Tag Archives: localhost

localhost hack on Windows

There's no place like 127.0.0.1Readers of my blog and friends in general know that I’m not really a Windows guy. I never use it and I never develop things explicitly for windows – but I do my best in making sure my portable code also builds and runs on windows. This blog post is about a new detail that I’ve just learned and that I think I could help shed the light on, to help my fellow hackers. The other day I was contacted by a user of libcurl because he was using it on Windows and he noticed that when wanting to transfer data from the loopback device (where he had a service of his own), and he accessed it using “localhost” in the URL passed to libcurl, he would spot a DNS request for the address of that host name while when he used regular windows tools he would not see that! After some mails back and forth, the details got clear:

Windows has a default /etc/hosts version (conveniently instead put at “c:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc\hosts”) and that default  /etc/hosts alternative used to have an entry for “localhost” in it that would point to 127.0.0.1.

When Windows 7 was released, Microsoft had removed the localhost entry from the /etc/hosts file. Reading sources on the net, it might be related to them supporting IPv6 for real but it’s not at all clear what the connection between those two actions would be.

getaddrinfo() in Windows has since then, and it is unclear exactly at which point in time it started to do this, been made to know about the specific string “localhost” and is documented to always return “all loopback addresses on the local computer”.

So, a custom resolver such as c-ares that doesn’t use Windows’ functions to resolve names but does it all by itself, that has been made to look in the /etc/host file etc now suddenly no longer finds “localhost” in a local file but ends up asking the DNS server for info about it… A case that is far from ideal. Most servers won’t have an entry for it and others might simply provide the wrong address.

I think we’ll have to give in and provide this hack in c-ares as well, just the way Windows itself does.

Oh, and as a bonus there’s even an additional hack mentioned in the getaddrinfo docs: On Windows Server 2003 and later if the pNodeName parameter points to a string equal to “..localmachine”, all registered addresses on the local computer are returned.

Add latency to localhost

Pádraig Brady taught me a great trick in a comment to a previous blog post and it was so neat I feel a need to highlight it further as it also makes it easier for me to find it again later!

To simulate a far away server, add RTT time to the localhost device. For example if we add 100 milliseconds (which then makes 200ms ping time to localhost):

$ tc qdisc add dev lo root handle 1:0 netem delay 100msec
Restore it back to normal again with:
$ tc qdisc del dev lo root
tc qdisc add dev lo root handle 1:0 netem delay 100msec

Restore it back to normal again with:

tc qdisc del dev lo root

Windows localhost slowness

A client of mine and myself ran a bunch of tests doing FTP and SFTP transfers against localhost to measure how fast our custom solution is compared to a set of existing solutions.

The specific results from this aren’t what caught my eyes, mostly because they’re currently still only used for comparisons and to measure relative improvements, but it was instead the relative speed differences between the tests run on Mac 10.5.5, on Windows XP SP3 and on Linux 2.6.26.

Some of the Windows transfers took a magnitude more time than the others. Ten times longer. Since we could see this across multiple tests each being run multiple times and it was also visible with third party tools, the only conclusion I can draw from this is that Windows for some reason has a much slower localhost.

Does any reader of this have any further knowledge or details to share on this topic? Anyone knows if more recent Windows versions do this any better?

It should be noted that on Windows the ssh server used was running in cygwin, which may account for some of the slowness as cygwin isn’t really known for being blazingly fast…

Update:

Three friends responded to this question:

The first mention that he’d got problems on windows in the past where 127.0.0.1 worked but ‘localhost’ didn’t which might indicate that localhost for some reason would be treated differently.

The second said that it has been mentioned that Windows Vista has significant TCP improvements compared to older versions for which version the TCP/IP stack was rewritten completely.

Pierre (at Microsoft) pointed out that on Vista localhost resolves first to ::1 (ipv6) only, which may explain why some people experience quirks on Vista at least. This test was however done on XP…