All posts by Daniel Stenberg

quic wg interim Kista

The IETF QUIC working group had its fifth interim meeting the other day, this time in Kista, Sweden hosted by Ericsson. For me as a Stockholm resident, this was ridiculously convenient. Not entirely coincidentally, this was also the first quic interim I attended in person.

We were 30 something persons gathered in a room without windows, with another dozen or so participants joining from remote. This being a meeting in a series, most people already know each other from before so the atmosphere was relaxed and friendly. Lots of the participants have also been involved in other protocol developments and standards before. Many familiar faces.

Schedule

As QUIC is supposed to be done "soon", the emphasis is now a lot to close issues, postpone some stuff to "QUICv2" and make sure to get decisions on outstanding question marks.

Kazuho did a quick run-through with some info from the interop days prior to the meeting.

After MT's initial explanation of where we're at for the upcoming draft-13, Ian took us a on a deep dive into the Stream 0 Design Team report. This is a pretty radical change of how the wire format of the quic protocol, and how the TLS is being handled.

The existing draft-12 approach...

Is suggested to instead become...

What's perhaps the most interesting take away here is that the new format doesn't use TLS records anymore - but simplifies a lot of other things. Not using TLS records but still doing TLS means that a QUIC implementation needs to get data from the TLS layer using APIs that existing TLS libraries don't typically provide. PicoTLS, Minq, BoringSSL. NSS already have or will soon provide the necessary APIs. Slightly behind, OpenSSL should offer it in a nightly build soon but the impression is that it is still a bit away from an actual OpenSSL release.

EKR continued the theme. He talked about the quic handshake flow and among other things explained how 0-RTT and early data works. Taken from that context, I consider this slide (shown below) fairly funny because it makes it look far from simple to me. But it shows communication in different layers, and how the acks go, etc.

HTTP

Mike then presented the state of HTTP over quic. The frames are no longer that similar to the HTTP/2 versions. Work is done to ensure that the HTTP layer doesn't need to refer or "grab" stream IDs from the transport layer.

There was a rather lengthy discussion around how to handle "placeholder streams" like the ones Firefox uses over HTTP/2 to create "anchors" on which to make dependencies but are never actually used over the wire. The nature of the quic transport makes those impractical and we talked about what alternatives there are that could still offer similar functionality.

The subject of priorities and dependencies and if the relative complexity of the h2 model should be replaced by something simpler came up (again) but was ultimately pushed aside.

QPACK

Alan presented the state of QPACK, the HTTP header compression algorithm for hq (HTTP over QUIC). It is not wire compatible with HPACK anymore and there have been some recent improvements and clarifications done.

Alan also did a great step-by-step walk-through how QPACK works with adding headers to the dynamic table and how it works with its indices etc. It was very clarifying I thought.

The discussion about the static table for the compression basically ended with us agreeing that we should just agree on a fairly small fixed table without a way to negotiate the table. Mark said he'd try to get some updated header data from some server deployments to get another data set than just the one from WPT (which is from a single browser).

Interop-testing of QPACK implementations can be done by encode  + shuffle + decode a HAR file and compare the results with the source data. Just do it - and talk to Alan!

And the first day was over. A fully packed day.

ECN

Magnus started off with some heavy stuff talking Explicit Congestion Notification in QUIC and it how it is intended to work and some remaining issues.

He also got into the subject of ACK frequency and how the current model isn't ideal in every situation, causing to work like this image below (from Magnus' slide set):

Interestingly, it turned out that several of the implementers already basically had implemented Magnus' proposal of changing the max delay to min(RTT/4, 25 ms) independently of each other!

mvfst deployment

Subodh took us on a journey with some great insights from Facebook's deployment of mvfast internally, their QUIC implementation. Getting some real-life feedback is useful and with over 100 billion requests/day, it seems they did give this a good run.

Since their usage and stack for this is a bit use case specific I'm not sure how relevant or universal their performance numbers are. They showed roughly the same CPU and memory use, with a 70% RPS rate compared to h2 over TLS 1.2.

He also entertained us with some "fun issues" from bugs and debugging sessions they've done and learned from. Awesome.

The story highlights the need for more tooling around QUIC to help developers and deployers.

Load balancers

Martin talked about load balancers and servers, and how they could or should communicate to work correctly with routing and connection IDs.

The room didn't seem overly thrilled about this work and mostly offered other ways to achieve the same results.

Implicit Open

During the last session for the day and the entire meeting, was mt going through a few things that still needed discussion or closure. On stateless reset and the rather big bike shed issue: implicit open. The later being the question if opening a stream with ID N + 1 implicitly also opens the stream with ID N. I believe we ended with a slight preference to the implicit approach and this will be taken to the list for a consensus call.

Frame type extensibility

How should the QUIC protocol allow extensibility? The oldest still open issue in the project can be solved or satisfied in numerous different ways and the discussion waved back and forth for a while, debating various approaches merits and downsides until the group more or less agreed on a fairly simple and straight forward approach where the extensions will announce support for a feature which then may or may involve one or more new frame types (to be in a registry).

We proceeded to discuss other issues all until "closing time", which was set to be 16:00 today. This was just two days of pushing forward but still it felt quite intense and my personal impression is that there were a lot of good progress made here that took the protocol a good step forward.

The facilities were lovely and Ericsson was a great host for us. The Thursday afternoon cakes were great! Thank you!

Coming up

There's an IETF meeting in Montreal in July and there's a planned next QUIC interim probably in New York in September.

Inside Firefox’s DOH engine

DNS over HTTPS (DOH) is a feature where a client shortcuts the standard native resolver and instead asks a dedicated DOH server to resolve names.

Compared to regular unprotected DNS lookups done over UDP or TCP, DOH increases privacy, security and sometimes even performance. It also makes it easy to use a name server of your choice for a particular application instead of the one configured globally (often by someone else) for your entire system.

DNS over HTTPS is quite simply the same regular DNS packets (RFC 1035 style) normally sent in clear-text over UDP or TCP but instead sent with HTTPS requests. Your typical DNS server provider (like your ISP) might not support this yet.

To get the finer details of this concept, check out Lin Clark's awesome cartoon explanation of DNS and DOH.

This new Firefox feature is planned to get ready and ship in Firefox release 62 (early September 2018). You can test it already now in Firefox Nightly by setting preferences manually as described below.

This article will explain some of the tweaks, inner details and the finer workings of the Firefox TRR implementation (TRR == Trusted Recursive Resolver) that speaks DOH.

Preferences

All preferences (go to "about:config") for this functionality are located under the "network.trr" prefix.

network.trr.mode - set which resolver mode you want.

0 - Off (default). use standard native resolving only (don't use TRR at all)
1 - Race native against TRR. Do them both in parallel and go with the one that returns a result first.
2 - TRR first. Use TRR first, and only if the name resolve fails use the native resolver as a fallback.
3 - TRR only. Only use TRR. Never use the native (after the initial setup).
4 - Shadow mode. Runs the TRR resolves in parallel with the native for timing and measurements but uses only the native resolver results.
5 - Explicitly off. Also off, but selected off by choice and not default.

network.trr.uri - (default: none) set the URI for your DOH server. That's the URL Firefox will issue its HTTP request to. It must be a HTTPS URL (non-HTTPS URIs will simply be ignored). If "useGET" is enabled, Firefox will append "?ct&dns=...." to the URI when it makes its HTTP requests. For the default POST requests, they will be issued to exactly the specified URI.

"mode" and "uri" are the only two prefs required to set to activate TRR. The rest of them listed below are for tweaking behavior.

We list some publicly known DOH servers here. If you prefer to, it is easy to setup and run your own.

network.trr.credentials - (default: none) set credentials that will be used in the HTTP requests to the DOH end-point. It is the right side content, the value, sent in the Authorization: request header. Handy if you for example want to run your own public server and yet limit who can use it.

network.trr.wait-for-portal - (default: true) this boolean tells Firefox to first wait for the captive portal detection to signal "okay" before TRR is used.

network.trr.allow-rfc1918 - (default: false) set this to true to allow RFC 1918 private addresses in TRR responses. When set false, any such response will be considered a wrong response that won't be used.

network.trr.useGET - (default: false) When the browser issues a request to the DOH server to resolve host names, it can do that using POST or GET. By default Firefox will use POST, but by toggling this you can enforce GET to be used instead. The DOH spec says a server MUST support both methods.

network.trr.confirmationNS - (default: example.com) At startup, Firefox will first check an NS entry to verify that TRR works, before it gets enabled for real and used for name resolves. This preference sets which domain to check. The verification only checks for a positive answer, it doesn't actually care what the response data says.

network.trr.bootstrapAddress - (default: none) by setting this field to the IP address of the host name used in "network.trr.uri", you can bypass using the system native resolver for it. This avoids that initial (native) name resolve for the host name mentioned in the network.trr.uri pref.

network.trr.blacklist-duration - (default: 60) is the number of seconds a name will be kept in the TRR blacklist until it expires and can be tried again. The default duration is one minute. (Update: this has been cut down from previous longer defaults.)

network.trr.request-timeout - (default: 3000) is the number of milliseconds a request to and corresponding response from the DOH server is allowed to spend until considered failed and discarded.

network.trr.early-AAAA - (default: false) For each normal name resolve, Firefox issues one HTTP request for A entries and another for AAAA entries. The responses come back separately and can come in any order. If the A records arrive first, Firefox will - as an optimization - continue and use those addresses without waiting for the second response. If the AAAA records arrive first, Firefox will only continue and use them immediately if this option is set to true.

network.trr.max-fails - (default: 5) If this many DoH requests in a row fails, consider TRR broken and go back to verify-NS state. This is meant to detect situations when the DoH server dies.

network.trr.disable-ECS - (default: true) If set, TRR asks the resolver to disable ECS (EDNS Client Subnet - the method where the resolver passes on the subnet of the client asking the question). Some resolvers will use ECS to the upstream if this request is not passed on to them.

Split-horizon and blacklist

With regular DNS, it is common to have clients in different places get different results back. This can be done since the servers know from where the request comes (which also enables quite a degree of spying) and they can then respond accordingly. When switching to another resolver with TRR, you may experience that you don't always get the same set of addresses back. At times, this causes problems.

As a precaution, Firefox features a system that detects if a name can't be resolved at all with TRR and can then fall back and try again with just the native resolver (the so called TRR-first mode). Ending up in this scenario is of course slower and leaks the name over clear-text UDP but this safety mechanism exists to avoid users risking ending up in a black hole where certain sites can't be accessed. Names that causes such TRR failures are then put in an internal dynamic blacklist so that subsequent uses of that name automatically avoids using DNS-over-HTTPS for a while (see the blacklist-duration pref to control that period). Of course this fall-back is not in use if TRR-only mode is selected.

In addition, if a host's address is retrieved via TRR and Firefox subsequently fails to connect to that host, it will redo the resolve without DOH and retry the connect again just to make sure that it wasn't a split-horizon situation that caused the problem.

When a host name is added to the TRR blacklist, its domain also gets checked in the background to see if that whole domain perhaps should be blacklisted to ensure a smoother ride going forward.

Additionally, "localhost" and all names in the ".local" TLD are sort of hard-coded as blacklisted and will never be resolved with TRR. (Unless you run TRR-only...)

TTL as a bonus!

With the implementation of DNS-over-HTTPS, Firefox now gets the TTL (Time To Live, how long a record is valid) value for each DNS address record and can store and use that for expiry time in its internal DNS cache. Having accurate lifetimes improves the cache as it then knows exactly how long the name is meant to work and means less guessing and heuristics.

When using the native name resolver functions, this time-to-live data is normally not provided and Firefox does in fact not use the TTL on other platforms than Windows and on Windows it has to perform some rather awkward quirks to get the TTL from DNS for each record.

Server push

Still left to see how useful this will become in real-life, but DOH servers can push new or updated DNS records to Firefox. HTTP/2 Server Push being responses to requests the client didn't send but the server thinks the client might appreciate anyway as if it sent requests for those resources.

These pushed DNS records will be treated as regular name resolve responses and feed the Firefox in-memory DNS cache, making subsequent resolves of those names to happen instantly.

Bootstrap

You specify the DOH service as a full URI with a name that needs to be resolved, and in a cold start Firefox won't know the IP address of that name and thus needs to resolve it first (or use the provided address you can set with network.trr.bootstrapAddress). Firefox will then use the native resolver for that, until TRR has proven itself to work by resolving the network.trr.confirmationNS test domain. Firefox will also by default wait for the captive portal check to signal "OK" before it uses TRR, unless you tell it otherwise.

As a result of this bootstrap procedure, and if you're not in TRR-only mode, you might still get  a few native name resolves done at initial Firefox startups. Just telling you this so you don't panic if you see a few show up.

CNAME

The code is aware of CNAME records and will "chase" them down and use the final A/AAAA entry with its TTL as if there were no CNAMEs present and store that in the in-memory DNS cache. This initial approach, at least, does not cache the intermediate CNAMEs nor does it care about the CNAME TTL values.

Firefox currently allows no more than 64(!) levels of CNAME redirections.

about:networking

Enter that address in the Firefox URL bar to reach the debug screen with a bunch of networking information. If you then click the DNS entry in the left menu, you'll get to see the contents of Firefox's in-memory DNS cache. The TRR column says true or false for each name if that was resolved using TRR or not. If it wasn't, the native resolver was used instead for that name.

Private Browsing

When in private browsing mode, DOH behaves similar to regular name resolves: it keeps DNS cache entries separately from the regular ones and the TRR blacklist is then only kept in memory and not persisted to disk. The DNS cache is flushed when the last PB session is exited.

Tools

I wrote up dns2doh, a little tool to create DOH requests and responses with, that can be used to build your own toy server with and to generate requests to send with curl or similar.

It allows you to manually issue a type A (regular IPv4 address) DOH request like this:

$ dns2doh --A --onlyq --raw daniel.haxx.se | \
curl --data-binary @- \
https://dns.cloudflare.com/.well-known/dns \
-H "Content-Type: application/dns-udpwireformat"

I also wrote doh, which is a small stand-alone tool (based on libcurl) that issues requests for the A and AAAA records of a given host name from the given DOH URI.

Why HTTPS

Some people giggle and think of this as a massive layer violation. Maybe it is, but doing DNS over HTTPS makes a lot of sense compared to for example using plain TLS:

  1. We get transparent and proxy support "for free"
  2. We get multiplexing and the use of persistent connections from the get go (this can be supported by DNS-over-TLS too, depending on the implementation)
  3. Server push is a potential real performance booster
  4. Browsers often already have a lot of existing HTTPS connections to the same CDNs that might offer DOH.

Further explained in Patrick Mcmanus' The Benefits of HTTPS for DNS.

It still leaks the SNI!

Yes, the Server Name Indication field in the TLS handshake is still clear-text, but we hope to address that as well in the future with efforts like encrypted SNI.

Bugs?

File bug reports in Bugzilla! (in "Core->Networking:DNS" please)

If you want to enable HTTP logging and see what TRR is doing, set the environment variable MOZ_LOG component and level to "nsHostResolver:5". The TRR implementation source code in Firefox lives in netwerk/dns.

Caveats

Credits

While I have written most of the Firefox TRR implementation, I've been greatly assisted by Patrick Mcmanus. Valentin Gosu, Nick Hurley and others in the Firefox Necko team.

DOH in curl?

Since I am also the lead developer of curl people have asked. The work on DOH for curl has not really started yet, but I've collected some thoughts on how DNS-over-HTTPS could be implemented in curl and the doh tool I mentioned above has the basic function blocks already written.

Other efforts to enhance DNS security

There have been other DNS-over-HTTPS protocols and efforts. Recently there was one offered by at least Google that was a JSON style API. That's different.

There's also DNS-over-TLS which shares some of the DOH characteristics, but lacks for example the nice ability to work through proxies, do multiplexing and share existing connections with standard web traffic.

DNScrypt is an older effort that encrypts regular DNS packets and sends them over UDP or TCP.

curl, http2 and quic on the Changelog

Three years ago I talked on a changelog episode about curl just having turned 17 years old and what it has meant for me etc.

Fast forward three years, 146 changelog episodes later and now curl has turned 20 years and I was again invited and joined the lovely hosts of the changelog podcast, Adam and Jerod.

Changelog episode 299

We talked curl of course but we also spent time talking about where HTTP/2 is and how QUIC is coming around and a little about why and how its UDP nature makes things a little different. If you're into either curl or web transport, I hope you'll find it interesting.

The curl 7 series reaches 60

curl 7.60.0 is released. Remember 7.59.0? This latest release cycle was a week longer than normal since the last was one week shorter and we had this particular release date adapted to my traveling last week. It gave us 63 days to cram things in, instead of the regular 56 days.

7.60.0 is a crazy version number in many ways. We've been working on the version 7 series since virtually forever (the year 2000) and there's no version 8 in sight any time soon. This is the 174th curl release ever.

I believe we shouldn't allow the minor number to go above 99 (because I think it will cause serious confusion among users) so we should come up with a scheme to switch to version 8 before 7.99.0 gets old. If we keeping doing a new minor version every eight weeks, which seems like the fastest route, math tells us that's a mere 6 years away.

Numbers

In the 63 days since the previous release, we have done and had..

3 changes
111 bug fixes (total: 4,450)
166 commits (total: 23,119)
2 new curl_easy_setopt() options (total: 255)

1 new curl command line option (total: 214)
64 contributors, 36 new (total: 1,741)
42 authors (total: 577)
2 security fixes (total: 80)

What good does 7.60.0 bring?

Our tireless and fierce army of security researches keep hammering away at every angle of our code and this has again unveiled vulnerabilities in previously released curl code:

  1. FTP shutdown response buffer overflow: CVE-2018-1000300

When you tell libcurl to use a larger buffer size, that larger buffer size is not used for the shut down of an FTP connection so if the server then sends back a huge response during that sequence, it would buffer-overflow a heap based buffer.

2. RTSP bad headers buffer over-read: CVE-2018-1000301

The header parser function would sometimes not restore a pointer back to the beginning of the buffer, which could lead to a subsequent function reading out of buffer and causing a crash or potential information leak.

There are also two new features introduced in this version:

HAProxy protocol support

HAProxy has pioneered this simple protocol for clients to pass on meta-data to the server about where it comes from; designed to allow systems to chain proxies / reverse-proxies without losing information about the original originating client. Now you can make your libcurl-using application switch this on with CURLOPT_HAPROXYPROTOCOL and from the command line with curl's new --haproxy-protocol option.

Shuffling DNS addresses

Over six years ago, I blogged on how round robin DNS doesn't really work these days. Once upon the time the gethostbyname() family of functions actually returned addresses in a sort of random fashion, which made clients use them in an almost random fashion and therefore they were spread out on the different addresses. When getaddrinfo() has taken over as the name resolving function, it also introduced address sorting and prioritizing, in a way that effectively breaks the round robin approach.

Now, you can get this feature back with libcurl. Set CURLOPT_DNS_SHUFFLE_ADDRESSES to have the list of addresses shuffled after resolved, before they're used. If you're connecting to a service that offer several IP addresses and you want to connect to one of those addresses in a semi-random fashion, this option is for you.

There's no command line option to switch this on. Yet.

Bug fixes

We did many bug fixes for this release as usual, but some of my favorite ones this time around are...

improved pending transfers for HTTP/2

libcurl-using applications that add more transfers than what can be sent over the wire immediately (usually because the application as set some limitation of the parallelism libcurl will do) can be held "pending" by libcurl. They're basically kept in a separate queue until there's a chance to send them off. They will then be attempted to get started when the streams than are in progress end.

The algorithm for retrying the pending transfers were quite naive and "brute-force" which made it terribly slow and in effective when there are many transfers waiting in the pending queue. This slowed down the transfers unnecessarily.

With the fixes we've landed in7.60.0, the algorithm is less stupid which leads to much less overhead and for this setup, much faster transfers.

curl_multi_timeout values with threaded resolver

When using a libcurl version that is built to use a threaded resolver, there's no socket to wait for during the name resolving phase so we've often recommended users to just wait "a short while" during this interval. That has always been a weakness and an unfortunate situation.

Starting now, curl_multi_timeout() will return suitable timeout values during this period so that users will no longer have to re-implement that logic themselves. The timeouts will be slowly increasing to make sure fast resolves are detected quickly but slow resolves don't consume too much CPU.

much faster cookies

The cookie code in libcurl was keeping them all in a linear linked list. That's fine for small amounts of cookies or perhaps if you don't manipulate them much.

Users with several hundred cookies, or even thousands, will in 7.60.0 notice a speed increase that in some situations are in the order of several magnitudes when the internal representation has changed to use hash tables and some good cleanups were made.

HTTP/2 GOAWAY-handling

We figure out some problems in libcurl's handling of GOAWAY, like when an application wants to do a bunch of transfers over a connection that suddenly gets a GOAWAY so that libcurl needs to create a new connection to do the rest of the pending transfers over.

Turns out nginx ships with a config option named http2_max_requests that sets the maximum number of requests it allows over the same connection before it sends GOAWAY over it (and it defaults to 1000). This option isn't very well explained in their docs and it seems users won't really know what good values to set it to, so this is probably the primary reason clients see GOAWAYs where there's no apparent good reason for them.

Setting the value to a ridiculously low value at least helped me debug this problem and improve how libcurl deals with it!

Repair non-ASCII support

We've supported transfers with libcurl on non-ASCII platforms since early 2007. Non-ASCII here basically means EBCDIC, but the code hasn't been limited to those.

However, due to this being used by only a small amount of users and that our test infrastructure doesn't test this feature good enough, we slipped recently and broke libcurl for the non-ASCII users. Work was put in and changes were landed to make sure that libcurl works again on these systems!

Enjoy 7.60.0! In 56 days there should be another release to play with...

curl user survey 2018

The curl user survey 2018 is up. If you ever use curl or libcurl, please donate some of your precious time and provide your answers!

The curl user survey is an annual tradition since 2014 and it is one of our primary ways to get direct feedback from a larger audience about what's good, what's bad and what to focus on next in the curl project. Your input really helps us!

2018 survey

The survey will be up and available to fill in during 14 days, from May 15th until the end of May 28th. Please help us share this and ask your curl using friends to join in as well.

If you submitted data last year, make sure you didn't miss the analysis of the 2017 survey.

Now at 1000 mbit

A little over six years since I got the fiber connection installed to my house. Back then, on a direct question to my provider, they could only offer 100/100 mbit/sec so that's what I went with. Using my Telia Öppen Fiber and Tyfon (subsequently bought by Bahnhof) as internet provider.

In the spring of 2017 I bumped the speed to 250/100 mbit/sec to see if I would notice and actually take advantage of the extra speed. Lo and behold, I actually feel and experience the difference - frequently. When I upgrade my Linux machines or download larger images over the Internet, I frequently do that at higher speeds than 10MB/sec now and thus my higher speed saves me time and offers improved convenience.

However, "Öppen Fiber" is a relatively expensive provider for little gain for me. The "openness" that allows me to switch between providers isn't really something that gives much benefit once you've picked a provider you like, it's then mostly a way for a middle man to get an extra cut. 250mbit/sec from Bahnhof cost me 459 SEK/month (55 USD) there.

Switching to Bahnhof to handle both the fiber and the Internet connection is a much better deal for me, price wise. I get an upgraded connection to a 1000/1000 mbit/sec for a lower monthly fee. I'll now end up paying 399/month (48 USD)  (299 SEK/month the first 24 months). So slightly cheaper for much more speed!

My household typically consists of the following devices that are used for accessing the web regularly:

  • 4 smart phones
  • 1 iPad
  • 4 laptops
  • 3 desktop computers
  • 1 TV computer

Our family of 4 consumes around 120GB average weeks. Out of this, Youtube is the single biggest hogger with almost 30% of our total bandwidth. I suppose this says something about the habits of my kids...

Out of these 13 most frequently used devices in our local network only 5 are RJ45-connected, the rest are WiFi.

Switch-over

I was told the switch-over day was May 15th, and at 08:28 in the morning my existing connection went away. I took that as the start signal. I had already gotten a box from Bahnhof with the new media converter to use.

I went downstairs and started off my taking a photo of the existing installation...

So I unscrewed that old big thing from the wall and now my installation instead looks like

You can also see the Ethernet cable already jacked in.

Once connected, I got a link at once and then I spent another few minutes to try to "register" with my user name and password until I figured out that my router has 1.1.1.1 hardcoded as DNS server and once I cleared that, the login-thing worked as it should and I could tell Bahnhof that I'm a legitimate user and woof, my mosh session magically reconnected again etc.

All in all, I was offline for shorter than 30 minutes.

Speeds and round-trips

These days a short round-trip is all the rage and is often more important than high bandwidth when browsing the web. I'm apparently pretty close to the Stockholm hub for many major services and I was a bit curious how my new operator would compare.

To my amazement, it's notably faster. google.com went from 2.3ms to 1.3ms ping time, 1.1.1.1 is at 1.3ms, facebook.com is 1.0ms away.  My own server is 1.2ms away and amusingly even if I'm this close to the main server hosting the curl web site, the fastly CDN still outperforms it so curl.haxx.se is an average 1.0ms from me.

So, the ping times were notably reduced. The bandwidth is truly at gigabit speeds in both directions according to bredbandskollen.se, which is probably the most suitable speed check site in Sweden.

A rather smooth change so far. Let's hope it stays this way.

Would you like some bold with those headers?

Displaying HTTP headers for a URL on the screen is one of those things people commonly use curl for.

curl -I example.com

To help your eyes separate header names from the corresponding values, I've been experimenting with a change that makes the header names get shown using a bold type face and the header values to the right of the colons to use the standard font.

Sending a HEAD request to the curl site could look like this:

This seemingly small change required an unexpectedly large surgery.

Now I want to turn this into a discussion if this is good enough, if we need more customization, how to make the code act on windows and perhaps how an option to explicitly enable/disable this should be named.

If you have ideas for any of that or other things around this feature, do comment in the PR.

The feature window for the next curl release is already closed so this change will not be considered for real until curl 7.61.0 at the earliest. Due for release in July 2018. So lots of time left to really "bike shed" all the details!

Update: the PR was merged into master on May 21st.

curl up 2018 summary

curl up 2018

The event that occurred this past weekend was the second time we gathered a bunch of curl enthusiasts and developers in the same physical room to discuss the past, the present and the future from a curl perspective.

Stockholm, Sweden, was the center of gravity this time when Goto 10 hosted our merry collective. Spring has finally arrived here and as the sun was out a lot, it made it a lovely weekend weather wise too. As a bonus, the little coffee shop on the premises was open all through both days. Just for us!

This time we were 22 peeps coming in from Sweden, Germany, UK, Spain, the US, and Czechia.

This is what it looked like (photos by me):

Talks

We had a bunch of presentations over the two days, done by a bunch of people. I recorded the screens and recorded the voice on most of them, and they're available online. (Apologies for only recording a part of the screen for many of them!)

The talks were around how things work in curl or in the curl project, how people have used curl and a bit about upcoming technologies that we hope to get curl to support (soon?): QUIC, DOH, Alt-Svc, tests, CI, proxies, libcurl in Apache, using curl on a CDN, fuzzing curl, parsing email with curl etc.

Quiz

We rounded off the Saturday with a twelve question curl quiz. The winner, Fernando, managed to hit the right answer in 8 questions and did it faster than the competition. He got himself a signed copy of Everything curl the second print edition as a prize!

Sponsors

46 Elks was graciously sponsoring us with awesome food and t-shirts.

Sticker Mule provided us with stickers.

Goto 10 let us occupy their place during the weekend when it is otherwise closed!

This event was possible only thanks to their help!

2019

Several people asked me about next year already. I certainly hope we can run another curl up in 2019, but I don't know yet where this should happen. Ideally, I would like to move it around to different countries to give different people the ability to show up easier, but I also value having a local "host" that can provide the room and facilities for us. I'll send out probing questions about the 2019 location later this year. If you have a usable office or another suitable place that could host us, (preferably outside of Germany or Sweden), feel most welcome and encouraged to contact me!

(me, photographed by Christian Schmitz)

curl another host

Sometimes you want to issue a curl command against a server, but you don't really want curl to resolve the host name in the given URL and use that, you want to tell it to go elsewhere. To the "wrong" host, which in this case of course happens to be the right host. Because you know better.

Don't worry. curl covers this as well, in several different ways...

Fake the host header

The classic and and easy to understand way to send a request to the wrong HTTP host is to simply send a different Host: header so that the server will provide a response for that given server.

If you run your "example.com" HTTP test site on localhost and want to verify that it works:

curl --header "Host: example.com" http://127.0.0.1/

curl will also make cookies work for example.com in this case, but it will fail miserably if the page redirects to another host and you enable redirect-following (--location) since curl will send the fake Host: header in all further requests too.

The --header option cleverly cancels the built-in provided Host: header when a custom one is provided so only the one passed in from the user gets sent in the request.

Fake the host header better

We're using HTTPS everywhere these days and just faking the Host: header is not enough then. An HTTPS server also needs to get the server name provided already in the TLS handshake so that it knows which cert etc to use. The name is provided in the SNI field. curl also needs to know the correct host name to verify the server certificate against (server certificates are rarely registered for an IP address). curl extracts the name to use in both those case from the provided URL.

As we can't just put the IP address in the URL for this to work, we reverse the approach and instead give curl the proper URL but with a custom IP address to use for the host name we set. The --resolve command line option is our friend:

curl --resolve example.com:443:127.0.0.1 https://example.com/

Under the hood this option populates curl's DNS cache with a custom entry for "example.com" port 443 with the address 127.0.0.1, so when curl wants to connect to this host name, it finds your crafted address and connects to that instead of the IP address a "real" name resolve would otherwise return.

This method also works perfectly when following redirects since any further use of the same host name will still resolve to the same IP address and redirecting to another host name will then resolve properly. You can even use this option multiple times on the command line to add custom addresses for several names. You can also add multiple IP addresses for each name if you want to.

Connect to another host by name

As shown above, --resolve is awesome if you want to point curl to a specific known IP address. But sometimes that's not exactly what you want either.

Imagine you have a host name that resolves to a number of different host names, possibly a number of front end servers for the same site/service. Not completely unheard of. Now imagine you want to issue your curl command to one specific server out of the front end servers. It's a server that serves "example.com" but the individual server is called "host-47.example.com".

You could resolve the host name in a first step before curl is used and use --resolve as shown above.

Or you can use --connect-to, which instead works on a host name basis. Using this, you can make curl replace a specific host name + port number pair with another host name + port number pair before the name is resolved!

curl --connect-to example.com:443:host-47.example.com:443 https://example.com/

Crazy combos

Most options in curl are individually controlled which means that there's rarely logic that prevents you from using them in the awesome combinations that you can think of.

-- resolve, -- connect-to and -- header can all be used in the same command line!

Connect to a HTTPS host running on localhost, use the correct name for SNI and certificate verification, but then still ask for a separate host in the Host: header? Sure, no problem:

curl --resolve example.com:443:127.0.0.1 https://example.com/ --header "Host: diff.example.com"

All the above with libcurl?

When you're done playing with the curl options as described above and want to convert your command lines to libcurl code instead, your best friend is called --libcurl.

Just append --libcurl example.c to your command line, and curl will generate the C code template for you in that given file name. Based on that template, making use of  that code correctly is usually straight-forward and you'll get all the options to read up in a convenient way.

Good luck!

Update: thanks to @Manawyrm, I fixed the ndash issues this post originally had.

Play TLS 1.3 with curl

The IESG recently approved the TLS 1.3 draft-28 for proposed standard and we can expect the real RFC for this protocol version to appear soon (within a few months probably).

TLS 1.3 has been in development for quite some time by now, and a lot of TLS libraries already support it to some extent. At varying draft levels.

curl and libcurl has supported an explicit option to select TLS 1.3 since curl 7.52.0 (December 2016) and assuming you build curl to use a TLS library with support, you've been able to use TLS 1.3 with curl since at least then. The support has gradually been expanded to cover more and more libraries since then.

Today, curl and libcurl support speaking TLS 1.3 if you build it to use one of these fine TLS libraries of a recent enough version:

  • OpenSSL
  • BoringSSL
  • libressl
  • NSS
  • WolfSSL
  • Secure Transport (on iOS 11 or later, and macOS 10.13 or later)

GnuTLS seems to be well on their way too. TLS 1.3 support exists in the GnuTLS master branch on gitlab.

curl's TLS 1.3-support makes it possible to select TLS 1.3 as preferred minimum version.