The curl and libcurl 2014 survey

Thursday, June 19th, 2014

Reading through the answers to the curl project’s survey “curl and libcurl 2014″ is very interesting and educational.

After having lead and participated in this project for so long I have my own picture of what we’re good and bad at. That’s not exactly the same image I get when I read the survey responses. That’s of course the educating part and I really want to learn from this poll and see where to put in some efforts and attempt to improve. At the same time I’ve been working for a while to put together a roadmap for the project, and the survey will help guide us with that work as well.

The full generated summary of the answers can be found on the site, but I thought I do the extra effort here and try to extrapolate data, compare and try to get to the real story that lurks in the shadows.

Over the almost 10 days the poll was open, we received 194 responses. I was hoping for more participation, but on the other hand I don’t think more people would’ve given a much different view. My only concern would be that I’m not sure exactly how well we reached out.

Almost all curl users use it for HTTP and HTTPS. Sure, we also use a lot of other protocols and in fact all supported protocols did up having at least two users according to the survey, but only a single digit percentage did not mark HTTP and HTTPS as protocols they use. The least used supported protocol gopher, is used among 1.5% of the users who responded.

FTPS and SFTP are basically equally much used and they are the 4th and 5th most used protocols. HTTP, HTTPS and FTP are clearly our most popular protocols.

Only one in five users use curl on a single platform. All others use it on two or more, and one if four use it on four or more with an unexpectedly high 11% saying they use it on 5 or more platforms! That’s a pretty strong message to me that our multi-platform strategy is important.

Our users have been with us for a long time. Half of the users have been using curl for five years or more! A fifth has been with us for 8 years or more! And yet there seems to be a healthy amount of newcomers finding us as 14% is within their first year.

The above numbers combined, I’m not surprised but only happy to see that 4 out of 5 users are also involved in other open source projects. curl is just one piece in a large ecosystem and I think it is good that we all participate in several projects so that we learn and cross-pollinate where possible!

Less than half of the respondents are subscribed to a curl mailing list, and curl-library is the most popular one. This also reflects in subscriber numbers on the actual mailing lists where curl-library with its 1400+ members has almost twice as many subscribers as curl-users. One way to view this is that we are old enough, established enough and working enough so that users don’t have to subscribe to our lists to keep up. The less optimistic way to see it could be that this is because we haven’t reached out good enough or that our mailing list culture/setup isn’t welcoming enough.

Perhaps most surprising to me: that several persons got upset and reacted strongly to the question about how good we treat “female and other minorities” in the project. To me there’s no doubt that female contributors are a minority in the curl community and I want to learn if we’re doing our best to be inclusive and open to all possible contributors. Or at least how good/bad people think we are doing.

29% of the respondents have contributed patches, meaning 56 individuals. I think that tells more about the ones who took part of the survey than it measures participation level among “regular users”.

Documentation

A big revelation for me was the question where I asked people to identify the “worst parts” of the project. The image here below is the look of the summary.

It quite clearly identifies “documentation” as the area in most need of improvements.

I don’t think the amount of docs is the problem. After discussing with people I think the primary issues are:

  • Some collections of docs are just too big and hard to find in, like the curl man page and the curl_easy_setopt man pages. We need to split them up and/or rearrange somehow to help people find the info they need. Work has started on this. I’ll follow up with details later.
  • We get slightly bad “reviews” on this when people confuse the libcurl bindings’ lack of docs to be our problem. Lots of libcurl bindings are not very good documented – but they are separate projects not controlled or documented by us. I don’t know what we can do to help that situation. Suggestions are very welcome!
  • We don’t have much step-by-step tutorials on how to get started and how to knit things together. We mostly provide reference manuals. I will appreciate help with improving this!

cURL

I go Mozilla

Friday, December 20th, 2013

Mozilla dinosaur head logo

In January 2014, I start working for Mozilla

I’ve worked in open source projects for some 20 years and I’ve maintained curl and libcurl for over 15 years. I’m an internet protocol geek at heart and Mozilla seems like a perfect place for me to continue to explore this interest of mine and combine it with real open source in its purest form.

I plan to use my experiences from all my years of protocol fiddling and making stuff work on different platforms against random server implementations into the networking team at Mozilla and work on improving Firefox and more.

I’m putting my current embedded Linux focus to the side and I plunge into a worldwide known company with worldwide known brands to do open source within the internet protocols I enjoy so much. I’ll be working out of my home, just outside Stockholm Sweden. Mozilla has no office in my country and I have no immediate plans of moving anywhere (with a family, kids and all established here).

I intend to bring my mindset on protocols and how to do things well into the Mozilla networking stack and world and I hope and expect that I will get inspiration and input from Mozilla and take that back and further improve curl over time. My agreement with Mozilla also gives me a perfect opportunity to increase my commitment to curl and curl development. I want to maintain and possibly increase my involvement in IETF and the httpbis work with http2 and related stuff. With one foot in Firefox and one in curl going forward, I think I may have a somewhat unique position and attitude toward especially HTTP.

I’ve not yet met another Swedish Mozillian but I know I’m not the only one located in Sweden. I guess I now have a reason to look them up and say hello when suitable.

Björn and Linus will continue to drive and run Haxx with me taking a step back into the shadows (Haxx-wise). I’ll still be part of the collective Haxx just as I was for many years before I started working full-time for Haxx in 2009. My email address, my sites etc will remain on haxx.se.

I’m looking forward to 2014!

Always have everything proven to work

Wednesday, November 27th, 2013

… the slides from my talk today at Techdays by Init in Stockholm:

Always have everything proven to work from Daniel Stenberg

Rpi night in GBG

Thursday, November 21st, 2013

pelagicore logo

Daniel talking So I flew down to and participated at yet another embedded Linux hacking event that was also co-organized by me, that took place yesterday (November 20th 2013) in Gothenburg Sweden.

The event was hosted by Pelagicore in their nice downtown facilities and it was fully signed up with some 28 attendees.

I held a talk about the current situation of real-time and low latency in the Linux kernel, a variation of a talk I’ve done before and even if I have modified it since before you can still get the gist of it on this old slideshare upload. As you can see on the photo I can do hand-wavy gestures while talking! When I finally shut up, we were fed tasty sandwiches and there was some time to socialize and actually hack on some stuff.

Embedded Linux hackers in GBG

I then continued my tradition and held a contest. This time I did raise the complexity level a bit as I decided I wanted a game with more challenges and something that feels less like a quiz and more like a game or a maze. See my separate post for full details and for your chance to test your skills.

This event was also nicely synced in time with the recent introduction of the foss-gbg mailing list, which is an effort to gather people in the area that have an interest in Free and Open Source Software. Much in the same way foss-sthlm was made a couple of years ago.

Pelagicore also handed out 9 Raspberry Pis at the event to lucky attendees.

Embedded and Raspberry Pis in GBG

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

Kjell Ericson's blinking leds

On November 20, we’ll gather a bunch of interested people in the same room and talk embedded Linux, open source and related matters. I’ll do a talk about real-time in Linux and I’ll run a contest in the same spirit as I’ve done before several times.

Sign-up here!

Pelagicore is hosting and sponsoring everything. I’ll mostly just show up and do what I always do: talk a lot.

So if you live in the area and are into open source and possibly embedded, do show up and I can promise you a good time.

(The photo is actually taken during one of our previous embedded hacking events.)

source code survival rate

Tuesday, November 5th, 2013

The curl project has its roots in the late 1996, but we haven’t kept track of all of the early code history. We imported our code to Sourceforge late 1999 and that’s how far back we can see in our current git repository. The exact date is “Wed Dec 29 14:20:26 UTC 1999″. So, almost 14 years of development.

Warning: this blog post contains more useless info and graphs than many mortals can handle. Be aware!

How much old code remain in the current source tree? Or perhaps put differently: how is the refresh rate of the code? We fix bugs, we change things, we add features. Surely we’ll slowly over time rewrite the old code and replace it with new more shiny and better working code? I decided to check this. Here’s what I found!

The tools

We have all code in git. ‘git blame’ is the primary tool I used as it lists all lines of all source code and tells us when it was added. I did some additional perl scripting around it.

The code

I decided to check all code in the src/ and lib/ directories in the curl and libcurl source tree. The source code is used to create both the curl tool and the libcurl library and back in 1999 there was no libcurl like today so we do get a slightly better coverage of history this way.

In total this sums up to some 112000 lines in the current .c and .h files.

To count the total amount of commits done to those specific files through history I ran:

git log --oneline src/*.[ch] lib/*.[ch] | wc -l

6047 commits in total. (if I don’t specify the files and count all commits in the repo it ends up at 16954)

git stats

We run gitstats on the curl repo every day so you can go there for some more and current stats. Right now it tells us that average number of commits is 4.7 per active day (that means days when actually something was committed), or 3.4 per all days over the entire time. There was git activity 3576 days in total. By 224 authors.

Surviving commits

How much of the code would you think still remains that were present already that December day 1999?

How much of the code in the current code base would you think was written the last few years?

Commit vs Author vs Date

I wanted to see how much old code that exists, or perhaps how the age of the code is represented in the current code base. I decided to therefore base my logic on the author time that git tracks. It is basically the time when the author of a change commits it to his/her local tree as then the change can be applied later on by a committer that can be someone else, but the author time remains the same. Sometimes a committer commits multiple patches at once, possibly at a much later time etc so I figured the author time would be a better time stamp. I also decided to track the date instead of just the commit hash so that I can sort the changes properly and also make interesting graphs that are based on that time. I use the time with a second precision so changes done a second apart will be recorded as two separate changes while two commits done with the same author time stamp will be counted as the same time.

I had my script run ‘git blame –line-porcelain’ for all files and had my script sum up all changes done on the same time.

Some totals

The code base contains changes written at 4147 different times. Converted to UTC times, they happened on 2076 unique days. On 167 unique months. That’s every month since the beginning.

We’re talking about 312 files.

Number of lines changed over time

A graph with changes over time. The Y axis is number of lines that were changed on that particular time. (click for higher res)

Lines changed over time

Ok you object, that doesn’t look very appealing. So here’s the same data but with all the changes accumulated over time.

accumulated

Do you think the same as I do? Isn’t it strangely linear? It seems that the number of added lines that remain in the code today is virtually the same over time! But fair enough, the changes in the X axis are not distributed according to the time/date they represent so we shouldn’t be fooled by the time, but certainly we can see that changes in general only bring in a certain amount of surviving modified lines.

Another way to count the changes is then to check all the ~4000 change times of the present code, and see how many days between them there are:

delta

Ah, now finally we’re seeing something. Older code that is still present clearly was made with longer periods in between the changes that have lasted. It makes perfect sense to me, since the many years of development probably have later overwritten a lot of code that was written in between.

Also, it is clearly that among the more recent changes that have survived they were often done on the same day or just a few days away from another lasting change.

Grouped on date ranges

The number of modified lines split up on the individual year the change came in.

year

Interesting! The general trend is clear and not surprising. Two years stand out from the trend, 2004 and 2011. I have not yet investigated what particular larger changes that were made those years that have survived. The bump for 1999 is simply the original import and most of those lines are preprocessor lines like #ifdef and #include or just opening and closing braces { and }.

Splitting up the number of surviving lines on the specific year+month they were added:

month

This helps us analyze the previous chart. As we can see, the rather tall bars from 2004 and 2011 are actually several months wide and explains the bumps in the year-chart. Clearly we made some larger effort on those periods that were good enough to still remain in the code.

Correlate to added or removed lines?

So, can we perhaps see if some years’ more activity in number of added or removed source lines can be tracked back to explain the number of surviving source code lines? I ran “git diff [hash1]..[hash2] –stat — lib/*.[ch] src/*.[ch]” for all years to get a summary of number of added and removed source code lines that year. I added those number to the table with surviving lines and then I made another graph:

year-again

Funnily enough, we see almost an exact correlation there for the first eight years and then the pattern breaks. From the year 2009 the number of removed lines went down but still the amount of surving lines went up quite a bit and then the graphs jump around a bit.

My interpretation of this graph is this boring: the amount of surviving code in absolute numbers is clearly correlating to the amount of added code. And that we removed more code yearly in the 2000-2003 period than what has survived.

But notice how the blue line is closing the gap to the orange/red one over time, which means that percentage wise there’s more surviving code in more recent code! How much?

Here’s the amount of surviving lines/added lines and a second graph looking at surviving lines/(added + removed) to see if the mere source code activity would be a more suitable factor to compare against…

relation survival vs added and removed lines

Code committed within the last 5 years are basically 75% left but then it goes downhill down to the 18% survival rate of the 1999 code import.

If you can think of other good info to dig out, let me know!

1999,1699
2000,1115
2001,3061
2002,2432
2003,2578
2004,7644
2005,4016
2006,5101
2007,7665
2008,7292
2009,9460
2010,11762
2011,19642
2012,11842
2013,16844

he forked off libgnurl

Sunday, October 27th, 2013

Everyone and anyone is of course entitled to fork a project that is released under an open source license. This goes for my projects as well and I don’t mind it. Go ahead.

I think it may be a bit shortsighted and a stupid decision, but open source allows this and it sometimes actually lead to goodness.

libgnurl

Enter libgnurl. A libcurl fork created by Christian Grothoff.

For most applications, the more obscure protocols supported by cURL are close to dead code — mostly harmless, but not useful

<sarcasm>Of course a libcurl newcomer such Christian knows exactly what “most applications” want and need and thus what’s useful to them….</sarcasm>

cURL supports a bunch of crypto backends. In practice, only the OpenSSL, NSS (RedHat) and GnuTLS (Debian) variants seem to see widespread deployment

Originally he mentioned only OpenSSL and GnuTLS there until someone pointed out the massive amount of NSS users and then the page got updated. Quite telling I think. Lots of windows users these days use the schannel backend, Mac OS X users use the darwinssl backend and so on. Again statements based on his view and opinions and most probably without any closer checks done or even attempted.

As a side-node we could discuss what importance (perceived) “widespread deployment” has when selecting what to support or not, but let’s save that for another blog post a rainy day.

there exist examples of code that deadlocks on IPC if cURL is linked against OpenSSL while it works fine with GnuTLS

I can’t argue against something I don’t know about. I’m not aware of any bug reports on something like this. libcurl is not fully SSL layer agnostic, the SSL library choice “leaks” through to applications so yes an application can very well be written to be “forced” to use a libcurl built against a particular backend.  That doesn’t seem what he’s complaining about here though.

Thus, application developers have to pray that the cURL version deployed by the distribution is compatible with their needs

Application developers that use a library – any library – surely always hope that it is compatible with their needs!?

it is also rather difficult to replace cURL for normal users if cURL is compiled in the wrong way

Is it really? As most autotools based projects, you just run configure –prefix=blablalba and install a separate build in a customer directory and then use that for your special-need projects. I suppose he means something else. I don’t know what.

For GNUnet, we need a modern version of GnuTLS. How modern? Well, while I write this, it hasn’t been released yet (update: the release has now happened, the GnuTLS guys are fast). So what happens if one tries to link cURL against this version of GnuTLS?

To verify his claims that building against the most recent gnutls is tricky, I tried:

  1. download 3.2.5 tarball
  2. unpack it
  3. configure –prefix=$HOME/build-gnutls-3.2.5
  4. make
  5. make install
  6. cd [curl source tree]
  7. configure –without-ssl –with-gnutls=$HOME/build-gnutls-3.2.5 [and some more options if wanted]
  8. make
  9. invoke “./src/curl -V” to verify that the build is using the latest. Yes it does. Case closed.

How does forking fix it? Easy. First, we can get rid of all of the compatibility issues

That’s of course hard to argue with. If you introduce a brand new library it won’t have any compatibility issues since nobody used it before. Kind of shortsighted solution though, since as soon as someone starts to use it then compatibility becomes something to pay attention to.

Also, since Christian is talking about doing some changes to accomplish this new grand state, I suspect he will do this by breaking compatibility with libcurl in some aspects and then gnurl won’t be libcurl compatible so it will no longer be that easy to switch between them as desired.

Note that this pretty much CANNOT be done without a fork, as renaming is an essential part of the fix.

Is renaming the produced library really that hard to do without forking the project? If I want to produce a renamed output from an open source project out there, I apply a script or hack the makefile of that project and I keep that script or diff in my end. No fork needed. I think I must’ve misunderstood some subtle angle of this…

Now, there might be creative solutions to achieve the same thing within the standard cURL build system, but I’m not happy to wait for a decade for Daniel to review the patches.

Why would he need to send me such patches in the first place? Why would I have to review the patches? Why would we merge them?

That final paragraph is probably the most telling of his entire page. I think he did this entire fork because he is unhappy with the lack of speed in the reviewing and responses to his patches he’s sent to the libcurl mailing list. He’s publicly complained and whined about it several times. A very hostile attitude to actually get the help or review you want.

I want to note that the main motiviations for this fork are technical

Yes sure, they are technical but also based on misunderstandings and just lack of will.

But I like to stress again that I don’t mind the fork. I just mind the misinformation and the statements made as if they were true and facts and represents what we stand for in the actual curl project.

I believe in collaboration. I try to review patches and provide feedback as soon as I can. I wish Christian every success with gnurl.

Don’t email me

Tuesday, October 8th, 2013

Why I insist on people to keep issues on the mailing list(s)

A recent twitter discussion I had with Andrei Neculau contributed to his blog post on this subject, basically arguing that I’m wrong but with many words and explanations.

It triggered me to write up my primary reasons for why I strongly object to handle open source issues, questions and patches privately (for free) in open source projects that I have a leading role in.

1. I spend a considerable amount of my spare time on open source projects. I devote some 15-20 unpaid hours a week for those communities. By emailing me and insisting on a PRIVATE conversation you’re suddenly yanking the mutex flag and you’re now requesting that I spend parts of this time on YOU ALONE and not the rest of the community. That’s selfish.

2. By insisting on a private conversation you FORCE me to repeat myself since ideas and questions are rarely unique or done for the first time. So you have a problem or a question that’s very similar to one I just responded to. And the next person will ask the same one tomorrow. By insisting on doing them in public already in the first email, already the second person can read it without me having to write it twice. And the third person who didn’t even realize he was interested in that topic will find out and read it as well (either now when the mail gets sent out or even years later when that user find the archived mailing list on the web). Private emails deny that ability. That’s selfish.

3. By emailing me privately and asking questions and help, you assume that I am the single best person to ask this question at this given time. What if I happen to be on vacation, be under a rough period at work or just not know the particular area of the project very good. I may be the leader or a public person of a project, but I may still not know much about feature X for operating system Z about which you ask. Ask on the list at once and you’ll reach the correct person. That’s more efficient.

4. By emailing me privately, you indirectly put a load on me to reply – or to get off as a rude person. Yes you’re friendly and you ask me nicely and yet even after you remind me after a few days I STILL DON’T RESPOND. Even if I just worked five 16-hour work days and you asked questions I don’t know the answer to… That’s inefficient and rude.

5. Using pull requests on github? That could’ve been good if github would’ve been better. Right now, posting a pull request will only send that to the few persons who are listed as “collaborators” for that repository – which may reach more than a single person so it still better than to a private person but on the mailing list there may be THOUSANDS of people that can read and comment and provide feedback on patches and issues. That’s inefficient and forces OTHERS to have to do the work instead and forward stuff to the list.

6. Yes, you can say that subscribing to an email list can be daunting and flood you with hundreds or thousands of emails per month – that’s completely true. But if you only wanted to send that single question or submit the single issue, then you can unsubscribe again quite soon and escape most of that load. Then YOU do the work instead of demanding someone else to do it for you. When you want to handle a SINGLE issue, it is much better load balancing if you do the extra work and the people who do tens or HUNDREDS of issues per month in the project do less work per issue.

7. You’re suggesting that I could forward the private question to the mailing list? Yes I can, but then I need to first ask for permission to do so (or be a jerk) and if the person who sent me the mail is going to send me another mail anyway, (s)he can just as well spend that time to send the first mail to the list instead of say YES to me and then make me do his or hers work. It’s just more efficient. Also, forwarded questions tend to end up so that replies and follow-up questions don’t find their way back to the original poster and that’s bad.

8. I propose and use different lists for different purposes to ease the problem with too many (uninteresting) emails.

Meet Haxx at FOSDEM 2013

Sunday, November 4th, 2012

Keeping up with our fine tradition, we will be present at that huge open source conference called FOSDEM in Brussels Belgium at the beginning of February 2013. It will then become our… 4th (?) visit there. I don’t have any talk planned yet, but possibly I’ll suggest something later.

Fosdem is several thousand open source geeks in a massive scale conference with something like twenty different parallel tracks, where each room basically is organized and planned independently. There’s no registration and no entrance fee. I usually enjoy network and security related rooms and of course the embedded room, which unfortunately seems to be stuck in a very large room of the campus with the worst sound system and audio conditions…

I look forward to meet friends there and have a great time with open source talks and good Belgian beers at night! If you’ll be there too, let us know and we can meet up.

fosdem

Embedded Linux hacking day

Monday, October 22nd, 2012

eneaOn September 10th, I sent out the invite to the foss-sthlm community for an embedded hacking event just before lunch. In just four hours, the 40 available tickets had been claimed and the waiting list started to get filled up as well… I later increased the amount to 46, we had some cancellations and I handed out more tickets and we had 46 people signed up at the day of the event (I believe 3 of these didn’t show up). At the day the event started, we still had another 20 people in the waiting list with hopes of getting a spot!

(All photos in this post are scaled down versions, click the picture to see a slightly higher resolution version!)

In Enea we had found an excellent sponsor for this event. They provided the place, the food, the raspberry pis, the coffe, the tshirts, the infrastructure and everything else that had to be there to make it an awesome day.

the-roomWe started off the event at 10:00 on October 20 in the Enea offices in Kista, Stockholm Sweden. People dropped in one by one and were handed their welcome present containing a raspberry pi board, a 2GB SD card and a USB-to-serial cable to interface/power the board with. People then found their seats in the room.

There were fruit, candy, water and coffee to start off and keep the mood high. We experienced some initial wifi and internet access problems but luckily we had no less than two dedicated Enea IT support people present and they could swiftly fix the little hiccups that occurred.

coffee machines

Once everyone seemed to have landed, I welcomed everyone and just gave a short overview of what to expect from the day, where the toilets are and so on.

In order to try to please everyone who couldn’t be with us at this event, due to plans or due to simply not having got one of the attractive 40 “tickets”, Björn the cameramanEnea helped us arrange a video camera which we used during the entire day to film all talks and the contest. I can’t promise any delivery time for them but I’ll work on getting them made public as soon as possible. I’ll make a separate blog post when there’s something to see. (All talks were in Swedish!)

At 11:30 I started off the day for real by holding the first presentation. We used one of the conference rooms for this, just next to the big room where everyone say hacking. This day we had removed all tables and only had chairs in the room movie theater style and it turned out we could fit just about all attendees in the room this way. I think that was good as I think almost everyone sat down to hear and see me:

Open Source in Embedded Systems

daniel talks open source I did a rather non-technical talk about a couple of trends in the embedded operating systems market and how I see the upcoming future and then some additional numbers etc. The full presentation (with most of the text in Swedish) can be found on slideshare.

I got good questions and I think it turned out an interesting discussion on how things run and work these days.

After my talk (which I of course did longer than planned) we served lunch. Three different sallads, bread and stuff were brought out. Several people approached me to say how they appreciated the food so I must say that Enea managed really well on that account too!

Development and trends in multicore CPUs

jonas talks about CPUs
Jonas Svennebring from Freescale was up next and talked about current multicore CPU development trends and what the challenges are for the manufacturers are today. It was a very good and very technical talk and he topped it off by showing off his board with T4240 running, Freecale’s latest flagship chip that is just now about to become available for companies outside of Freescale.

T4240 from FreeescaleOn this photo on the left you see the power supply in the foreground and the ATX board with a huge fan and cooler on top of the actual T4240 chip.

T4240 is claimed to have a new world record in coremark performance, features 12 hyper-threaded ppc cores in up to 1.8GHz.

There were some good questions to Jonas and he delivered good and well thought out answers. Then people walked out in the big room again to continue getting some actual hacking done.

We then took the opportunity to hand out the very nice-looking tshirts to all attendees, again kindly done so by Enea.

The Contest

The next interruption was the contest. Designed entirely by me to allow everyone to participate, even my friends and Enea employees etc. On the photo on the right you can see I now wear the tshirt of the day.

the contest
The contest was hard. I knew it was hard as I wanted it really make it a race that was only for the ones who really get embedded linux and have their brain laid out properly!

I posted the entire contest in separate blog post, but the gist of it was that I presented 16 questions with 3 answer alternatives. Each alternative had a sequence of letters. So after 16 questions you had 16 letter sequences you had to put in the right order to get a 17th question. The first one to give a correct answer to that 17th question would win.

A whole bunch of people gave up immediately but there was a core group who really fought hard, long and bravely and in the end we got a winner. The winner had paired up so the bottle of champagne went jointly to Klas and Jonas. It was a very close call as others were within seconds of figuring it out too.

I think the competition was harder than I thought. Possibly a little too hard…

Your own code on others’ hardware

linus talksLinus from Haxx (who shouldn’t be much of a stranger to readers of this blog) then gave some insights on how he reversed engineered mp3 players for the Rockbox project. Reverse engineering is a subject that attracts many people and I believe it has some sort of magic aura around it. Again many good questions and interested people in the room.

Linus bare targets as seen during his talk On the photo on the right you can see Linus’ stripped down hardware which he explained he had ripped off all components from in order to properly hunt down how things were connected on the PCB.

Coffee

We did not keep the time schedule so we had to get the coffee break in after Linus, and there were buns and so on.

Yocto

Björn from Haxx then educated the room on the Yocto Project. What it is, why it is, who it is and a little about how it is designed and how it works etc.

bjorn talks on yocto

I think perhaps people started to get a little soft in their brain as we had now blasted through all but one of the talks, and as a speaker finale we had Henrik…

u-boot on Allwinner A10

Henrik Nordström did a walk-through explaining some u-boot basics and then explained what he had done for the Allwinner targets and related info.

Henrik talks u-boot
I believe the talks were kind of the glue that made people stick around. Once Henrik was done and there was no more talks planned for the day, it was obvious that it was sort of the signal for people to start calling it a day even though there was still over one hour left until the official end time (20:00).

Henriks hardware
Of course I don’t blame anyone for that. I had hardly had any time myself to sit down or do anything relaxing during the day so I was kind of exhausted myself…

Summary

I got a lot of very positive comments from people when they left the facilities with big smiles on their faces, asking for more of these sorts of events in the future.

The back of the Enea tshirtI am very happy with the overly positive response, with the massive interest from our community to come to such an event and again, Enea was an awesome sponsor for this.

Talk audienceI didn’t get anything done on the raspberry pi during this day. As a matter of fact I never even got around to booting my board, but I figure that wasn’t a top priority for me this day.

The crowd size felt really perfect for these facilities and 40 something also still keeps the spirit of familiarity and it doesn’t feel like a “big” event or so.

Will I work on making another event similar to this again? Sure. It might not happen immediately, but I don’t see why it can’t be made again under similar circumstances.

Credits

rpi accessed with tabletAll photos on this page were taken by me, Björn Stenberg, Kjell Ericson, Mats Lidell and Mia Åkerström.

Thanks to Jonas, Björn, Linus and Henrik for awesome talks.

Thanks to Enea for sponsoring this event, and Mia then in particular for being a good organizer.