Tag Archives: svn

What a removed search from Google looks like

Back in the days when I participated in the starting of the Subversion project, I found the mailing list archive we had really dysfunctional and hard to use, so I set up a separate archive for the benefit of everyone who wanted an alternative way to find Subversion related posts.

This archive is still alive and it recently surpassed 370,000 archived emails, all related to Subversion, for seven different mailing lists.

Today I received a notice from Google (shown in its entirety below) that one of the mails received in 2009 is now apparently removed from a search using a name - if done within the European Union at least. It is hard to take this seriously when you look at the page in question, and as there aren't that very many names involved in that page the possibilities of which name it is aren't that many. As there are several different mail archives for Subversion mails I can only assume that the alternative search results also have been removed.

This is the first removal I've got for any of the sites and contents I host.


Notice of removal from Google Search

Hello,

Due to a request under data protection law in Europe, we are no longer able to show one or more pages from your site in our search results in response to some search queries for names or other personal identifiers. Only results on European versions of Google are affected. No action is required from you.

These pages have not been blocked entirely from our search results, and will continue to appear for queries other than those specified by individuals in the European data protection law requests we have honored. Unfortunately, due to individual privacy concerns, we are not able to disclose which queries have been affected.

Please note that in many cases, the affected queries do not relate to the name of any person mentioned prominently on the page. For example, in some cases, the name may appear only in a comment section.

If you believe Google should be aware of additional information regarding this content that might result in a reversal or other change to this removal action, you can use our form at https://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/eu-privacy-webmaster. Please note that we can't guarantee responses to submissions to that form.

The following URLs have been affected by this action:

http://svn.haxx.se/users/archive-2009-08/0808.shtml

Regards,

The Google Team

Why curl sticks with CVS

Occasionally people ask me or just mock me because we're still using CVS in the curl project, even though there are much more compelling alternatives out there now. Subversion, git, Bzr, Mercurial, etc. I am even a contributor and committer in the Subversion project. (Although I'll be the first to admit that I never committed much and the stuff I did was done many years ago.)

CVS just isn't bad enough to warrant the work of a replacement. curl is a tiny project (source code wise) and while CVS has several flaws in how it is designed and works, those flaws never hurt us much. Basically the only one is the lack of rename support and that has no major impact on us.

On the contrary, CVS has the upside of being established and rock solid since many years so people on all sorts of platforms can use it and get the curl source code. This is important especially for our automated build-system which we try hard to find volunteers for to run automatically daily around-the-clock (the results and outputs are then mailed to our central autobuild master server that collects and presents them) and then those guys need to be able to checkout the code easily. Using more modern tools will make it harder since those aren't available as widely as binary packages for as many (outdated) platforms as CVS is.

So curl sticks with CVS for now.