http2 presentation is about to get its 16,000th viewer over at Slideshare I just have to take a moment and reflect over that fact.

Sixteen thousand viewers. I’ve uploaded slides there before over the years but no other presentation has gotten even close to this amount of attention even though some of them have been collecting views for years by now.

http2 presentation screenshot

I wrote my http2 explained document largely due to the popularity of my presentation and the stream of questions and curiosity that brought to life. Within just a couple of days, that 27 page document had been downloaded more than 2,000 times and by now over 5000 times. This is almost 7MB of PDF which I believe raises the bar for the ordinary casual browser to not download it without having an interest and intention to at least glance through it. Of course I realize a large portion of said downloads are never really read.

Someone suggested to me (possibly in jest) that I should convert these into ebooks and “charge 1 USD a piece to get some profit out of them”. I really won’t and I would have a struggle to do that. It has been said before but in my case it is indeed true: I stand on the shoulders of giants. I’ve just collected information and written down texts that mostly are ideas, suggestions and conclusions others have already made in various other forums, lists or documents. I wouldn’t feel right charging for that nor depriving anyone the rights and freedoms to create derivatives and continue building on what I’ve done. I’m just the curator and janitor here. Besides, I already have an awesome job at an awesome company that allows me to work full time on open source – every day.

The next phase started thanks to the open license. A friendly volunteer named Vladimir Lettiev showed up and translated the entire document into Russian and now suddenly the reach of the text is vastly expanded into a territory where it previously just couldn’t penetrate. With using people’s native languages, information can really trickle down to a much larger audience. Especially in regions that aren’t very Englishified.

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