Tag Archives: .SE

libcurl multi_socket 3333 days later

.SE-logoOn October 25, 2005 I sent out the announcement about “libcurl funding from the Swedish IIS Foundation“. It was the beginning of what would eventually become the curl_multi_socket_action() function and its related API features. The API we provide for event-driven applications. This API is the most suitable one in libcurl if you intend to scale up your client up to and beyond hundreds or thousands of simultaneous transfers.

Thanks to this funding from IIS, I could spend a couple of months working full-time on implementing the ideas I had. They paid me the equivalent of 19,000 USD back then. IIS is the non-profit foundation that runs the .se TLD and they fund projects that help internet and internet usage, in particular in Sweden. IIS usually just call themselves “.se” (dot ess ee) these days.

Event-based programming isn’t generally the easiest approach so most people don’t easily take this route without careful consideration, and also if you want your event-based application to be portable among multiple platforms you also need to use an event-based library that abstracts the underlying function calls. These are all reasons why this remains a niche API in libcurl, used only by a small portion of users. Still, there are users and they seem to be able to use this API fine. A success in my eyes.

One dollar billPart of that improvement project to make libcurl scale and perform better, was also to introduce HTTP pipelining support. I didn’t quite manage that part with in the scope of that project but the pipelining support in libcurl was born in that period  (autumn 2006) but had to be improved several times over the years until it became decently good just a few years ago – and we’re just now (still) fixing more pipelining problems.

On December 10, 2014 there are exactly 3333 days since that initial announcement of mine. I’d like to highlight this occasion by thanking IIS again. Thanks IIS!

Current funding

These days I’m spending a part of my daytime job working on curl with my employer’s blessing and that’s the funding I have – most of my personal time spent is still spare time. I certainly wouldn’t mind seeing others help out, but the best funding is provided as pure man power that can help out and not by trying to buy my time to add your features. Also, I will decline all (friendly) offers to host the web site on your servers since we already have a fairly stable and reliable infrastructure sponsored.

I’m not aware of anyone else that are spending (much) paid work time on curl code, although I’m know there are quite a few who do it every now and then – especially to fix problems that occur in commercial products or services or to add features to such.

IIS still donates money to internet related projects in Sweden but I never applied for any funding from them again. Mostly because it has been hard to sync with my normal life and job situation. If you’re a Swede or just live in Sweden, do consider checking this out for your next internet adventure!

Living With Open Source

.SEAs a session during the Internetdagarna conference (orginized by .SE), Björn Stenberg, Daniel Melin and I joined up to talk about open source with the title “Living With Open Source” (“Att Leva med Öppen Källkod” in the language of the brave: Swedish) on October 27. We did a 90 minute session split up between the three of us. The session was in Swedish and it was recorded so I expect that it will be made available online soon for those who are curious but didn’t attend.

Bjorn Stenberg during "att leva med Öppen kallkod"

Björn (on the picture above) started off by talking about how to work with Open Source as a user when using Open Source components. How to deal with changes, sending upstream, the cost of keeping changes private etc.

Talare - Att leva med öppen källkodDaniel Melin continued and talked about open source licensing. It is quite clearly an area that people find tricky and mysterious, judging from the many questions that followed. I think large parts of the audience wasn’t very advanced or well versed into open source details so then of course there is a lot to learn and to talk about. I think we all felt that we tried to cover quite a lot that together with the questions was hard to fit within the given time.

I ended our triplet by talking about open source from a producer’s viewpoint, how we view things in a typical open source project and I used a lot of details and factual points from the cURL project.

The audience consisted of perhaps 50 people. We had a rather nerdy subject and we had tough competition from five other parallel sessions, with some of them featuring Internet and other local celebrities.

Over all, I think we did good. The idea that held our three talks together I think was fine, we kept the schedule pretty good, the audience seemed to enjoy it and I had a great time. And we got a really nice lunch afterwards!

git, patents, meego and android

dotse-logoAt this Tuesday afternoon, almost 100 people apparently managed to escape work and attend foss-sthlm’s fourth meeting. This time graciously sponsored by .SE who stood for the facilities, the coffee etc. Thank you .SE! Yours truly did his best to make it happen and to make sure we had a variety of talks by skilled people and I think we did good this time as well! This meeting took place at the same time the big Internetdagarna conference had their 6(!) parallel tracks in the building just next to ours, so it was also rather fierce competition for attention.

Robin with git

Robin Rosenberg started off the sessions by telling us about git and related dives into JGit, EGit, gerrit, code reviews and Eclipse. Robin is a core developer in the EGit/JGit projects. While I think I know at least a little git already, Robin provided an overlook over several different things in a good way. (It should be noted that Robin was called in very late in the game due to another talker having to drop out.)

As a side-note, I will never cease to be amazed by the habit in Java land to re-implement everything in “pure Java” instead of simply wrapping around the existing code/tools and leveraging what already exists and is stable…

Jonas with patents

Jonas Bosson spoke about the dangers with software patents and how they are not good, they’re hindering innovation and cost a lot of money for everyone involved. He also pledged the audience to join FFII to help the cause. You can tell Jonas is quite committed to this subject and really believes in this! And quite frankly, I don’t think a lot of people in this surrounding would argue against him…

Andreas with MeegoMeeGo

Andreas Jakl, just arrived from a rainy Helsinki, then told us (in English while all the other talks were in Swedish) about how to develop stuff with Qt for Symbian, Meego or desktop using the same tools. He showed us the latest fancy GUI builder they have called Qt Quick and how they use QML to do fancy things in a fast manner. He also managed to show us the code running in simulator and on device. Quite impressive. Andreas is a very good speaker and did a very complete session. As a bonus point, he used ‘haxx.se’ as test site for demonstrating his little demo build and of course you can’t help loving him more then? 😉

Johan with Android

Android

Johan Nilsson started off just after the coffee break with educating us how you can do push stuff from your server applications to your mobile device. How it works and how to control that in various way. Johan’s presentation was into details, in a way at least I really appreciated it, and his (hand drawn on paper then scanned) graphics used in the presentation were stunning! The fact that Johan sneaked in a couple of curl command lines of course gave him bonus points in my mind! 😉

Henrik with FribidFribid

Henrik Nordström took the stage and briefed us on the status of the Fribid project, which is a very Swedish-centric project that works on implementing full Linux support for “bankid” which is a electronic identification system established by a consortium of Swedish banks and is used by a wide range of authorities and organizations these days. The existing Linux client is poor (and hard to get working right), closed source, saves data encrypted with private hidden keys etc.

Food, Talk, Tablets

We_Tab-140-Motiv_4-3

In the restaurant after the seminaries, we gathered in a basement with beer in our glasses and chili on our plates and there was lots of open source and foss talks and we had a great time and good drinks. Two attendees brought their new tablets, which made us able to play with them and compare. the Android Samsung Galaxy Tab and the german Meego based WeTab.

Samsung Galaxy TabTo me there really wasn’t any competition. The Galaxy Tab is a slick, fast and nice device that feels like a big Android phone and it’s really usable and I could possibly see myself using it for emails and browsing. It was a while since I tried an Ipad but it gave about the same speed impression.

The WeTab however, even if it runs a modified Meego that isn’t “original” and that might suffer from bugs and what not, was a rough UI that looked far too much like my regular X Window system put in a touch device. For example, and I think this is telling, you scroll a web page down by using the right-side scroll bar and not by touching the screen in the middle and dragging it down like you’d do on IOS or Android. In fact, when I dragged down the scroll-bar like that I found it far too easy to accidentally then press one of the buttons that are always present immediately to the right of the scrollbar. Of course, the Galaxy Tab is a smaller device and also much more expensive, so perhaps those factors will bring a few users to WeTab then still.

I don’t think I’ll get a tablet anytime soon though, I just don’t see when I would use it.

Summary

I didn’t do any particular talk this time, but I felt we had a lot of good content and I can always blurb another time anyway. I really really like that we so far have managed to get lots of different speakers and I hope that we can continue to get many new speakers before we have to recycle.

It was a great afternoon and evening. All the good people and encouraging words inspire me to keep up my work and efforts on this, and I’m now aiming towards another meeting in the early 2011.

I will do another post later on when the videos from these talks go online.

Foss-sthlm on Internetdagarna

Yes, I’m very happy to say that our good friends at .SE (who run and admin the .se TLD and more) like FOSS a lot and they are organizing Swedish perhaps biggest conference on internet-related stuff annually in October: Internetdagarna. This year, they’ve reached out to cooperate with us – the foss-sthlm foss network – to arrange and hold a meeting of our own during the conference.

The foss-sthlm meeting will not be within the actual conference, but will be held just next door. We intend to hold the meeting admission-free just as before – the way we like! I hope and think that we will be able to arrange another kick-ass meeting then and with .SE’s help we will get the arrangements done in style. I just very well may end up doing a talk myself at that meeting. (We call that meeting #4 for now, but it’s by no means decided that it actually will end up being the forth one this year.)

Let me again just mention that foss-sthlm is no formal organization and it has no leaders and no actual members. We’re all just individuals. However, I work to get things to happen within the network and I thus sometimes appear to “speak for” us, although in the end I of course only speak for myself and I help out to arrange things that I hope others will appreciate as well.

OPTIMERA STHLM

Our friends at .SE are once again putting together an interesting conference-style day with talks, and this time the title of it is “OPTIMERA STHLM” (yes they use all caps) and it is all about optimizing web-related things.

I’ve been invited and I will do a 30 minute talk during that day about the transport layer and stuff on top of the transport layer. In other words it’ll include things to consider for TCP, DNS, HTTP, handling sockets, libcurl and a quick look at things such as Websockets, SPDY, MPTCP and SCTP.

The full day’s program is now available on the linked page. Enjoy!