Tag Archives: curlup

curl cheat sheet refresh

Several years ago I made a first version of a “curl HTTP cheat sheet” to facilitate the most common curl command line options when working with HTTP.

This has now been refreshed after I took lots of feedback from friends on twitter, and then worked on rearranging the lines and columns so that it got as compact as possible without sacrificing readability (too much).

See the updated online version here.

The curl HTTP cheat sheet, 2020 edition.

The plan is to make stickers out of this – and possibly t-shirts as well. I did some test prints and deemed that with a 125 mm width, all the text is still clearly readable.

If things go well, I’ll hand out these beauties at curl up 2020 and of course leftovers will then be given away to whoever I run into at other places and conferences where I bring stickers…

You’re invited to curl up 2020: Berlin

The annual curl developers conference, curl up, is being held in Berlin this year; May 9-10 2020.

Starting now, you can register to the event to be sure that you have a seat. The number of available seats is limited.

Register here

curl up is the main (and only?) event of the year where curl developers and enthusiasts get together physically in a room for a full weekend of presentations and discussions on topics that are centered around curl and its related technologies.

We move the event around to different countries every year to accommodate different crowds better and worse every year – and this time we’re back again in Germany – where we once started the curl up series back in 2017.

The events are typically small with a very friendly spirit. 20-30 persons

Sign up

We will only be able to let you in if you have registered – and received a confirmation. There’s no fee – but if you register and don’t show, you lose karma.

The curl project can even help fund your travel and accommodation expenses (if you qualify). We really want curl developers to come!

Register here

Date

May 9-10 2020. We’ll run the event both days of that weekend.

Agenda

The program is not done yet and will not be so until just a week or two before the event, and then it will be made available => here.

We want as many voices as possible to be heard at the event. If you have done something with curl, want to do something with curl, have a suggestion etc – even just short talk will be much appreciated. Or if you have a certain topic or subject you really want someone else to speak about, let us know as well!

Expect topics to be about curl, curl internals, Internet protocols, how to improve curl, what to not do in curl and similar.

Location

We’ll be in the co.up facilities in central Berlin. On Adalbertstraße 8.

Planning and discussions on curl-meet

Everything about the event, planning for it, volunteering, setting it up, agenda bashing and more will be done on the curl-meet mailing list, dedicated for this purpose. Join in!

The Stockholm edition.

Anti Google?

If you have a problem with filling in the Google-hosted registration form, please email us at curlup@haxx.se instead and we’ll ask you for the information over email instead.

Credits

The images were taken by me, Daniel. The top one at the Nuremburg curl up in 2017, the in-article photo in Stockholm 2018.

curl up 2019 is over

(I will update this blog post with more links to videos and PDFs to presentations as they get published, so come back later in case your favorite isn’t linked already.)

The third curl developers conference, curl up 2019, is how history. We gathered in the lovely Charles University in central Prague where we sat down in an excellent class room. After the HTTP symposium on the Friday, we spent the weekend to dive in deeper in protocols and curl details.

I started off the Saturday by The state of the curl project (youtube). An overview of how we’re doing right now in terms of stats, graphs and numbers from different aspects and then something about what we’ve done the last year and a quick look at what’s not do good and what we could work on going forward.

James Fuller took the next session and his Newbie guide to contributing to libcurl presentation. Things to consider and general best practices to that could make your first steps into the project more likely to be pleasant!

Long term curl hacker Dan Fandrich (also known as “Daniel two” out of the three Daniels we have among our top committers) followed up with Writing an effective curl test where the detailed what different tests we have in curl, what they’re for and a little about how to write such tests.

Sign seen at the curl up dinner reception Friday night

After that I was back behind the desk in the classroom that we used for this event and I talked The Deprecation of legacy crap (Youtube). How and why we are removing things, some things we are removing and will soon remove and finally a little explainer on our new concept and handling of “experimental” features.

Igor Chubin then explained his new protect for us: curlator: a framework for console services (Youtube). It’s a way and tooling that makes it easier to provide access to shell and console oriented services over the web, using curl.

Me again. Governance, money in the curl project and someone offering commercial support (Youtube) was a presentation about how we intend for the project to join a legal entity SFC, and a little about money we have, what to spend it on and how I feel it is good to keep the project separate from any commercial support ventures any of us might do!

While the list above might seems like more than enough, the day wasn’t over. Christian Schmitz also did his presentation on Using SSL root certificate from Mac/Windows.

Our local hero organizer James Fuller then spoiled us completely when we got around to have dinner at a monastery with beer brewing monks and excellent food. Good food, good company and curl related dinner subjects. That’s almost heaven defined!

Sunday

Daylight saving time morning and you could tell. I’m sure it was not at all related to the beers from the night before…

James Fuller fired off the day by talking to us about Curlpipe (github), a DSL for building http execution pipelines.

The class room we used for the curl up presentations and discussions during Saturday and Sunday.

Robin Marx then put in the next gear and entertained us another hour with a protocol deep dive titled HTTP/3 (QUIC): the details (slides). For me personally this was a exactly what I needed as Robin clearly has kept up with more details and specifics in the QUIC and HTTP/3 protocols specifications than I’ve managed and his talk help the rest of the room get at least little bit more in sync with current development.

Jakub Nesetril and Lukáš Linhart from Apiary then talked us through what they’re doing and thinking around web based APIs and how they and their customers use curl: Real World curl usage at Apiary.

Then I was up again and I got to explain to my fellow curl hackers about HTTP/3 in curl. Internal architecture, 3rd party libs and APIs.

Jakub Klímek explained to us in very clear terms about current and existing problems in his talk IRIs and IDNs: Problems of non-ASCII countries. Some of the problems involve curl and while most of them have their clear explanations, I think we have to lessons to learn from this: URLs are still as messy and undocumented as ever before and that we might have some issues to fix in this area in curl.

To bring my fellow up to speed on the details of the new API introduced the last year I then made a presentation called The new URL API.

Clearly overdoing it for a single weekend, I then got the honors of doing the last presentation of curl up 2019 and for an audience that were about to die from exhaustion I talked Internals. A walk-through of the architecture and what libcurl does when doing a transfer.

Summary

I ended up doing seven presentations during this single weekend. Not all of them stellar or delivered with elegance but I hope they were still valuable to some. I did not steal someone else’s time slot as I would gladly have given up time if we had other speakers wanted to say something. Let’s aim for more non-Daniel talkers next time!

A weekend like this is such a boost for inspiration, for morale and for my ego. All the friendly faces with the encouraging and appreciating comments will keep me going for a long time after this.

Thank you to our awesome and lovely event sponsors – shown in the curl up logo below! Without you, this sort of happening would not happen.

curl up 2020

I will of course want to see another curl up next year. There are no plans yet and we don’t know where to host. I think it is valuable to move it around but I think it is even more valuable that we have a friend on the ground in that particular city to help us out. Once this year’s event has sunken in properly and a month or two has passed, the case for and organization of next year’s conference will commence. Stay tuned, and if you want to help hosting us do let me know!


The future of HTTP Symposium

This year’s version of curl up started a little differently: With an afternoon of HTTP presentations. The event took place the same week the IETF meeting has just ended here in Prague so we got the opportunity to invite people who possibly otherwise wouldn’t have been here… Of course this was only possible thanks to our awesome sponsors, visible in the image above!

Lukáš Linhart from Apiary started out with “Web APIs: The Past, The Present and The Future”. A journey trough XML-RPC, SOAP and more. One final conclusion might be that we’re not quite done yet…

James Fuller from MarkLogic talked about “The Defenestration of Hypermedia in HTTP”. How HTTP web technologies have changed over time while the HTTP paradigms have survived since a very long time.

I talked about DNS-over-HTTPS. A presentation similar to the one I did before at FOSDEM, but in a shorter time so I had to talk a little faster!

Mike Bishop from Akamai (editor of the HTTP/3 spec and a long time participant in the HTTPbis work) talked about “The evolution of HTTP (from HTTP/1 to HTTP/3)” from HTTP/0.9 to HTTP/3 and beyond.

Robin Marx then rounded off the series of presentations with his tongue in cheek “HTTP/3 (QUIC): too big to fail?!” where we provided a long list of challenges for QUIC and HTTP/3 to get deployed and become successful.

We ended this afternoon session with a casual Q&A session with all the presenters discussing various aspects of HTTP, the web, REST, APIs and the benefits and deployment challenges of QUIC.

I think most of us learned things this afternoon and we could leave the very elegant Charles University room enriched and with more food for thoughts about these technologies.

We ended the evening with snacks and drinks kindly provided by Apiary.

(This event was not streamed and not recorded on video, you had to be there in person to enjoy it.)


curl up 2019 will happen in Prague

The curl project is happy to invite you to the city of Prague, the Czech Republic, where curl up 2019 will take place.

curl up is our annual curl developers conference where we gather and talk Internet protocols, curl’s past, current situation and how to design its future. A weekend of curl.

Previous years we’ve gathered twenty-something people for an intimate meetup in a very friendly atmosphere. The way we like it!

In a spirit to move the meeting around to give different people easier travel, we have settled on the city of Prague for 2019, and we’ll be there March 29-31.

Sign up now!

Symposium on the Future of HTTP

This year, we’re starting off the Friday afternoon with a Symposium dedicated to “the future of HTTP” which is aimed to be less about curl and more about where HTTP is and where it will go next. Suitable for a slightly wider audience than just curl fans.

That’s Friday the 29th of March, 2019.

Program and talks

We are open for registrations and we would love to hear what you would like to come and present for us – on the topics of HTTP, of curl or related matters. I’m sure I will present something too, but it becomes a much better and more fun event if we distribute the talking as much as possible.

The final program for these days is not likely to get set until much later and rather close in time to the actual event.

The curl up 2019 wiki page is where you’ll find more specific details appear over time. Just go back there and see.

Helping out and planning?

If you want to follow the planning, help out, offer improvements or you have questions on any of this? Then join the curl-meet mailing list, which is dedicated for this!

Free or charge thanks to sponsors

We’re happy to call our event free, or “almost free” of charge and we can do this only due to the greatness and generosity of our awesome sponsors. This year we say thanks to Mullvad, Sticker Mule, Apiary and Charles University.

There’s still a chance for your company to help out too! Just get in touch.

curl up 2019 with logos

curl up 2018 summary

curl up 2018

The event that occurred this past weekend was the second time we gathered a bunch of curl enthusiasts and developers in the same physical room to discuss the past, the present and the future from a curl perspective.

Stockholm, Sweden, was the center of gravity this time when Goto 10 hosted our merry collective. Spring has finally arrived here and as the sun was out a lot, it made it a lovely weekend weather wise too. As a bonus, the little coffee shop on the premises was open all through both days. Just for us!

This time we were 22 peeps coming in from Sweden, Germany, UK, Spain, the US, and Czechia.

This is what it looked like (photos by me):

Talks

We had a bunch of presentations over the two days, done by a bunch of people. I recorded the screens and recorded the voice on most of them, and they’re available online. (Apologies for only recording a part of the screen for many of them!)

The talks were around how things work in curl or in the curl project, how people have used curl and a bit about upcoming technologies that we hope to get curl to support (soon?): QUIC, DOH, Alt-Svc, tests, CI, proxies, libcurl in Apache, using curl on a CDN, fuzzing curl, parsing email with curl etc.

Quiz

We rounded off the Saturday with a twelve question curl quiz. The winner, Fernando, managed to hit the right answer in 8 questions and did it faster than the competition. He got himself a signed copy of Everything curl the second print edition as a prize!

Sponsors

46 Elks was graciously sponsoring us with awesome food and t-shirts.

Sticker Mule provided us with stickers.

Goto 10 let us occupy their place during the weekend when it is otherwise closed!

This event was possible only thanks to their help!

2019

Several people asked me about next year already. I certainly hope we can run another curl up in 2019, but I don’t know yet where this should happen. Ideally, I would like to move it around to different countries to give different people the ability to show up easier, but I also value having a local “host” that can provide the room and facilities for us. I’ll send out probing questions about the 2019 location later this year. If you have a usable office or another suitable place that could host us, (preferably outside of Germany or Sweden), feel most welcome and encouraged to contact me!

(me, photographed by Christian Schmitz)

Time’s up to shut up and sign up for curl up

We have just opened up the registration site for curl up 2018, the annual curl developers meeting that this year takes place in Stockholm, Sweden, over the weekend April 14-15. There’s a limited number of seats available, so if you want to join in the fun it might be a good idea to decide early on.

Sign up!

Also, to get into the proper curl up spirit, here’s the curl quiz we ran last year. I hope to run something similar again this year, but of course with a different set of questions.

The curl year 2017

I’m about to take an extended vacation for the rest of the year and into the beginning of the next, so I decided I’d sum up the year from a curl angle already now, a few weeks early. (So some numbers will grow a bit more after this post.)

2017

So what did we do this year in the project, how did curl change?

The first curl release of the year was version 7.53.0 and the last one was 7.57.0. In the separate blog posts on 7.55.0, 7.56.0 and 7.57.0 you’ll note that we kept up adding new goodies and useful features. We produced a total of 9 releases containing 683 bug fixes. We announced twelve security problems. (Down from 24 last year.)

At least 125 different authors wrote code that was merged into curl this year, in the 1500 commits that were made. We never had this many different authors during a single year before in the project’s entire life time! (The 114 authors during 2016 was the previous all-time high.)

We added more than 160 new names to the THANKS document for their help in improving curl. The total amount of contributors is now over 1660.

This year we truly started to use travis for CI builds and grew from a mere two builds per commit and PR up to nineteen (with additional ones run on appveyor and elsewhere). The current build set is a very good verification that that most things still compile and work after a PR is merged. (see also the testing curl article).

Mozilla announced that they too will use colon-slash-slash in their logo. Of course we all know who had it that in their logo first… =)

 

In March 2017, we had our first ever curl get-together as we arranged curl up 2017 a weekend in Nuremberg, Germany. It was very inspiring and meeting parts of the team in real life was truly a blast. This was so good we intend to do it again: curl up 2018 will happen.

curl turned 19 years old in March. In May it surpassed 5,000 stars on github.

Also in May, we moved over the official curl site (and my personal site) to get hosted by Fastly. We were beginning to get problems to handle the bandwidth and load, and in one single step all our worries were graciously taken care of!

We got curl entered into the OSS-fuzz project, and Max Dymond even got a reward from Google for his curl-fuzzing integration work and thanks to that project throwing heaps of junk at libcurl’s APIs we’ve found and fixed many issues.

The source code (for the tool and library only) is now at about 143,378 lines of code. It grew around 7,057 lines during the year. The primary reasons for the code growth were:

  1. the new libssh-powered SSH backend (not yet released)
  2. the new mime API (in 7.56.0) and
  3. the new multi-SSL backend support (also in 7.56.0).

Your maintainer’s view

Oh what an eventful year it has been for me personally.

The first interim meeting for QUIC took place in Japan, and I participated from remote. After all, I’m all set on having curl support QUIC and I’ll keep track of where the protocol is going! I’ve participated in more interim meetings after that, all from remote so far.

I talked curl on the main track at FOSDEM in early February (and about HTTP/2 in the Mozilla devroom). I’ve then followed that up and have also had the pleasure to talk in front of audiences in Stockholm, Budapest, Jönköping and Prague through-out the year.

 

I went to London and “represented curl” in the third edition of the HTTP workshop, where HTTP protocol details were discussed and disassembled, and new plans for the future of HTTP were laid out.

 

In late June I meant to go to San Francisco to a Mozilla “all hands” conference but instead I was denied to board the flight. That event got a crazy amount of attention and I received massive amounts of love from new and old friends. I have not yet tried to enter the US again, but my plan is to try again in 2018…

I wrote and published my h2c tool, meant to help developers convert a set of HTTP headers into a working curl command line.

The single occasion that overshadows all other events and happenings for me this year by far, was without doubt when I was awarded the Polhem Prize and got a gold medal medal from no other than his majesty the King of Sweden himself. For all my work and years spent on curl no less.

Not really curl related, but in November I was also glad to be part of the huge Firefox Quantum release. The biggest Firefox release ever, and one that has been received really well.

I’ve managed to commit over 800 changes to curl through the year, which is 54% of the totals and more commits than I’ve done in curl during a single year since 2005 (in which I did 855 commits). I explain this increase mostly on inspiration from curl up and the prize, but I think it also happened thanks to excellent feedback and motivation brought by my fellow curl hackers.

We’re running towards the end of 2017 with me being the individual who did most commits in curl every single month for the last 28 months.

2018?

More things to come!

curl up in Stockholm 2018

Welcome all curl hackers and fans to Stockholm 2018! We are hosting the curl up developers conference April 14-15 2018 in my home city in what now might really become an annual tradition. Remember Nuremberg 2017?

All details are collected and updated on the curl up 2018 wiki page:

curl-up-2018

curl up 2018  will be another two full days event over a weekend and we will make an effort to keep the attendance fee at a minimum.

Presentations by core curl contributors on how things work, what we’ve done lately, what we’re working on how, what we should work on in the future and blue-sky visions about what curl should become when it grows up. Everyone attending are encouraged to present something. All this, mixed with lots of discussions, Q&As and socializing.

This time, I hope you will also have the chance to arrive early and spend the Friday, or a part of it, working hands-on with other curl developers on actual programming/debugging curl features or bugs. The curl-hacking-Friday? While not firmly organized yet, I’d like to see this become reality. Let me know if that’s something you’d be interested to participate on.

Who should come?

Anyone interested in curl, curl development or how to best use curl in application or solutions. Here’s your chance to learn a lot and an excellent opportunity to influence the future of curl. And to get some short glimpses of a spring-time Stockholm when going back and forth to the curl up venue!

Sign up?

We will open up the “ticket booth” in January/February 2018, so just keep your eyes and ears open and you won’t miss it! The general idea is to keep the fee at a minimum, ideally zero. Currently the exact price depends on how we manage to cover the remaining costs with friendly sponsors.

Sponsor us!

We are looking for sponsors. If your company is interested and willing to help us out, in any capacity, please contact me! Remember that our project has no funds of its own and we have no particular company backing.

Where in Stockholm exactly?

We will spend the curl up 2018 weekend at Goto 10, which is near both the Skanstull and Gullmarsplan subway stations.

Action photo from curl up 2017 when Kamil Dudka spoke about Redhat’s use of curl built with NSS.