Tag Archives: DNS-over-HTTPS

My 10th FOSDEM

I didn’t present anything during last year’s conference, so I submitted my DNS-over-HTTPS presentation proposal early on for this year’s FOSDEM. Someone suggested it was generic enough I should rather ask for main track instead of the DNS room, and so I did. Then time passed and in November 2018 “HTTP/3” was officially coined as a real term and then, after the Mozilla devroom’s deadline had been extended for a week I filed my second proposal. I might possibly even have been an hour or two after the deadline. I hoped at least one of them would be accepted.

Not only were both my proposed talks accepted, I was also approached and couldn’t decline the honor of participating in the DNS privacy panel. Ok, three slots in the same FOSDEM is a new record for me, but hey, surely that’s no problems for a grown-up..

HTTP/3

I of coursed hoped there would be interest in what I had to say.

I spent the time immediately before my talk with a coffee in the awesome newly opened cafeteria part to have a moment of calmness before I started. I then headed over to the U2.208 room maybe half an hour before the start time.

It was packed. Quite literally there were hundreds of persons waiting in the area outside the U2 rooms and there was this totally massive line of waiting visitors queuing to get into the Mozilla room once it would open.

The “Sorry, this room is FULL” sign is commonly seen on FOSDEM.

People don’t know who I am by my appearance so I certainly didn’t get any special treatment, waiting for my talk to start. I waited in line with the rest and when the time for my presentation started to get closer I just had to excuse myself, leave my friends behind and push through the crowd. I managed to get a “sorry, it’s full” told to me by a conference admin before one of the room organizers recognized me as the speaker of the next talk and I could walk by a very long line of humans that eventually would end up not being able to get in. The room could fit 170 souls, and every single seat was occupied when I started my presentation just a few minutes late.

This presentation could have filled a much larger room. Two years ago my HTTP/2 talk filled up the 300 seat room Mozilla had that year.

Video

Video from my HTTP/3 talk. Duration 1 hour.

The slides from my HTTP/3 presentation.

DNS over HTTPS

I tend to need a little “landing time” after having done a presentation to cool off an come back to normal senses and adrenaline levels again. I got myself a lunch, a beer and chatted with friends in the cafeteria (again). During this conversation, it struck me I had forgotten something in my coming presentation and I added a slide that I felt would improve it (the screenshot showing “about:networking#dns” output with DoH enabled). In what felt like no time, it was again to move. I walked over to Janson, the giant hall that fits 1,470 persons, which I entered a few minutes ahead of my scheduled time and began setting up my machine.

I started off with a little technical glitch because the projector was correctly detected and setup as a second screen on my laptop but it would detect and use a too high resolution for it, but after just a short moment of panic I lowered the resolution on that screen manually and the image appeared fine. Phew! With a slightly raised pulse, I witnessed the room fill up. Almost full. I estimate over 90% of the seats were occupied.

The DNS over HTTPS talk seen from far back. Photo by Steve Holme.

This was a brand new talk with all new material and I performed it for the largest audience I think I’ve ever talked in front of.

Video

Video of my DNS over HTTPS presentation. Duration 50 minutes.

To no surprise, my talk triggered questions and objections. I spent a while in the corridor behind Janson afterward, discussing DoH details, the future of secure DNS and other subtle points of the different protocols involved. In the end I think I manged pretty good, and I had expected more arguments and more tough questions. This is after all the single topic I’ve had more abuse and name-calling for than anything else I’ve ever worked on before in my 20+ years in Internet protocols. (After all, I now often refer to myself and what I do as webshit.)

My DNS over HTTPS slides.

DNS Privacy panel

I never really intended to involve myself in DNS privacy discussions, but due to the constant misunderstandings and mischaracterizations (both on purpose and by ignorance) sometimes spread about DoH, I’ve felt a need to stand up for it a few times. I think that was a contributing factor to me getting invited to be part of the DNS privacy panel that the organizers of the DNS devroom setup.

There are several problems and challenges left to solve before we’re in a world with correctly and mostly secure DNS. DoH is one attempt to raise the bar. I was content to had the opportunity to really spell out my view of things before the DNS privacy panel.

While sitting next to these giants from the DNS world, Stéphane Bortzmeyer, Bert Hubert and me discussed DoT, DoH, DNS centralization, user choice, quad-dns-hosters and more. The discussion didn’t get very heated but instead I think it showed that we’re all largely in agreement that we need more secure DNS and that there are obstacles in the way forward that we need to work further on to overcome. Moderator Jan-Piet Mens did an excellent job I think, handing over the word, juggling the questions and taking in questions from the audience.

Video

Video from the DNS Privacy panel. Duration 30 minutes.

Ten years, ten slots

Appearing in three scheduled slots during the same FOSDEM was a bit much, and it effectively made me not attend many other talks. They were all great fun to do though, and I appreciate people giving me the chance to share my knowledge and views to the world. As usually very nicely organized and handled. The videos of each presentation are linked to above.

I met many people, old and new friends. I handed out a lot of curl stickers and I enjoyed talking to people about my recently announced new job at wolfSSL.

After ten consecutive annual visits to FOSDEM, I have appeared in ten program slots!

I fully intend to go back to FOSDEM again next year. For all the friends, the waffles, the chats, the beers, the presentations and then for the waffles again. Maybe I will even present something…

My talks at FOSDEM 2019

I’ll be celebrating my 10th FOSDEM when I travel down to Brussels again in early February 2019. That’s ten years in a row. It’ll also be the 6th year I present something there, as I’ve done these seven talks in the past:

My past FOSDEM appearances

2010. I talked Rockbox in the embedded room.

2011. libcurl, seven SSL libs and one SSH lib in the security room.

2015. Internet all the things – using curl in your device. In the embedded room.

2015. HTTP/2 right now. In the Mozilla room.

2016. an HTTP/2 update. In the Mozilla room.

2017. curl. On the main track.

2017. So that was HTTP/2, what’s next? In the Mozilla room.

DNS over HTTPS – the good, the bad and the ugly

On the main track, in Janson at 15:00 on Saturday 2nd of February.

DNS over HTTPS (aka “DoH”, RFC 8484) introduces a new transport protocol to do secure and private DNS messaging. Why was it made, how does it work and how users are free (to resolve names).

The presentation will discuss reasons why DoH was deemed necessary and interesting to ship and deploy and how it compares to alternative technologies that offer similar properties. It will discuss how this protocol “liberates” users and offers stronger privacy (than the typical status quo).

How to enable and start using DoH today.

It will also discuss some downsides with DoH and what you should consider before you decide to use a random DoH server on the Internet.

HTTP/3

In the Mozilla room, at 11:30 on Saturday 2nd of February.

HTTP/3 is the next coming HTTP version.

This time TCP is replaced by the new transport protocol QUIC and things are different yet again! This is a presentation about HTTP/3 and QUIC with a following Q&A about everything HTTP. Join us at Goto 10.

HTTP/3 is the designated name for the coming next version of the protocol that is currently under development within the QUIC working group in the IETF.

HTTP/3 is designed to improve in areas where HTTP/2 still has some shortcomings, primarily by changing the transport layer. HTTP/3 is the first major protocol to step away from TCP and instead it uses QUIC. I’ll talk about HTTP/3 and QUIC. Why the new protocols are deemed necessary, how they work, how they change how things are sent over the network and what some of the coming deployment challenges will be.

DNS Privacy panel

In the DNS room, at 11:55 on Sunday 3rd of February.

This isn’t strictly a prepared talk or presentation but I’ll still be there and participate in the panel discussion on DNS privacy. I hope to get most of my finer points expressed in the DoH talk mentioned above, but I’m fully prepared to elaborate on some of them in this session.

DNS-over-HTTPS is RFC 8484

The protocol we fondly know as DoH, DNS-over-HTTPS, is now  officially RFC 8484 with the official title “DNS Queries over HTTPS (DoH)”. It documents the protocol that is already in production and used by several client-side implementations, including Firefox, Chrome and curl. Put simply, DoH sends a regular RFC 1035 DNS packet over HTTPS instead of over plain UDP.

I’m happy to have contributed my little bits to this standard effort and I’m credited in the Acknowledgements section. I’ve also implemented DoH client-side several times now.

Firefox has done studies and tests in cooperation with a CDN provider (which has sometimes made people conflate Firefox’s DoH support with those studies and that operator). These studies have shown and proven that DoH is a working way for many users to do secure name resolves at a reasonable penalty cost. At least when using a fallback to the native resolver for the tricky situations. In general DoH resolves are slower than the native ones but in the tail end, the absolutely slowest name resolves got a lot better with the DoH option.

To me, DoH is partly necessary because the “DNS world” has failed to ship and deploy secure and safe name lookups to the masses and this is the one way applications “one layer up” can still secure our users.

DoH in curl

DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH) is being designed (it is not an RFC quite yet but very soon!) to allow internet clients to get increased privacy and security for their name resolves. I’ve previously explained the DNS-over-HTTPS functionality within Firefox that ships in Firefox 62 and I did a presentation about DoH and its future in curl at curl up 2018.

We are now introducing DoH support in curl. I hope this will not only allow users to start getting better privacy and security for their curl based internet transfers, but ideally this will also provide an additional debugging tool for DoH in other clients and servers.

Let’s take a look at how we plan to let applications enable this when using libcurl and how libcurl has to work with this internally to glue things together.

How do I make my libcurl transfer use DoH?

There’s a primary new option added, which is the “DoH URL”. An application sets the CURLOPT_DOH_URL for a transfer, and then libcurl will use that service for resolving host names. Easy peasy. There should be nothing else in the transfer that changes or appears differently. It’ll just resolve the host names over DoH instead of using the default resolver!

What about bootstrap, how does libcurl find the DoH server’s host name?

Since the DoH URL itself typically is given using a host name, that first host name will be resolved using the normal resolver – or if you so desire, you can provide the IP address for that host name with the CURLOPT_RESOLVE option just like you can for any host name.

If done using the resolver, the resolved address will then be kept in libcurl’s DNS cache for a short while and the DoH connection will be kept in the regular connection pool with the other connections, making subsequent DoH resolves on the same handle much faster.

How do I use this from the command line?

Tell curl which DoH URL to use with the new –doh-url command line option:

$ curl --doh-url https://dns-server.example.com https://www.example.com

How do I make my libcurl code use this?

curl = curl_easy_init();
curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_URL,
                 "https://curl.haxx.se/");
curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_DOH_URL,
                 "https://doh.example.com/");
res = curl_easy_perform(curl);

Internals

Internally, libcurl itself creates two new easy handles that it adds to the existing multi handles and they are then performing two HTTP requests while the original transfer sits in the “waiting for name resolve” state. Once the DoH requests are completed, the original transfer’s state can progress and continue on.

libcurl handles parallel transfers perfectly well already and by leveraging the already existing support for this, it was easy to add this new functionality and still work non-blocking and even event-based correctly depending on what libcurl API that is being used.

We had to add a new little special thing that makes libcurl handle the end of a transfer in a new way since there are now easy handles that are created and added to the multi handle entirely without the user’s knowledge, so the code also needs to remove and delete those handles when they’re done serving their purposes.

Was this hard to add to a 20 year old code base?

Actually, no. It was surprisingly easy, but then I’ve also worked on a few different client-side DoH implementations already so I had gotten myself a clear view of how I wanted the functionality to work plus the fact that I’m very familiar with the libcurl internals.

Plus, everything inside libcurl is already using non-blocking code and the multi interface paradigms so the foundation for adding parallel transfers like this was already in place.

The entire DoH patch for curl, including documentation and test cases, was a mere 1500 lines.

Ship?

This is merged into the master branch in git and is planned to ship as part of the next release: 7.62.0 at the end of October 2018.

How to DoH-only with Firefox

Firefox supports DNS-over-HTTPS (aka DoH) since version 62.

You can instruct your Firefox to only use DoH and never fall-back and try the native resolver; the mode we call trr-only. Without any other ability to resolve host names, this is a little tricky so this guide is here to help you. (This situation might improve in the future.)

In trr-only mode, nobody on your local network nor on your ISP can snoop on your name resolves. The SNI part of HTTPS connections are still clear text though, so eavesdroppers on path can still figure out which hosts you connect to.

There’s a name in my URI

A primary problem for trr-only is that we usually want to use a host name in the URI for the DoH server (we typically need it to be a name so that we can verify the server’s certificate against it), but we can’t resolve that host name until DoH is setup to work. A catch-22.

There are currently two ways around this problem:

  1. Tell Firefox the IP address of the name that you use in the URI. We call it the “bootstrapAddress”. See further below.
  2. Use a DoH server that is provided on an IP-number URI. This is rather unusual. There’s for example one at 1.1.1.1.

Setup and use trr-only

There are three prefs to focus on (they’re all explained elsewhere):

network.trr.mode – set this to the number 3.

network.trr.uri – set this to the URI of the DoH server you want to use. This should be a server you trust and want to hand over your name resolves to. The Cloudflare one we’ve previously used in DoH tests with Firefox is https://mozilla.cloudflare-dns.com/dns-query.

network.trr.bootstrapAddress– when you use a host name in the URI for the network.trr.uri pref you must set this pref to an IP address that host name resolves to for you. It is important that you pick an IP address that the name you use actually would resolve to.

Example

Let’s pretend you want to go full trr-only and use a DoH server at https://example.com/dns. (it’s a pretend URI, it doesn’t work).

Figure out the bootstrapAddress with dig. Resolve the host name from the URI:

$ dig +short example.com
93.184.216.34

or if you prefer to be classy and use the IPv6 address (only do this if IPv6 is actually working for you)

$ dig -t AAAA +short example.com
2606:2800:220:1:248:1893:25c8:1946

dig might give you a whole list of addresses back, and then you can pick any one of them in the list. Only pick one address though.

Go to “about:config” and paste the copied IP address into the value field for network.trr.bootstrapAddress. Now TRR / DoH should be able to get going. When you can see web pages, you know it works!

DoH-only means only DoH

If you happen to start Firefox behind a captive portal while in trr-only mode, the connections to the DoH server will fail and no name resolves can be performed.

In those situations, normally Firefox’s captive portable detector would trigger and show you the login page etc, but when no names can be resolved and the captive portal can’t respond with a fake response to the name lookup and redirect you to the login, it won’t get anywhere. It gets stuck. And currently, there’s no good visual indication anywhere that this is what happens.

You simply can’t get out of a captive portal with trr-only. You probably then temporarily switch mode, login to the portal and switch the mode to 3 again.

If you “unlock” the captive portal with another browser/system, Firefox’s regular retries while in trr-only will soon detect that and things should start working again.

Inside Firefox’s DOH engine

DNS over HTTPS (DOH) is a feature where a client shortcuts the standard native resolver and instead asks a dedicated DOH server to resolve names.

Compared to regular unprotected DNS lookups done over UDP or TCP, DOH increases privacy, security and sometimes even performance. It also makes it easy to use a name server of your choice for a particular application instead of the one configured globally (often by someone else) for your entire system.

DNS over HTTPS is quite simply the same regular DNS packets (RFC 1035 style) normally sent in clear-text over UDP or TCP but instead sent with HTTPS requests. Your typical DNS server provider (like your ISP) might not support this yet.

To get the finer details of this concept, check out Lin Clark’s awesome cartoon explanation of DNS and DOH.

This new Firefox feature is planned to get ready and ship in Firefox release 62 (early September 2018). You can test it already now in Firefox Nightly by setting preferences manually as described below.

This article will explain some of the tweaks, inner details and the finer workings of the Firefox TRR implementation (TRR == Trusted Recursive Resolver) that speaks DOH.

Preferences

All preferences (go to “about:config”) for this functionality are located under the “network.trr” prefix.

network.trr.mode – set which resolver mode you want.

0 – Off (default). use standard native resolving only (don’t use TRR at all)
1 – Race native against TRR. Do them both in parallel and go with the one that returns a result first.
2 – TRR first. Use TRR first, and only if the name resolve fails use the native resolver as a fallback.
3 – TRR only. Only use TRR. Never use the native (after the initial setup).
4 – Shadow mode. Runs the TRR resolves in parallel with the native for timing and measurements but uses only the native resolver results.
5 – Explicitly off. Also off, but selected off by choice and not default.

network.trr.uri – (default: none) set the URI for your DOH server. That’s the URL Firefox will issue its HTTP request to. It must be a HTTPS URL (non-HTTPS URIs will simply be ignored). If “useGET” is enabled, Firefox will append “?ct&dns=….” to the URI when it makes its HTTP requests. For the default POST requests, they will be issued to exactly the specified URI.

“mode” and “uri” are the only two prefs required to set to activate TRR. The rest of them listed below are for tweaking behavior.

We list some publicly known DOH servers here. If you prefer to, it is easy to setup and run your own.

network.trr.credentials – (default: none) set credentials that will be used in the HTTP requests to the DOH end-point. It is the right side content, the value, sent in the Authorization: request header. Handy if you for example want to run your own public server and yet limit who can use it.

network.trr.wait-for-portal – (default: true) this boolean tells Firefox to first wait for the captive portal detection to signal “okay” before TRR is used.

network.trr.allow-rfc1918 – (default: false) set this to true to allow RFC 1918 private addresses in TRR responses. When set false, any such response will be considered a wrong response that won’t be used.

network.trr.useGET – (default: false) When the browser issues a request to the DOH server to resolve host names, it can do that using POST or GET. By default Firefox will use POST, but by toggling this you can enforce GET to be used instead. The DOH spec says a server MUST support both methods.

network.trr.confirmationNS – (default: example.com) At startup, Firefox will first check an NS entry to verify that TRR works, before it gets enabled for real and used for name resolves. This preference sets which domain to check. The verification only checks for a positive answer, it doesn’t actually care what the response data says.

network.trr.bootstrapAddress – (default: none) by setting this field to the IP address of the host name used in “network.trr.uri”, you can bypass using the system native resolver for it. This avoids that initial (native) name resolve for the host name mentioned in the network.trr.uri pref.

network.trr.blacklist-duration – (default: 60) is the number of seconds a name will be kept in the TRR blacklist until it expires and can be tried again. The default duration is one minute. (Update: this has been cut down from previous longer defaults.)

network.trr.request-timeout – (default: 3000) is the number of milliseconds a request to and corresponding response from the DOH server is allowed to spend until considered failed and discarded.

network.trr.early-AAAA – (default: false) For each normal name resolve, Firefox issues one HTTP request for A entries and another for AAAA entries. The responses come back separately and can come in any order. If the A records arrive first, Firefox will – as an optimization – continue and use those addresses without waiting for the second response. If the AAAA records arrive first, Firefox will only continue and use them immediately if this option is set to true.

network.trr.max-fails – (default: 5) If this many DoH requests in a row fails, consider TRR broken and go back to verify-NS state. This is meant to detect situations when the DoH server dies.

network.trr.disable-ECS – (default: true) If set, TRR asks the resolver to disable ECS (EDNS Client Subnet – the method where the resolver passes on the subnet of the client asking the question). Some resolvers will use ECS to the upstream if this request is not passed on to them.

Split-horizon and blacklist

With regular DNS, it is common to have clients in different places get different results back. This can be done since the servers know from where the request comes (which also enables quite a degree of spying) and they can then respond accordingly. When switching to another resolver with TRR, you may experience that you don’t always get the same set of addresses back. At times, this causes problems.

As a precaution, Firefox features a system that detects if a name can’t be resolved at all with TRR and can then fall back and try again with just the native resolver (the so called TRR-first mode). Ending up in this scenario is of course slower and leaks the name over clear-text UDP but this safety mechanism exists to avoid users risking ending up in a black hole where certain sites can’t be accessed. Names that causes such TRR failures are then put in an internal dynamic blacklist so that subsequent uses of that name automatically avoids using DNS-over-HTTPS for a while (see the blacklist-duration pref to control that period). Of course this fall-back is not in use if TRR-only mode is selected.

In addition, if a host’s address is retrieved via TRR and Firefox subsequently fails to connect to that host, it will redo the resolve without DOH and retry the connect again just to make sure that it wasn’t a split-horizon situation that caused the problem.

When a host name is added to the TRR blacklist, its domain also gets checked in the background to see if that whole domain perhaps should be blacklisted to ensure a smoother ride going forward.

Additionally, “localhost” and all names in the “.local” TLD are sort of hard-coded as blacklisted and will never be resolved with TRR. (Unless you run TRR-only…)

TTL as a bonus!

With the implementation of DNS-over-HTTPS, Firefox now gets the TTL (Time To Live, how long a record is valid) value for each DNS address record and can store and use that for expiry time in its internal DNS cache. Having accurate lifetimes improves the cache as it then knows exactly how long the name is meant to work and means less guessing and heuristics.

When using the native name resolver functions, this time-to-live data is normally not provided and Firefox does in fact not use the TTL on other platforms than Windows and on Windows it has to perform some rather awkward quirks to get the TTL from DNS for each record.

Server push

Still left to see how useful this will become in real-life, but DOH servers can push new or updated DNS records to Firefox. HTTP/2 Server Push being responses to requests the client didn’t send but the server thinks the client might appreciate anyway as if it sent requests for those resources.

These pushed DNS records will be treated as regular name resolve responses and feed the Firefox in-memory DNS cache, making subsequent resolves of those names to happen instantly.

Bootstrap

You specify the DOH service as a full URI with a name that needs to be resolved, and in a cold start Firefox won’t know the IP address of that name and thus needs to resolve it first (or use the provided address you can set with network.trr.bootstrapAddress). Firefox will then use the native resolver for that, until TRR has proven itself to work by resolving the network.trr.confirmationNS test domain. Firefox will also by default wait for the captive portal check to signal “OK” before it uses TRR, unless you tell it otherwise.

As a result of this bootstrap procedure, and if you’re not in TRR-only mode, you might still get  a few native name resolves done at initial Firefox startups. Just telling you this so you don’t panic if you see a few show up.

CNAME

The code is aware of CNAME records and will “chase” them down and use the final A/AAAA entry with its TTL as if there were no CNAMEs present and store that in the in-memory DNS cache. This initial approach, at least, does not cache the intermediate CNAMEs nor does it care about the CNAME TTL values.

Firefox currently allows no more than 64(!) levels of CNAME redirections.

about:networking

Enter that address in the Firefox URL bar to reach the debug screen with a bunch of networking information. If you then click the DNS entry in the left menu, you’ll get to see the contents of Firefox’s in-memory DNS cache. The TRR column says true or false for each name if that was resolved using TRR or not. If it wasn’t, the native resolver was used instead for that name.

Private Browsing

When in private browsing mode, DOH behaves similar to regular name resolves: it keeps DNS cache entries separately from the regular ones and the TRR blacklist is then only kept in memory and not persisted to disk. The DNS cache is flushed when the last PB session is exited.

Tools

I wrote up dns2doh, a little tool to create DOH requests and responses with, that can be used to build your own toy server with and to generate requests to send with curl or similar.

It allows you to manually issue a type A (regular IPv4 address) DOH request like this:

$ dns2doh --A --onlyq --raw daniel.haxx.se | \
curl --data-binary @- \
https://dns.cloudflare.com/.well-known/dns \
-H "Content-Type: application/dns-udpwireformat"

I also wrote doh, which is a small stand-alone tool (based on libcurl) that issues requests for the A and AAAA records of a given host name from the given DOH URI.

Why HTTPS

Some people giggle and think of this as a massive layer violation. Maybe it is, but doing DNS over HTTPS makes a lot of sense compared to for example using plain TLS:

  1. We get transparent and proxy support “for free”
  2. We get multiplexing and the use of persistent connections from the get go (this can be supported by DNS-over-TLS too, depending on the implementation)
  3. Server push is a potential real performance booster
  4. Browsers often already have a lot of existing HTTPS connections to the same CDNs that might offer DOH.

Further explained in Patrick Mcmanus’ The Benefits of HTTPS for DNS.

It still leaks the SNI!

Yes, the Server Name Indication field in the TLS handshake is still clear-text, but we hope to address that as well in the future with efforts like encrypted SNI.

Bugs?

File bug reports in Bugzilla! (in “Core->Networking:DNS” please)

If you want to enable HTTP logging and see what TRR is doing, set the environment variable MOZ_LOG component and level to “nsHostResolver:5”. The TRR implementation source code in Firefox lives in netwerk/dns.

Caveats

Credits

While I have written most of the Firefox TRR implementation, I’ve been greatly assisted by Patrick Mcmanus. Valentin Gosu, Nick Hurley and others in the Firefox Necko team.

DOH in curl?

Since I am also the lead developer of curl people have asked. The work on DOH for curl has not really started yet, but I’ve collected some thoughts on how DNS-over-HTTPS could be implemented in curl and the doh tool I mentioned above has the basic function blocks already written.

Other efforts to enhance DNS security

There have been other DNS-over-HTTPS protocols and efforts. Recently there was one offered by at least Google that was a JSON style API. That’s different.

There’s also DNS-over-TLS which shares some of the DOH characteristics, but lacks for example the nice ability to work through proxies, do multiplexing and share existing connections with standard web traffic.

DNScrypt is an older effort that encrypts regular DNS packets and sends them over UDP or TCP.