Tag Archives: release-time

curl 7.49.0 goodies coming

Here's a closer look at three new features that we're shipping in curl and libcurl 7.49.0, to be released on May 18th 2016.

connect to this instead

If you're one of the users who thought --resolve and doing Host: header tricks with --header weren't good enough, you'll appreciate that we're adding yet another option for you to fiddle with the connection procedure. Another "Swiss army knife style" option for you who know what you're doing.

With --connect-to you basically provide an internal alias for a certain name + port to instead internally use another name + port to connect to.

Instead of connecting to HOST1:PORT1, connect to HOST2:PORT2

It is very similar to --resolve which is a way to say: when connecting to HOST1:PORT1 use this ADDR2:PORT2. --resolve effectively prepopulates the internal DNS cache and makes curl completely avoid the DNS lookup and instead feeds it with the IP address you'd like it to use.

--connect-to doesn't avoid the DNS lookup, but it will make sure that a different host name and destination port pair is used than what was found in the URL. A typical use case for this would be to make sure that your curl request asks a specific server out of several in a pool of many, where each has a unique name but you normally reach them with a single URL who's host name is otherwise load balanced.

--connect-to can be specified multiple times to add mappings for multiple names, so that even following HTTP redirects to other host names etc can be handled. You don't even necessarily have to redirect the first used host name.

The libcurl option name for for this feature is CURLOPT_CONNECT_TO.

Michael Kaufmann brought this feature.

http2 prior knowledge

In our ongoing quest to provide more and better HTTP/2 support in a world that is slowly but steadily doing more and more transfers over the new version of the protocol, curl now offers --http2-prior-knowledge.

As the name might hint, this is a way to tell curl that you have "prior knowledge" that the URL you specifies goes to a host that you know supports HTTP/2. The term prior knowledge is in fact used in the HTTP/2 spec (RFC 7540) for this scenario.

Normally when given a HTTP:// or a HTTPS:// URL, there will be no assumption that it supports HTTP/2 but curl when then try to upgrade that from version HTTP/1. The command line tool tries to upgrade all HTTPS:// URLs by default even, and libcurl can be told to do so.

libcurl wise, you ask for a prior knowledge use by setting CURLOPT_HTTP_VERSION to CURL_HTTP_VERSION_2_PRIOR_KNOWLEDGE.

Asking for http2 prior knowledge when the server does in fact not support HTTP/2 will give you an error back.

Diego Bes brought this feature.

TCP Fast Open

TCP Fast Open is documented in RFC 7413 and is basically a way to pass on data to the remote machine earlier in the TCP handshake - already in the SYN and SYN-ACK packets. This of course as a means to get data over faster and reduce latency.

The --tcp-fastopen option is supported on Linux and OS X only for now.

This is an idea and technique that has been around for a while and it is slowly getting implemented and supported by servers. There have been some reports of problems in the wild when "middle boxes" that fiddle with TCP traffic see these packets, that sometimes result in breakage. So this option is opt-in to avoid the risk that it causes problems to users.

A typical real-world case where you would use this option is when  sending an HTTP POST to a site you don't have a connection already established to. Just note that TFO relies on the client having had contact established with the server before and having a special TFO "cookie" stored and non-expired.

TCP Fast Open is so far only used for clear-text TCP protocols in curl. These days more and more protocols switch over to their TLS counterparts (and there's room for future improvements to add the initial TLS handshake parts with TFO). A related option to speed up TLS handshakes is --false-start (supported with the NSS or the secure transport backends).

With libcurl, you enable TCP Fast Open with CURLOPT_TCP_FASTOPEN.

Alessandro Ghedini brought this feature.

curl 7.40.0: unix domain sockets and smb

curl and libcurl curl dot-to-dot7.40.0 was just released this morning. There's a closer look at some of the perhaps more noteworthy changes. As usual, you can find the entire changelog on the curl web site.

HTTP over unix domain sockets

So just before the feature window closed for the pending 7.40.0 release of curl, Peter Wu's patch series was merged that brings the ability to curl and libcurl to do HTTP over unix domain sockets. This is a feature that's been mentioned many times through the history of curl but never previously truly implemented. Peter also very nicely adjusted the test server and made two test cases that verify the functionality.

To use this with the curl command line, you specify the socket path to the new --unix-domain option and assuming your local HTTP server listens on that socket, you'll get the response back just as with an ordinary TCP connection.

Doing the operation from libcurl means using the new CURLOPT_UNIX_SOCKET_PATH option.

This feature is actually not limited to HTTP, you can do all the TCP-based protocols except FTP over the unix domain socket, but it is to my knowledge only HTTP that is regularly used this way. The reason FTP isn't supported is of course its use of two connections which would be even weirder to do like this.

SMB

SMB is also known as CIFS and is an old network protocol from the Microsoft world access files. curl and libcurl now support this protocol with SMB:// URLs thanks to work by Bill Nagel and Steve Holme.

Security Advisories

Last year we had a large amount of security advisories published (eight to be precise), and this year we start out with two fresh ones already on the 8th day... The ones this time were of course discovered and researched already last year.

CVE-2014-8151 is a way we accidentally allowed an application to bypass the TLS server certificate check if a TLS Session-ID was already cached for a non-checked session - when using the Mac OS SecureTransport SSL backend.

CVE-2014-8150 is a URL request injection. When letting curl or libcurl speak over a HTTP proxy, it would copy the URL verbatim into the HTTP request going to the proxy, which means that if you craft the URL and insert CRLFs (carriage returns and linefeed characters) you can insert your own second request or even custom headers into the request that goes to the proxy.

You may enjoy taking a look at the curl vulnerabilities table.

Bugs bugs bugs

The release notes mention no less than 120 specific bug fixes, which in comparison to other releases is more than average.

Enjoy!

A bad move. A really bad move.

So I wrote this little perl script to perform a lot of repeated binary Rockbox builds. It builds something like 35 builds and zips them up and gives them proper names in a dedicated output directory. Perfect to do things such as release builds.

Then I wrote a similar one to build manuals and offer them too. I then made the results available on the Rockbox 3.0RC (release candidate) page of mine.

Cool, me thinks, and since I'll be away now for a week starting Wednesday I think I should make the scripts available in case someone else wants to play with them and possibly make a release while I'm gone.

I did

mv buildall.pl webdirectory/buildall.pl.txt

... thinking that I don't want it to try to execute as a perl script on the server so I rename it to a .txt extension. But did this work? No. Did it cause total havoc? Yes.

First, Apache apparently still thinks these files are perl scripts (== cgi scripts) on my server, even if they got an additional extension. I really really didn't expect this.

Then, my scripts are doing a command chain similar to "mkdir dir; cd dir; rm -rf *". It works great when invoked in the correct directory. It works less fine when the web server invokes this because someone clicked on the file I just made available to the world.

Recursive deletion of all files the web server user was allowed to erase.

Did I immediately suspect foul play and evil doings by outsiders? Yes. Did it take quite a while to restore the damages from backups? Yes. Did it feel painful to realize that I myself was to blame for this entire incident and not at all any outside or evil perpetrator? Yes yes yes.

But honestly, in the end I felt good that it wasn't a security hole somewhere that caused it since I hate spending all that time to track it down and fix it. And thanks to a very fine backup system, I had most of the site and things back up and running after roughly one hour off-line time.

Rockbox

curl feature freeze March 20 2008

It is yet again time to pause the add-new-features-craze in order to settle down and fix a few more remaining bugs before we go ship another curl and libcurl release in the beginning of April.

cURL

So at March 20 we hold back and only fix bugs for about 2 weeks until we release curl and libcurl 7.18.1.

The only currently mentioned flaw in TODO-RELEASE to fix before this release is the claimed race condition in win32 gethostbyname_thread but since the reporter doesn't respond anymore and we can't repeat the problem it is deemed to just be buried and forgotten.

Other problems currently mentioned on the mailing list is a POST problem with digest and read callbacks and a mysterious bad progress callbacks for uploads, but none of them seem very serious and thus terribly important to get fixed in case they should turn out hard-to-fix.

Yes, I picked the date on purpose as that is the magic date in this project. Especially this year.

The Agony of Release

In the Rockbox project we haven't had an official release in several years. We have >400K lines of code, some 60 committers. Some 300 patch contributors. At least 10,000 users, but probably up to 10-20 times that number.

We produce binary downloads after every single commit. We provide daily builds with a 30 day backlog. We provide a UI-based installer that can install the latest package for you.

So, we have a fair setup that provides releases in a fine way to everone interested. What we don't have is a stable offer. Nobody can get a recent "stable" release (with a set of known bugs) or similar. We only have this endless series of "beta"-releases. We don't have any particular push for doing a "real" release and among the developers there aren't that many who think making releases is any fun, so we're not really striving towards that.

The last time we tried to put together a release (to be called "3.0") we decided to have a feature freeze period in which we'd only commit bug fixes and not do any new features. This lead to that most people simply stopped committing and developed their new stuff on the side, waiting for the freeze to go over. Only a few people did any actual bugfixing while we had some pretty serious flaws still in the code, so even with extended freezes we just couldn't get the bug count down to a satisfiable level... we ended up just dumping the idea of a release 3.0 at that time, and it left some scars in the community that has so far prevented us from returning to this topic.

Rockbox

This said, today we're more than 18 months further down the road, Rockbox runs on many more platforms, lots of code has changed and been improved since the previous 3.0 effort. Maybe it is time to once again make a release-attempt?

I think there are a few preconditions we need for this to succeed, including:

  • We need a single release manager person who single-handedly can decide when the release is finished. This person would also have the final say on the outstanding-issues list etc. We can't manage to get consensus among this large amount of people for this black-and-white style of questions.
  • We need to accept that fact that some bugs just have to be in the release and we can live with them - after all most of these sorts of bugs have been with us for a very long time already and all of us have managed to live and use Rockbox fine for years in spite of their presence.
  • We need to accept and realize that most of "us" - the devs, the closest team of followers, will not use the release anyway as the day after the release we will provide a new set of spanking fresh binaries to download and use... We don't do the release for us. We do the release to the huge audience out there who look for "stable" and "known to work" stuff.
  • Less people need to worry and have strong opinions about exactly what goes into the release or not. If we just get one release out, there will follow more further on that will get the stuff that is left out in this!

I am officially not volunteering to be a release manager! 😉

Aiming for 7.18.0 in January 2008

cURLThis info was also posted to the curl-library list today.

I previously thought of releasing 7.18.0 in December but since there are still outstanding topics in the list and since there's no pressure due to any serious bug fixes or anything, I decided we can just as wait until January. I want January 13th to be the feature freeze day after which no new features will be committed until the release, which hopefully then could be done by January 28th or so.

The live updated TODO-RELEASE document will change over time, but it currently contains these items:

Is there anything we've forgotten we should include in the next release? To get a feel for how the next release will look like, check out the RELEASE-NOTES in progress, or try out a daily snapshot!