Tag Archives: OpenSSL

Get the CA cert for curl

When you use curl to communicate with a HTTPS site (or any other protocol that uses TLS), it will by default verify that the server is signed by a trusted Certificate Authority (CA). It does this by checking the CA bundle it was built to use, or instructed to use with the –cacert command line option.

Sometimes you end up in a situation where you don’t have the necessary CA cert in your bundle. It could then look something like this:

$ curl https://example.com/
curl: (60) SSL certificate problem: self signed certificate
More details here: https://curl.haxx.se/docs/sslcerts.html

Do not disable!

A first gut reaction could be to disable the certificate check. Don’t do that. You’ll just make that end up in production or get copied by someone else and then you’ll spread the insecure use to other places and eventually cause a security problem.

Get the CA cert

I’ll show you four different ways to fix this.

1. Update your OS CA store

Operating systems come with a CA bundle of their own and on most of them, curl is setup to use the system CA store. A system update often makes curl work again.

This of course doesn’t help you if you have a self-signed certificate or otherwise use a CA that your operating system doesn’t have in its trust store.

2. Get an updated CA bundle from us

curl can be told to use a separate stand-alone file as CA store, and conveniently enough curl provides an updated one on the curl web site. That one is automatically converted from the one Mozilla provides for Firefox, updated daily. It also provides a little backlog so the ten most recent CA stores are available.

If you agree to trust the same CAs that Firefox trusts. This is a good choice.

3. Get it with openssl

Now we’re approaching the less good options. It’s way better to get the CA certificates via other means than from the actual site you’re trying to connect to!

This method uses the openssl command line tool. The servername option used below is there to set the SNI field, which often is necessary to tell the server which actual site’s certificate you want.

$ echo quit | openssl s_client -showcerts -servername server -connect server:443 > cacert.pem

A real world example, getting the certs for daniel.haxx.se and then getting the main page with curl using them:

$ echo quit | openssl s_client -showcerts -servername daniel.haxx.se -connect daniel.haxx.se:443 > cacert.pem

$ curl --cacert cacert.pem https://daniel.haxx.se
4. Get it with Firefox

Suppose you’re browsing the site already fine with Firefox. Then you can do inspect it using the browser and export to use with curl.

Step 1 – click the i in the circle on the left of the URL in the address bar of your browser.

Step 2 – click the right arrow on the right side in the drop-down window that appeared.

Step 3 – new contents appeared, now click the “More Information” at the bottom, which pops up a new separate window…

Step 4 – Here you get security information from Firefox about the site you’re visiting. Click the “View Certificate” button on the right. It pops up yet another separate window.

Step 5 – in this window full of certificate information, select the “Details” tab…

Step 6 – when switched to the details tab, there’s the certificate hierarchy shown at the top and we select the top choice there. This list will of course look different for different sites

Step 7 – now click the “Export” tab at the bottom left and save the file (that uses a .crt extension) somewhere suitable.

If you for example saved the exported certificate using in /tmp, you could then use curl with that saved certificate something like this:

$ curl --cacert /tmp/GlobalSignRootCA-R3.crt https://curl.haxx.se

But I’m not using openssl!

This description assumes you’re using a curl that uses a CA bundle in the PEM format, which not all do – in particular not the ones built with NSS, Schannel (native Windows) or Secure Transport (native macOS and iOS) don’t.

If you use one of those, you need to then add additional command to import the PEM formatted cert into the particular CA store of yours.

A CA store is many PEM files concatenated

Just concatenate many different PEM files into a single file to create a CA store with multiple certificates.

Play TLS 1.3 with curl

The IESG recently approved the TLS 1.3 draft-28 for proposed standard and we can expect the real RFC for this protocol version to appear soon (within a few months probably).

TLS 1.3 has been in development for quite some time by now, and a lot of TLS libraries already support it to some extent. At varying draft levels.

curl and libcurl has supported an explicit option to select TLS 1.3 since curl 7.52.0 (December 2016) and assuming you build curl to use a TLS library with support, you’ve been able to use TLS 1.3 with curl since at least then. The support has gradually been expanded to cover more and more libraries since then.

Today, curl and libcurl support speaking TLS 1.3 if you build it to use one of these fine TLS libraries of a recent enough version:

  • OpenSSL
  • BoringSSL
  • libressl
  • NSS
  • WolfSSL
  • Secure Transport (on iOS 11 or later, and macOS 10.13 or later)

GnuTLS seems to be well on their way too. TLS 1.3 support exists in the GnuTLS master branch on gitlab.

curl’s TLS 1.3-support makes it possible to select TLS 1.3 as preferred minimum version.

Inspect curl’s TLS traffic

Since a long time back, the venerable network analyzer tool Wireshark (screenshot above) has provided a way to decrypt and inspect TLS traffic when sent and received by Firefox and Chrome.

You do this by making the browser tell Wireshark the SSL secrets:

  1. set the environment variable named SSLKEYLOGFILE to a file name of your choice before you start the browser
  2. Setting the same file name path in the Master-secret field in Wireshark. Go to Preferences->Protocols->SSL and edit the path as shown in the screenshot below.

Having done this simple operation, you can now inspect your browser’s HTTPS traffic in Wireshark. Just super handy and awesome.

Just remember that if you record TLS traffic and want to save it for analyzing later, you need to also save the file with the secrets so that you can decrypt that traffic capture at a later time as well.

curl

Adding curl to the mix. curl can be built using a dozen different TLS libraries and not just a single one as the browsers do. It complicates matters a bit.

In the NSS library for example, which is the TLS library curl is typically built with on Redhat and Centos, handles the SSLKEYLOGFILE magic all by itself so by extension you have been able to do this trick with curl for a long time – as long as you use curl built with NSS. A pretty good argument to use that build really.

Since curl version 7.57.0 the SSLKEYLOGFILE feature can also be enabled when built with GnuTLS, BoringSSL or OpenSSL. In the latter two libs, the feature is powered by new APIs in those libraries and in GnuTLS the library’s own logic similar to how NSS does it. Since OpenSSL is the by far most popular TLS backend for curl, this feature is now brought to users more widely.

In curl 7.58.0 (due to ship on Janurary 24, 2018), this feature is built by default also for curl with OpenSSL and in 7.57.0 you need to define ENABLE_SSLKEYLOGFILE to enable it for OpenSSL and BoringSSL.

And what’s even cooler? This feature is at the same time also brought to every single application out there that is built against this or later versions of libcurl. In one single blow. now suddenly a whole world opens to make it easier for you to debug, diagnose and analyze your applications’ TLS traffic when powered by libcurl!

Like the description above for browsers, you

  1. set the environment variable SSLKEYLOGFILE to a file name to store the secrets in
  2. tell Wireshark to use that same file to find the TLS secrets (Preferences->Protocols->SSL), as the screenshot showed above
  3. run the libcurl-using application (such as curl) and Wireshark will be able to inspect TLS-based protocols just fine!

trace options

Of course, as a light weight alternative: you may opt to use the –trace or –trace-ascii options with the curl tool and be fully satisfied with that. Using those command line options, curl will log everything sent and received in the protocol layer without the TLS applied. With HTTPS you’ll see all the HTTP traffic for example.

Credits

Most of the curl work to enable this feature was done by Peter Wu and Ray Satiro.

curl and h2 on mac

$ curl ‐‐http2 https://daniel.haxx.se/
curl: (1) Unsupported protocol

curl on mac

curcurl-symboll has been shipped by default on Mac OS X since many years – I actually couldn’t even manage to figure out exactly how many. It is built and bundled with the operating system by Apple itself and on Apple’s own terms and even though I’m the main curl developer I’ve never discussed this with them or even been asked or told about their plans. I’m not complaining, our license allows this and I’m nothing but happy with them shipping curl to millions of Mac users.

Leaving OpenSSL

osxOriginally, curl on Mac was built against OpenSSL for the TLS and SSL support, but over time our friends at Apple have switched more and more of their software over to use their own TLS and crypto library Secure Transport instead of OpenSSL. A while ago Apple started bundling curl built to use the native mac TLS library instead of OpenSSL.

As you may know, when you build curl you can select from eleven different TLS libraries and one of them of course is Secure Transport. Support for this TLS back-end in curl was written by curl hackers, but it apparently got to a quality level good enough for Apple to decide to build curl with this back-end and ship it like that.

The Secure Transport back-end is rather capable and generally doesn’t cause many reasons for concern. There’s however one notable little glitch that people keep asking me about…

curl doesn’t support HTTP/2 on mac!

There are two obvious reasons why not, and they are:

1. No ALPN with Secure Transport

Secure Transport doesn’t offer any public API to enable HTTP/2 with ALPN when speaking HTTPS. Sure, we know Apple supports HTTP/2 already in several other aspects in their ecosystem and we can check their open code so we know there’s support for HTTP/2 and ALPN. There’s just no official APIs for us to use to switch it on!

So, if you insist on building curl to use Secure Transport instead of one of the many alternatives that actually support ALPN just fine, then you can’t negotiate HTTP/2 over TLS!

2. No nghttp2 with Mac OS

Even without ALPN support, you could actually still negotiate HTTP/2 over plain text TCP connections if you have a server that supports it. But even then curl depends on the awesome nghttp2 library to provide the frame level protocol encoding/decoding and more. If Apple would decide to enable HTTP/2 support for curl on Mac OS, they need to build it against nghttp2. I really think they should.

Homebrew and friends to the rescue!

Correct. You can still install your own separate curl binary (and libcurl library) from other sources, like for example Homebrew or Macports and they do offer versions built against other TLS back-ends and nghttp2 and then of course HTTP/2 works just fine with curl on mac.

Did I file a bug with Apple?

No, but I know for certain that there has been a bug report filed by someone else. Unfortunately it isn’t public so I can’t link nor browse it.

What’s new in curl

CURL keyboardWe just shipped our 150th public release of curl. On December 2, 2015.

curl 7.46.0

One hundred and fifty public releases done during almost 18 years makes a little more than 8 releases per year on average. In mid November 2015 we also surpassed 20,000 commits in the git source code repository.

With the constant and never-ending release train concept of just another release every 8 weeks that we’re using, no release is ever the grand big next release with lots of bells and whistles. Instead we just add a bunch of things, fix a bunch of bugs, release and then loop. With no fanfare and without any press-stopping marketing events.

So, instead of just looking at what was made in this last release, because you can check that out yourself in our changelog, I wanted to take a look at the last two years and have a moment to show you want we have done in this period. curl and libcurl are the sort of tool and library that people use for a long time and a large number of users have versions installed that are far older than two years and hey, now I’d like to tease you and tell you what can be yours if you take the step straight into the modern day curl or libcurl.

Thanks

Before we dive into the real contents, let’s not fool ourselves and think that we managed these years and all these changes without the tireless efforts and contributions from hundreds of awesome hackers. Thank you everyone! I keep calling myself lead developer of curl but it truly would not not exist without all the help I get.

We keep getting a steady stream of new contributors and quality patches. Our problem is rather to review and receive the contributions in a timely manner. In a personal view, I would also like to just add that during these two last years I’ve had support from my awesome employer Mozilla that allows me to spend a part of my work hours on curl.

What happened the last 2 years in curl?

We released curl and libcurl 7.34.0 on December 17th 2013 (12 releases ago). What  did we do since then that could be worth mentioning? Well, a lot, and then I’m going to mostly skip the almost 900 bug fixes we did in this time.

Many security fixes

Almost half (18 out of 37) of the security vulnerabilities reported for our project were reported during the last two years. It may suggest a greater focus and more attention put on those details by users and developers. Security reports are a good thing, it means that we address and find problems. Yes it unfortunately also shows that we introduce security issues at times, but I consider that secondary, even if we of course also work on ways to make sure we’ll do this less in the future.

URL specific options: –next

A pretty major feature that was added to the command line tool without much bang or whistles. You can now add –next as a separator on the command line to “group” options for specific URLs. This allows you to run multiple different requests on URLs that still can re-use the same connection and so on. It opens up for lots of more fun and creative uses of curl and has in fact been requested on and off for the project’s entire life time!

HTTP/2

There’s a new protocol version in town and during the last two years it was finalized and its RFC went public. curl and libcurl supports HTTP/2, although you need to explicitly ask for it to be used still.

HTTP/2 is binary, multiplexed, uses compressed headers and offers server push. Since the command line tool is still serially sending and receiving data, the multiplexing and server push features can right now only get fully utilized by applications that use libcurl directly.

HTTP/2 in curl is powered by the nghttp2 library and it requires a fairly new TLS library that supports the ALPN extension to be fully usable for HTTPS. Since the browsers only support HTTP/2 over HTTPS, most HTTP/2 in the wild so far is done over HTTPS.

We’ve gradually implemented and provided more and more HTTP/2 features.

Separate proxy headers

For a very long time, there was no way to tell curl which custom headers to use when talking to a proxy and which to use when talking to the server. You’d just add a custom header to the request. This was never good and we eventually made it possible to specify them separately and then after the security alert on the same thing, we made it the default behavior.

Option man pages

We’ve had two user surveys as we now try to make it an annual spring tradition for the project. To learn what people use, what people think, what people miss etc. Both surveys have told us users think our documentation needs improvement and there has since been an extra push towards improving the documentation to make it more accessible and more readable.

One way to do that, has been to introduce separate, stand-alone, versions of man pages for each and very libcurl option. For the functions curl_easy_setopt, curl_multi_setopt and curl_easy_getinfo. Right now, that means 278 new man pages that are easier to link directly to, easier to search for with Google etc and they are now written with more text and more details for each individual option. In total, we now host and maintain 351 individual man pages.

The boringssl / libressl saga

The Heartbleed incident of April 2014 was a direct reason for libressl being created as a new fork of OpenSSL and I believe it also helped BoringSSL to find even more motivation for its existence.

Subsequently, libcurl can be built to use either one of these three forks based on the same origin.  This is however not accomplished without some amount of agony.

SSLv3 is also disabled by default

The continued number of problems detected in SSLv3 finally made it too get disabled by default in curl (together with SSLv2 which has been disabled by default for a while already). Now users need to explicitly ask for it in case they need it, and in some cases the TLS libraries do not even support them anymore. You may need to build your own binary to get the support back.

Everyone should move up to TLS 1.2 as soon as possible. HTTP/2 also requires TLS 1.2 or later when used over HTTPS.

support for the SMB/CIFS protocol

For the first time in many years we’ve introduced support for a new protocol, using the SMB:// and SMBS:// schemes. Maybe not the most requested feature out there, but it is another network protocol for transfers…

code of conduct

Triggered by several bad examples in other projects, we merged a code of conduct document into our source tree without much of a discussion, because this is the way this project always worked. This just makes it clear to newbies and outsiders in case there would ever be any doubt. Plus it offers a clear text saying what’s acceptable or not in case we’d ever come to a point where that’s needed. We’ve never needed it so far in the project’s very long history.

–data-raw

Just a tiny change but more a symbol of the many small changes and advances we continue doing. The –data option that is used to specify what to POST to a server can take a leading ‘@’ symbol and then a file name, but that also makes it tricky to actually send a literal ‘@’ plus it makes scripts etc forced to make sure it doesn’t slip in one etc.

–data-raw was introduced to only accept a string to send, without any ability to read from a file and not using ‘@’ for anything. If you include a ‘@’ in that string, it will be sent verbatim.

attempting VTLS as a lib

We support eleven different TLS libraries in the curl project – that is probably more than all other transfer libraries in existence do. The way we do this is by providing an internal API for TLS backends, and we call that ‘vtls’.

In 2015 we started made an effort in trying to make that into its own sub project to allow other open source projects and tools to use it. We managed to find a few hackers from the wget project also interested and to participate. Unfortunately I didn’t feel I could put enough effort or time into it to drive it forward much and while there was some initial work done by others it soon was obvious it wouldn’t go anywhere and we pulled the plug.

The internal vtls glue remains fine though!

pull-requests on github

Not really a change in the code itself but still a change within the project. In March 2015 we changed our policy regarding pull-requests done on github. The effect has been a huge increase in number of pull-requests and a slight shift in activity away from the mailing list over to github more. I think it has made it easier for casual contributors to send enhancements to the project but I don’t have any hard facts backing this up (and I wouldn’t know how to measure this).

… as mentioned in the beginning, there have also been hundreds of smaller changes and bug fixes. What fun will you help us make reality in the next two years?

The TLS trinity dance

In the curl project we currently support eleven different TLS libraries. That is 8 libraries and the OpenSSL “trinity” consisting of BoringSSL, libressl and of course OpenSSL itself.

You could easily be mislead into believing that supporting three libraries that all have a common base would be reallytrinity easy since they have the same API. But no, it isn’t. Sure, they have the same foundation and they all three have more in common that they differ but still, they all diverge in their own little ways and from my stand-point libressl seems to be the one that causes us the least friction going forward.

Let me also stress that I’m but a user of these projects, I don’t participate in their work and I don’t have any insights into their internal doings or greater goals.

libressl

Easy-peacy, very similar to OpenSSL. The biggest obstacle might be that the version numbering is different so an old program that might be adjusted to different OpenSSL features based on version numbers (like curl was) needs some adjusting. There’s a convenient LIBRESSL_VERSION_NUMBER define to detect libressl with.

OpenSSL

I regularly build curl against OpenSSL from their git master to get an early head-start when they change things and break backwards compatibility. They’ve increased that behavior since Heartbleed and while I generally agree with their ambitions on making more structs opaque instead of exposing all internals, it also hurts us over and over again when they remove things we’ve been using for years. What’s “funny” is that in almost all cases, their response is “well use this way instead” and it has turned out that there’s an equally old API that is still there that we can use instead. It also tells something about their documentation situation when that is such a common pattern. It’s never been possible to grasp this from just reading docs.

BoringSSL

BoringSSL has made great inroads in the market and is used on Android now and more. They don’t do releases(!) and have no version numbers so the only thing we can do is to build from git and there’s no install target in the makefile. There’s no docs for it, they remove APIs from OpenSSL (curl can’t support NTLM nor OCSP stapling when built with it), they’ve changed several data types in the API making it really hard to build curl without warnings. Funnily, they also introduced non-namespaced typedefs prefixed with X509_* that collide with other common headers.

How it can play out in real life

A while ago we noticed BoringSSL had removed the DES_set_odd_parity function which we use in curl. We changed the configure script to look for it and changed the code to survive without it. The lack of that function then also signaled that it wasn’t OpenSSL, it was BoringSSL

BoringSSL moved around things that caused our configure script to no longer detect it as “OpenSSL compliant” because CRYPTO_lock could no longer be found by configure. We changed it to instead search for HMAC_Init and we were fine again.

Time passed and BoringSSL brought back DES_set_odd_parity, so our configure script no longer saw it as BoringSSL (the Android fixed this problem in their git but never sent as the fix). We changed the configure script accordingly to properly use OPENSSL_IS_BORINGSSL instead to detect BoringSSL which was the correct thing anyway and now as a bonus it can thus detect and work with both new and old BoringSSL versions.

A short time after, I again try to build curl against the OpenSSL master branch only to realize they’ve deprecated HMAC_Init that we just recently switched to for detection (since the configure script needs to check for a particular named function within a library to really know that it has detected and can use said library). Sigh, we switched “detect function” again to HMAC_Update. Hopefully this exists in all three and will stick around for a while…

Right now I think we can detect and use all three. It is only a matter of time until one of them will ruin that and we will adapt again.

libressl vs boringssl for curl

I tried to use two OpenSSL forks yesterday with curl. I built both from source first (of course, as I wanted the latest and greatest) an interesting thing in itself since both projects have modified the original build system so they’re now three different ways.

libressl 2.0.0 installed and built flawlessly with curl and I’ve pushed a change that shows LibreSSL instead of OpenSSL when doing curl -V etc.

boringssl didn’t compile from git until I had manually fixed a minor nit, and then it has no “make install” target at all so I had manually copy the libs and header files to a place suitable for curl’s configure to detect. Then the curl build failed because boringssl isn’t API compatiable with some of the really old DES stuff – code we use for NTLM. I asked Adam Langley about it and he told me that calling code using DES “needs a tweak” – but I haven’t yet walked down that road so I don’t know how much of a nuisance that actually is or isn’t.

Summary: as an openssl replacement, libressl wins this round over boringssl with 3 – 0.

http2 in curl

While the first traces of http2 support in curl was added already back in September 2013 it hasn’t been until recently it actually was made useful. There’s been a lot of http2 related activities in the curl team recently and in the late January 2014 we could run our first command line inter-op tests against public http2 (draft-09) servers on the Internet.

There’s a lot to be said about http2 for those not into its nitty gritty details, but I’ll focus on the curl side of this universe in this blog post. I’ll do separate posts and presentations on http2 “internals” later.

A quick http2 overview

http2 (without the minor version, as per what the IETF work group has decided on) is a binary protocol that allows many logical streams multiplexed over the same physical TCP connection, it features compressed headers in both directions and it has stream priorities and more. It is being designed to maintain the user concepts and paradigms from HTTP 1.1 so web sites don’t have to change contents and web authors won’t need to relearn a lot. The web will not break because of http2, it will just magically work a little better, a little smoother and a little faster.

In libcurl we build http2 support with the help of the excellent library called nghttp2, which takes care of all the binary protocol details for us. You’ll also have to build it with a new enough version of the SSL library of your choice, as http2 over TLS will require use of some fairly recent TLS extensions that not many older releases have and several TLS libraries still completely lack!

The need for an extension is because with speaking TLS over port 443 which HTTPS implies, the current and former web infrastructure assumes that we will speak HTTP 1.1 over that, while we now want to be able to instead say we want to talk http2. When Google introduced SPDY then pushed for a new extension called NPN to do this, which when taken through the standardization in IETF has been forked, changed and renamed to ALPN with roughly the same characteristics (I don’t know the specific internals so I’ll stick to how they appear from the outside).

So, NPN and especially ALPN are fairly recent TLS extensions so you need a modern enough SSL library to get that support. OpenSSL and NSS both support NPN and ALPN with a recent enough version, while GnuTLS only supports ALPN. You can build libcurl to use any of these threes libraries to get it to talk http2 over TLS.

http2 using libcurl

(This still describes what’s in curl’s git repository, the first release to have this level of http2 support is the upcoming 7.36.0 release.)

Users of libcurl who want to enable http2 support will only have to set CURLOPT_HTTP_VERSION to CURL_HTTP_VERSION_2_0 and that’s it. It will make libcurl try to use http2 for the HTTP requests you do with that handle.

For HTTP URLs, this will make libcurl send a normal HTTP 1.1 request with an offer to the server to upgrade the connection to version 2 instead. If it does, libcurl will continue using http2 in the clear on the connection and if it doesn’t, it’ll continue using HTTP 1.1 on it. This mode is what Firefox and Chrome will not support.

For HTTPS URLs, libcurl will use NPN and ALPN as explained above and offer to speak http2 and if the server supports it. there will be http2 sweetness from than point onwards. Or it selects HTTP 1.1 and then that’s what will be used. The latter is also what will be picked if the server doesn’t support ALPN and NPN.

Alt-Svc and ALTSVC are new things planned to show up in time for http2 draft-11 so we haven’t really thought through how to best support them and provide their features in the libcurl API. Suggestions (and patches!) are of course welcome!

http2 with curl

Hardly surprising, the curl command line tool also has this power. You use the –http2 command line option to switch on the libcurl behavior as described above.

Translated into old-style

To reduce transition pains and problems and to work with the rest of the world to the highest possible degree, libcurl will (decompress and) translate received http2 headers into http 1.1 style headers so that applications and users will get a stream of headers that look very much the way you’re used to and it will produce an initial response line that says HTTP 2.0 blabla.

Building (lib)curl to support http2

See the README.http2 file in the lib/ directory.

This is still a draft version of http2!

I just want to make this perfectly clear: http2 is not out “for real” yet. We have tried our http2 support somewhat at the draft-09 level and Tatsuhiro has worked on the draft-10 support in nghttp2. I expect there to be at least one more draft, but perhaps even more, before http2 becomes an official RFC. We hope to be able to stay on the frontier of http2 and deliver support for the most recent draft going forward.

PS. If you try any of this and experience any sort of problems, please speak to us on the curl-library mailing list and help us smoothen out whatever problem you got!

cURL

libcurl claimed to be dangerous

On October 24th, my twitter feed suddenly got more activity than usual when suddenly there’s a mention of a newly(?) published paper:

The most dangerous code in the world: validating SSL certificates in non-browser software

Within the twelve page document they discuss flaws in various APIs and other certificate checking software, and for libcurl they say:

Internally, it uses OpenSSL to verify the chain of trust and verifies the hostname itself. This functionality is controlled by parameters CURLOPT_SSL_VERIFYPEER (default value: true) and CURLOPT_SSL_VERIFYHOST (default value: 2). This interface is almost perversely bad. The VERIFYPEER parameter is a boolean, while a similar-looking VERIFYHOST parameter is an integer.

(The fact that libcurl supports no less than nine(!) different SSL library backends seems to have been ignored but is irrelevant.)

The final part is their focus. It is an integer option but it looks like it could be similar to the VERIFYPEER option which could be considered a boolean option – but note that there is no boolean options at all in libcurl, those are all “long” values. They go on to explain:

Well-intentioned developers not only routinely misunderstand these parameters, but often set CURLOPT_SSL_VERIFY HOST to TRUE, thereby changing it to 1 and thus accidentally isabling hostname verification with disastrous consequences

They back up their claim with some snippets from PHP programs showing wrong use in chapter 7.

What did the authors do to try to fix the problem before posting rude comments in a report? Nothing. At. All. They could’ve emailed, tweeted or posted a bug report or patch but none of that happened.

They also only post examples of the bad use made by PHP code. The PHP code uses the PHP/CURL binding and a change could easily be done in the PHP binding. I don’t know PHP internals, but perhaps the option could be made to not accept a boolean value instead of a numerical there.

We’re now discussing this topic on the libcurl mailing list. If you have ideas or suggestions or just comments, feel free to join in!

Oh, and I feel that my recent blog post on the non-verifying users seems related and relevant.

I will also call the majority of all these suddenly appearing complainers on this API to be mostly hypocrites since the API has been established and working like this for over a 10 (ten!) years and not a single person has objected to it before. Joining up on the “bandwagon” now and calling the API stupid or silly is… well, I’d call it “non-intelligent behavior”. In libcurl we take a stable and solid API and ABI very seriously. We simply do not break API nor ABI unless forced brutally into a corner we can’t escape otherwise. Therefore we have kept this API to keep existing applications functional.

Update: the discussion thread on the topic from the PHP-DEV list. Thanks to Jan Ehrhardt.

Second update: we shipped libcurl 7.28.1 on November 20 2012, and it no longer accepts the value 1 to VERIFYHOST, but will instead cause curl_easy_setopt() return an error and use the default value (which is 2). This will prevent applications to accidentally be insecure due to use of 1.

Is there a case for a unified SSL front?

There are many, sorry very many, different SSL libraries today that various programs may want to use. In the open source world at least, it is more and more common that SSL (and other crypto) using programs offer build options to build with either at least OpenSSL or GnuTLS and very often they also offer optinal build with NSS and possibly a few other SSL libraries.

In the curl project we just added support for library number nine. In the libcurl source code we have an internal API that each SSL library backend must provide, and all the libcurl source code is internally using only that single and fixed API to do SSL and crypto operations without even knowing which backend library that is actually providing the functionality. I talked about libcurl’s internal SSL API before, and I asked about this on the libcurl list back in Feb 2011.

So, a common problem should be able to find a common solution. What if we fixed this in a way that would be possible for many projects to re-use? What if one project’s ability to select from 9 different provider libraries could be leveraged by others. A single SSL API with a simplified API but that still provides the functionality most “simple” SSL-using applications need?

Marc Hörsken and I have discussed this a bit, and pidgin/libpurble came up as a possible contender that could use such a single SSL. I’ve also talked about it with Claes Jakobsson and Magnus Hagander for postgresql and I know since before that wget certainly could use it. When I’ve performed my talks on the seven SSL libraries of libcurl I’ve been approached by several people who have expressed a desire in seeing such an externalized API, and I remember the guys from cyassl among those. I’m sure there will be a few other interested parities as well if this takes off.

What remains to be answered is if it is possible to make it reality in a decent way.

Upsides:

  1. will reduce code from the libcurl code base – in the amount of 10K or more lines of C code, and it should be a decreased amount of “own” code for all projects that would decide to use thins single SSL library
  2. will allow other projects to use one out of many SSL libraries, hopefully benefiting end users as a result
  3. should get more people involved in the code as more projects would use it, hopefully ending up in better tested and polished source code

There are several downsides with a unified library, from the angle of curl/libcurl and myself:

  1. it will undoubtedly lead to more code being added and implemented that curl/libcurl won’t need or use, thus grow the code base and the final binary
  2. the API of the unified library won’t be possible to be as tightly integrated with the libcurl internals as it is today, so there will be some added code and logic needed
  3. it will require that we produce a lot of documentation for all the functions and structs in the API which takes time and effort
  4. the above mention points will deduct time from my other projects (hopefully to benefit others, but still)

Some problems that would have to dealt with:

  1. how to deal with libraries that don’t provide functionality that the single SSL API does
  2. how to draw the line of what functionality to offer in the API, as the individual libraries will always provide richer and more complete APIs
  3. What is actually needed to get the work on this started for real? And if we do, what would we call the project…

PS, I know the term is more accurately “TLS” these days but somehow people (me included) seem to have gotten stuck with the word SSL to cover both SSL and TLS…