Bjarni got the award 2010

Sunday, November 7th, 2010

The Nordic Free Software Award 2010 was given the Icelandic hacker Bjarni Rúnar Einarsson.

The formal handing over of the prize was done during the social event at FSCONS 2010, with hundreds of free software hackers attending and a lot joy. Bjarni was also immediately invited to participate in the NFSA jury for next year, in an attempt to start a tradition of getting former winners on the jury.

NFSA-award

I’m happy to say that I served in the jury for the award this year. We were a bunch of Nordic free software enthusiasts in there, involving several previous winners. The winner this year, Bjarni Rúnar, was selected by us having a nomination process in which we received I believe 11 names and then a subsequent voting within the jury.

I did the press release draft and Karsten from FSFE polished it into something much better. I think that will go out early this week and I am now even mentioned as press contact for Sweden about the award. The FSFE posted their announcement, including my last name wrongly spelled…

The social event then went on with lots of free software talks with cool people from the entire Nordic region, and I certainly met a whole bunch of friendly hackers I didn’t know before. It was also great fun to run into Giuseppe, the current wget maintainer.

(The picture might just be a fake.)

The award for me

Sunday, November 7th, 2010

I was asked what the Nordic Free Software Award that I received last year meant to me. This was my response that I now repost here for the public to see:

Daniel WinnerTo me, the NFSA is a recognition from my own kind. A really big thumbs-up from within my own team. From fellow hackers who know.

In a world where we spend lots and lots of time alone in front of screens during long dark hours, where most of what you do is just silently pushed into source code repositories or consumed by eager downloaders distributed all over the world, getting that kind of positivism is invaluable.

I found it to not only be a very big ego boost, but it also really ignited my desire to do more, to reach further and to prove that my receiving of the award is the beginning and not the end of what I am set to do in our free software world. In my particular case it was a primary factor behind the start of the Foss-sthlm network that I co-started not long after I got the award. I’ve pushed foss-sthlm forwards during this year with several meetings with a hundred or more attendees.

Getting weird looks from outsiders or a thank you from the occasional user is fun, but getting an award from people who actually know what you might have done and what it takes to do it, is priceless.

I’m perfectly aware that I am the super-nerd. I’m not the social guy. I’m not the person who unite crowds or inspire teams to create miracles. I’m a software developer and I design and create code. Lots of it. I debate technical details, protocols and choices on mailing lists. Lots of them. I share as much as possible of all that of course and I’m thrilled that what I do is considered this good and is appreciated to this extent.

Everyone doing volunteer work wants to get recognition for their efforts. I got it. Thank you!

During the social event at FSCONS 2010 when we announced the winner of this year and handed him his prizes, I was also given the prize I never received last year because I wasn’t around at the actual award ceremony then. And of course, these guys love puns so…

Award prizes

From the left: a box with rocks (for my work on Rockbox), a transformer toy (I don’t quite recall the reason for that) and curlers (for my work on curl). Click on the image to see it in full resolution, it is taken with my crappy mobile camera.

Nominations for Nordic Free Software Award 2010

Wednesday, September 1st, 2010

Until October 22 you can nominate a person, a project or an organisation for the Nordic Free Software Award.

The Nordic Free Software Award is given to people, projects or organisations in the Nordic countries that have made a prominent contribution to the advancement of Free Software. The award will be announced during FSCONS 2010 in Gothenburg.

To nominate your favorite, email award at fscons.org with the following information:

  • Name of nominee
  • Description/Bio of the nominee
  • Motivation for the award
  • Description of accomplishments

Yours truly was awarded last year together with Simon Josefsson. 2008, the award was given to Mats Östling and 2007 to SkoleLinux.

Now go send in your award nomination.

Disclaimer: I’m a member of the jury this year!

I won it! You guys are the best.

Saturday, November 14th, 2009

I am happy and very proud to mention that I was just this evening awarded the Nordic Free Software Award 2009 and I share the award with my good friend and hacker extraordinaire Simon Josefsson.

Thank you jury. Thank you mates all over who by your positive feedback makes it a joy to work in the open source and free software community. Thank you to all you fellow hackers and contributors who work hard and tirelessly and therefore enable me to do what I want to do and do these things I today got awarded for.

Getting recognition from actual fellow peers within my own community is just the best.

And you know what? I will continue to work hard and I will continue to do open source and free software intensively and with my strengthened beliefs of what I think is right.

Thank you.

Nordic Free Software Award nominee 2009

Friday, November 6th, 2009

I’m proud and happy to mention that I’ve been nominated for the “Nordic Free Software Award” 2009. I’ve been nominated before, in 2007 and 2008, but it still feels very good.

Dear Daniel Stenberg

The Nordic Free Software Award jury is delighted to inform you that you have been nominated for the 2009 Nordic Free Software Award. The Nordic Free Software Award is given out every years at FSCONS to honor an individual or team who have made a significant contribution to Free Software.

Congratulations and warm wishes on behalf of the Nordic Free Software Award jury

The list of nominees is now published and contains a fair bunch of giants in our field against which I am just an ant in comparison. The list of nominees:

  • Qt development team
  • Simon Josefsson
  • Daniel Stenberg
  • Henrik Nordström
  • Björn Stenberg
  • Andreas Nilsson
  • Varnish
  • Ask Bjørn Hansen
  • Knut Yrvin
  • Jari “Rakshasa” Sundell

My Nordic Free Software Awards 2009 nominees

Friday, September 25th, 2009

Hey, it’s really about time to nominate your favourite Free Software persons and projects from the nordic region for the 2009 awards before the time runs out.

This year, I decided to nominate the following “nordic” heroes:

Simon Josefsson

For his excellent work in GnuTLS, libssh2 and a bunch of other projects.

Henrik Nordström

For his work in the Squid project, and his efforts within IETF and its HTTP related struggles and more.

Björn Stenberg

As the primary founder of the Rockbox project. He started somehting special back in 2001 that now is a huge, thriving and succesful Free Software project.

As you might spot, I favor “doers”. I don’t believe in the concept of “nordic projects” when it comes to free or open software – the entire concept of open and free should mean that projects cross borders and regions.

In fact, it feels so out of the ordinary to think about open source people in a geographical context I find it hard to come up with a lot of names. It would be cool if ohloh had some ways to list people and projects based on where people live.

Then again, if a person from a nordic country moves somewhere else, is he or she still a nordic person? Does it depend on where the person lived during the actual act? Is Linus Torvalds a nordic person since he was born, lived many years and started his big project in Finland?

(yeah I already blogged about this subject but hey, it can’t hurt can it?)

Top Free Software persoject 2009?!

Friday, May 1st, 2009

As two years before this, FSCONS is again looking for nominees for The Nordic Free Software Award 2009.

If you know any fine persons or projects you think are fitting and are from “the Nordic countries“, head over to that web page and submit!

And btw, this year’s FSCONS is set for November 13-15 although their site is still pitch black. I hope to be able to go there this year. Perhaps even do a talk about something!

Update: the word ‘persoject’ is not a mistake, even though it looks weird and wasn’t explained in this post. It was just a word I made up last year when I blogged about this award, and I re-used it now without thinking much about it… I won’t do it again. I promise! ;-)

The NFSA 2008 went to…

Tuesday, October 28th, 2008

The Nordic Free Software Award 2008 went to Mats Östling for programverket.org which is “a project operating with open software and open software development in the public sector. The purpose is to achieve more collaboration and more efficient IT application within the public sector“. Congratulations Mats!

The FSCONS official site (the award was handed out during that event) keeps up with its tradition with being totally behind the schedule and isn’t even mentioning the winner yet…

I’m not sure only two awards is enough to draw any conclusions, but with Skolelinux last year and a public sector open source project this year it certainly gives a feeling what the jury has prioritized so far.

Nordic Free Software Award Nominee 2008

Monday, October 13th, 2008

It seems I’m again (as I was last year) nominated for the Nordic Free Software Award.

They list thirteen nominees, of which there are four organizations/companies. I’m proud to be mentioned in such a swell company.

Unfortunately I cannot be present at the FSCONS itself this year (where the award is being handed over), so all the partying and celebrating the award winner will have to be done without me! :-)

“Nordic” Projects?

Monday, July 7th, 2008

It did struck me why the idea of handing the Nordic Free Software Award to a project feels like a bad idea: Free Software projects really aren’t geographical in general.

People tend to live at a fixed location for a specific time and thus you can say that N is living in a Nordic country or not.

Free Software projects however, are not even allowed to exclude people from other places and even projects that may origin at once place or even have its largest user-base in a particular geographical spot.

Last year’s Nordic Free Software Award was handed to Skolelinux since I believe the project origins in Norway (a nordic country) and some of the leading persons in the project are Norwegian. But is that then a nordic project? I don’t want to claim that it isn’t because I honestly don’t know, but their web site certainly says nothing about it being restricted or limited to nordic countries in any significant way. If it does, I couldn’t find it.

I am the primary person and maintainer behind curl but I wouldn’t dream of calling it a “nordic” project. The trio who started Rockbox are all Swedish but calling it a nordic project would just make me laugh.

Isn’t it so, that if you can come up with a “Nordic” Free Software project that currently only lives and strives within one or more Nordic countries without spreading itself over the world, isn’t that then more likely to be a proof of a failure of said project than anything else?