Tag Archives: bug bounty

Report from the curl bounty program

We announced our glorious return to the “bug bounty club” (projects that run bug bounties) a month ago, and with the curl 7.65.0 release today on May 22nd of 2019 we also ship fixes to security vulnerabilities that were reported within this bug bounty program.

Announcement

Even before we publicly announced the program, it was made public on the Hackerone site. That was obviously enough to get noticed by people and we got the first reports immediately!

We have received 19 reports so far.

Infrastructure scans

Quite clearly some people have some scripts laying around and they do some pretty standard things on projects that pop up on hackerone. We immediately got a number of reports that reported variations of the same two things repeatedly:

  1. Our wiki is world editable. In my world I’ve lived under the assumption that this is how a wiki is meant to be but we ended up having to specifically mention this on curl’s hackerone page: yes it is open for everyone on purpose.
  2. Sending emails forging them to look like the come from the curl web site might work since our DNS doesn’t have SPF, DKIM etc setup. This is a somewhat better report, but our bounty program is dedicated for and focused on the actual curl and libcurl products. Not our infrastructure.

Bounties!

Within two days of the program’s life time, the first legit report had been filed and then within a few more days a second arrived. They are CVE-2019-5435 and CVE-2019-5436, explained somewhat in my curl 7.65.0 release post but best described in their individual advisories, linked to below.

I’m thrilled to report that these two reporters were awarded money for their findings:

Wenchao Li was awarded 150 USD for finding and reporting CVE-2019-5435.

l00p3r was awarded 200 USD for finding and reporting CVE-2019-5436.

Both these issues were rated severity level “Low” and we consider them rather obscure and not likely to hurt very many users.

Donate to help us fund this!

Please notice that we are entirely depending on donated funds to be able to run this program. If you use curl and benefit from a more secure curl, please consider donating a little something for the cause!

curl + hackerone = TRUE

There seems to be no end to updated posts about bug bounties in the curl project these days. Not long ago I mentioned the then new program that sadly enough was cancelled only a few months after its birth.

Now we are back with a new and refreshed bug bounty program! The curl bug bounty program reborn.

This new program, which hopefully will manage to survive a while, is setup in cooperation with the major bug bounty player out there: hackerone.

Basic rules

If you find or suspect a security related issue in curl or libcurl, report it! (and don’t speak about it in public at all until an agreed future date.)

You’re entitled to ask for a bounty for all and every valid and confirmed security problem that wasn’t already reported and that exists in the latest public release.

The curl security team will then assess the report and the problem and will then reward money depending on bug severity and other details.

Where does the money come from?

We intend to use funds and money from wherever we can. The Hackerone Internet Bug Bounty program helps us, donations collected over at opencollective will be used as well as dedicated company sponsorships.

We will of course also greatly appreciate any direct sponsorships from companies for this program. You can help curl getting even better by adding funds to the bounty program and help us reward hard-working researchers.

Why bounties at all?

We compete for the security researchers’ time and attention with other projects, both open and proprietary. The projects that can help put food on these researchers’ tables might have a better chance of getting them to use their tools, time, skills and fingers to find our problems instead of someone else’s.

Finding and disclosing security problems can be very time and resource consuming. We want to make it less likely that people give up their attempts before they find anything. We can help full and part time security engineers sustain their livelihood by paying for the fruits of their labor. At least a little bit.

Only released code?

The state of the code repository in git is not subject for bounties. We need to allow developers to do mistakes and to experiment a little in the git repository, while we expect and want every actual public release to be free from security vulnerabilities.

So yes, the obvious downside with this is that someone could spot an issue in git and decide not to report it since it doesn’t give any money and hope that the flaw will linger around and ship in the release – and then reported it and claim reward money. I think we just have to trust that this will not be a standard practice and if we in fact notice that someone tries to exploit the bounty in this manner, we can consider counter-measures then.

How about money for the patches?

There’s of course always a discussion as to why we should pay anyone for bugs and then why just pay for reported security problems and not for heroes who authored the code in the first place and neither for the good people who write the patches to fix the reported issues. Those are valid questions and we would of course rather pay every contributor a lot of money, but we don’t have the funds for that. And getting funding for this kind of dedicated bug bounties seem to be doable, where as a generic pay contributors fund is trickier both to attract money but it is also really hard to distribute in an open project of curl’s nature.

How much money?

At the start of this program the award amounts are as following. We reward up to this amount of money for vulnerabilities of the following security levels:

Critical: 2,000 USD
High: 1,500 USD
Medium: 1,000 USD
Low: 500 USD

Depending on how things go, how fast we drain the fund and how much companies help us refill, the amounts may change over time.

Found a security flaw?

Report it!

More curl bug bounty

Together with Bountygraph, the curl project now offers money to security researchers for report security vulnerabilities to us.

https://bountygraph.com/programs/curl

The idea is that sponsors donate money to the bounty fund, and we will use that fund to hand out rewards for reported issues. It is a way for the curl project to help compensate researchers for the time and effort they spend helping us improving our security.

Right now the bounty fund is very small as we just started this project, but hopefully we can get a few sponsors interested and soon offer “proper” rewards at decent levels in case serious flaws are detected and reported here.

If you’re a company using curl or libcurl and value security, you know what you can do…

Already before, people who reported security problems could ask for money from Hackerone’s IBB program, and this new program is in addition to that – even though you won’t be able to receive money from both bounties for the same issue.

After I announced this program on twitter yesterday, I did an interview with Arif Khan for latesthackingnews.com. Here’s what I had to say:

A few questions

Q: You have launched a self-managed bug bounty program for the first time. Earlier, IBB used to pay out for most security issues in libcurl. How do you think the idea of self-management of a bug bounty program, which has some obvious problems such as active funding might eventually succeed?

First, this bounty program is run on bountygraph.com so I wouldn’t call it “self-managed” since we’re standing on a lot of infra setup and handled by others.

To me, this is an attempt to make a bounty program that is more visible as clearly a curl bounty program. I love Hackerone and the IBB program for what they offer, but it is A) very generic, so the fact that you can get money for curl flaws there is not easy to figure out and there’s no obvious way for companies to sponsor curl security research and B) they are very picky to which flaws they pay money for (“only critical flaws”) and I hope this program can be a little more accommodating – assuming we get sponsors of course.

Will it work and make any differences compared to IBB? I don’t know. We will just have to see how it plays out.

Q: How do you think the crowdsourcing model is going to help this bug bounty program?

It’s crucial. If nobody sponsors this program, there will be no money to do payouts with and without payouts there are no bounties. Then I’d call the curl bounty program a failure. But we’re also not in a hurry. We can give this some time to see how it works out.

My hope is though that because curl is such a widely used component, we will get sponsors interested in helping out.

Q: What would be the maximum reward for most critical a.k.a. P0 security vulnerabilities for this program?

Right now we have a total of 500 USD to hand out. If you report a p0 bug now, I suppose you’ll get that. If we just get sponsors, I’m hoping we should be able to raise that reward level significantly. I might be very naive, but I think we won’t have to pay for very many critical flaws.

It goes back to the previous question: this model will only work if we get sponsors.

Q: Do you feel there’s a risk that bounty hunters could turn malicious?

I don’t think this bounty program particularly increases or reduces that risk to any significant degree. Malicious hunters probably already exist and I would assume that blackhat researchers might be able to extract more money on the less righteous markets if they’re so inclined. I don’t think we can “outbid” such buyers with this program.

Q: How will this new program mutually benefit security researchers as well as the open source community around curl as a whole?

Again, assuming that this works out…

Researchers can get compensated for the time and efforts they spend helping the curl project to produce and provide a more secure product to the world.

curl is used by virtually every connected device in the world in one way or another, affecting every human in the connected world on a daily basis. By making sure curl is secure we keep users safe; users of countless devices, applications and networked infrastructure.

Update: just hours after this blog post, Dropbox chipped in 32,768 USD to the curl bounty fund…