Tag Archives: funding

Taking hyper-curl further

Thanks to funding by ISRG (via Google), we merged the hyper powered HTTP back-end into curl earlier this year as an alternative HTTP/1 and HTTP/2 implementation. Previously, there was only one way to do HTTP/1 and 2 in curl.

Backends

Core libcurl functionality can be powered by optional and alternative backends in a way that doesn’t change the API or directly affect the application. This is done by featuring internal APIs that can be implemented by independent components. See the illustration below (click for higher resolution).

This is a slide from Daniel’s libcurl under the hood presentation.

curl 7.75.0 became the first curl release that could be built with hyper. The support for it was labeled “experimental” as while most of all common and basic use cases were supported, we still couldn’t run the full test suite when built with it and some edge cases even crashed.

We’ve subsequently fixed a few of the worst flaws so the Hyper powered curl has gradually and slowly improved since then.

Going further

Our best friends at ISRG has now once again put up funding and I’ll spend more work hours on making sure that more (preferably all) tests can run with hyper.

I’ve already started. Right now I’m sitting and staring at test case 154 which is doing a HTTP PUT using Digest authentication and an Expect: 100-continue header and this test case currently doesn’t work correctly when built to use Hyper. I’ll report back in a few weeks and let you know how it goes – and then I don’t mean with just test 154!

Consider yourself invited to join the #curl IRC channel and chat if you want live reports or want to help out!

Fund

You too can fund me to do curl work. Get in touch!

libcurl multi_socket 3333 days later

.SE-logoOn October 25, 2005 I sent out the announcement about “libcurl funding from the Swedish IIS Foundation“. It was the beginning of what would eventually become the curl_multi_socket_action() function and its related API features. The API we provide for event-driven applications. This API is the most suitable one in libcurl if you intend to scale up your client up to and beyond hundreds or thousands of simultaneous transfers.

Thanks to this funding from IIS, I could spend a couple of months working full-time on implementing the ideas I had. They paid me the equivalent of 19,000 USD back then. IIS is the non-profit foundation that runs the .se TLD and they fund projects that help internet and internet usage, in particular in Sweden. IIS usually just call themselves “.se” (dot ess ee) these days.

Event-based programming isn’t generally the easiest approach so most people don’t easily take this route without careful consideration, and also if you want your event-based application to be portable among multiple platforms you also need to use an event-based library that abstracts the underlying function calls. These are all reasons why this remains a niche API in libcurl, used only by a small portion of users. Still, there are users and they seem to be able to use this API fine. A success in my eyes.

One dollar billPart of that improvement project to make libcurl scale and perform better, was also to introduce HTTP pipelining support. I didn’t quite manage that part with in the scope of that project but the pipelining support in libcurl was born in that period  (autumn 2006) but had to be improved several times over the years until it became decently good just a few years ago – and we’re just now (still) fixing more pipelining problems.

On December 10, 2014 there are exactly 3333 days since that initial announcement of mine. I’d like to highlight this occasion by thanking IIS again. Thanks IIS!

Current funding

These days I’m spending a part of my daytime job working on curl with my employer’s blessing and that’s the funding I have – most of my personal time spent is still spare time. I certainly wouldn’t mind seeing others help out, but the best funding is provided as pure man power that can help out and not by trying to buy my time to add your features. Also, I will decline all (friendly) offers to host the web site on your servers since we already have a fairly stable and reliable infrastructure sponsored.

I’m not aware of anyone else that are spending (much) paid work time on curl code, although I’m know there are quite a few who do it every now and then – especially to fix problems that occur in commercial products or services or to add features to such.

IIS still donates money to internet related projects in Sweden but I never applied for any funding from them again. Mostly because it has been hard to sync with my normal life and job situation. If you’re a Swede or just live in Sweden, do consider checking this out for your next internet adventure!