Tag Archives: TV

Mr Robot curls

The Mr Robot TV series features a security expert and hacker lead character, Elliot.

Season 4, episode 8

Vasilis Lourdas reported that he did a “curl sighting” in the show and very well I took a closer peek and what do we see some 37 minutes 36 seconds into episode 8 season 4…

(I haven’t followed the show since at some point in season two so I cannot speak for what actually has happened in the plot up to this point. I’m only looking at and talking about what’s on the screenshots here.)

Elliot writes Python. In this Python program, we can see two curl invokes, both unfortunately a blurry on the right side so it’s hard to see them exactly (the blur is really there in the source and I couldn’t see/catch a single frame without it). Fortunately, I think we get some additional clues later on in episode 10, see below.

He invokes curl with -i to see the response header coming back but then he makes some questionable choices. The -k option is the short version of --insecure. It truly makes a HTTPS connection insecure since it completely switches off the CA cert verification. We all know no serious hacker would do that in a real world use.

Perhaps the biggest problem for me is however the following -X POST. In itself it doesn’t have to be bad, but when taking the second shot from episode 10 into account we see that he really does combine this with the use of -d and thus the -X is totally superfluous or perhaps even wrong. The show technician who wrote this copied a bad example…

The -b that follows is fun. That sets a specific cookie to be sent in the outgoing HTTP request. The random look of this cookie makes it smell like a session cookie of some sorts, which of course you’d rarely then hard-code it like this in a script and expect it to be of use at a later point. (Details unfold later.)

Season 4, episode 10

Lucas Pardue followed-up with this second sighting of curl from episode 10, at about 23:24. It appears that this might be the python program from episode 8 that is now made to run on or at least with a mobile phone. I would guess this is a session logged in somewhere else.

In this shot we can see the command line again from episode 8.

We learn something more here. The -b option didn’t specify a cookie – because there’s no = anywhere in the argument following. It actually specified a file name. Not sure that makes anything more sensible, because it seems weird to purposely use such a long and random-looking filename to store cookies in…

Here we also see that in this POST request it passes on a bank account number, a “coin address” and amountOfCoins=3684210526.31579 to this URL: https://buy-crypto-coin.net/purchase, and it gets 200 OK back from a HTTP/1.1 server.

I tried it

curl -i -k -X POST -d bankAccountNumber=8647389203882 -d coinAddress=1MbwAEKJCtPYpLPxEkUmZxwjk63nQrpbXo -d amountOfCoins=3684210526.31579 https://buy-crypto-coin.net/purchase

I don’t have the cookie file so it can’t be repeated completely. What did I learn?

First: OpenSSL 1.1.1 doesn’t even want to establish a TLS connection against this host and says dh key too small. So in order to continue this game I took to a curl built with a TLS library that didn’t complain on this silly server.

Next: I learned that the server responding on this address (because there truly is a HTTPS server there) doesn’t have this host name in its certificate so -k is truly required to make curl speak to this host!

Then finally it didn’t actually do anything fun that I could notice. How boring. It just responded with a 301 and Location: http://www.buy-crypto-coin.net. Notice how it redirects away from HTTPS.

What’s on that site? A rather good-looking fake cryptocurrency market site. The links at the bottom all go to various NBC Universal and USA Network URLs, which I presume are the companies behind the TV series. I saved a screenshot below just in case it changes.

Linux kernel code on TV

In one of the fast-moving early scenes in episode 16 of Person of Interest at roughly 2:05 into the thing I caught this snapshot:

person of interest s01e16

(click the image to see a slightly bigger version)

It is only in sight for a fraction of a second. What is seen in the very narrow terminal screen on the right is source code scrolling by. Which source code you say? Take a look again. That my friends is kernel/groups.c from around line 30 in a recent Linux kernel. I bet that source file never had so many viewers before, although perhaps not that many actually appreciated this insight! 😉

And before anyone asks: no, there’s absolutely no point or relevance in showing this source code in this section. It is just a way for the guys to look techy. And to be fair, in my mind kernel code is fairly techy!

I like a good firmware bump

So I have this TV that I got for Xmas 2009. As it happens the guys at Philips clearly kept fixing the software and removed bugs after that moment. No surprise there really. I’ve been an embedded software developer for some twenty years by now. I know that software never gets “done” and that what ships in products is only what seems to be “good enough” at some point in time. Sometimes of course not even that good.

So the other day I took a photo of my TV firmware version. It shows how the firmware was made in April 2009. I did it during a discussion with a friend who happens to have the exact same TV as I do, and it then of course turns out he has a different (newer) firmware.

Oh right, I wonder if I can upgrade to a newer one? Once I’ve mastered the maze of the Philips web site I eventually found a download link and PDFs that told me how to. The list of fixes since my version was extensive and I noticed a few flaws mentioned that I have actually experienced!

The TV firmware download was a whopping 43MB. I realize this is because it is a full-fledged Linux system with kernel and God knows what else they’ve crammed in there. I decided to give it a closer check! The result of that was a little disappointing. It is quite clearly encrypted after some basic initial header.

hexdump -C firmware image

The data that starts on offset 0x220 is not x86 instructions and in fact nothing in the beginning of the file looks like x86 code (I just ran a quick “objdump -D –target binary -m i386” on the file). Of course, I don’t know what architecture my TV runs so perhaps even checking for x86 is wrong. I know MIPS is popular in DVDs, settop-boxes and related graphics stuff but…. Nah, I decided it really wasn’t worth the effort so I stopped investigating. I have no real intention of hacking on it anyway.

So I instead proceeded to the actual procedure of upgrading the thing.

Unzip the zip file and put the file in the root dir of a FAT32-formatted usb-stick. The instructions of course didn’t say it needs to be FAT32 but I used that and it worked, and I just smug in the dark to how a manufacturer like this just assumes that we would have FAT32 on our usb-sticks…

But I digress. When I inserted the upgrade USB, the TV switched itself off, was dark for a short while and then turned itself on again and showed the firmware upgrade screen.

The process was very fast, just like 30-40 seconds or something like that and then it was done and asked me to remove the “media” and restart. Of course we know that a usb stick is “media” so I removed it from the TV set.

The instructions were very clear that to “restart” the TV I must only press the ON/OFF button on the remote once and only once. So I was careful to do just that… 😉

Nothing strange happened, but after a brief moment of black screen the regular and familiar interface.

I jumped into the firmware version menu to check it out and yes, it shows an updated version now:

I did a quick check to see if I could detect my previous quirks now, but they may really be gone. They’ve been related to sound through HDMI and some graphical “glitches” when feeding the TV with full HD from a laptop.

So, with this firmware that was shipped many months after I got my TV, I seem to have gotten a better product.

I haven’t yet tested this new version to a significant degree so I don’t know yet if I’ve gotten some new nasty side-effects from it, as sometimes these kinds of firmware upgrades really cause you pain when something that formerly used to work so good suddenly turns out to not work that good any longer.

My open source TV

For Christmas this year I decided to surprise my wife with a new TV. To sum it up: hiding a 42″ TV in the closet was hard.LCD TV

Oh well, the model I got for her is a Philips 42PFL7404H. It’s really nothing magical about it, it’s a rather standard LCD TV.

What did make me smile however, was the little paper I found next to the manual (which is done in 30 languages!) and the quick-start guide, a two-sided legal-sized paper that lists all the open source products they’ve used in the TV as well as the GPL and LGPL licenses spelled out in their entirety. Anyway, the products this TV claims to use are:

Linux kernel, Flash Eraseall, Nandwrite, Helper Application, Libc, Librt, Libm, Libpthread, libgcc, libstd++, Diet libc, libgphoto2, vsnprintf, GIF reading routines, base64.

I find it noticeable that there’s no shell or busybox in that list, which in my book is a rather unusual embedded Linux setup.

Neuros OSD 2.0

For you who are into things like open source hardware for your videos, it can be interesting to note Neuros‘ recent posting of their planned specs for their upcoming OSD 2.0 player that I guess then will replace the current Neuros OSD model.Neuros OSD 2.0

In hard techy interesting terms: they plan to upgrade to Texas Instruments Davinci 6446 chipset, which is a 300MHz ARM9 with a C64x DSP core embedded. Pretty much like the existing DM320 one, but it seems with a great deal of more horse power under the hood. Given their specs paper, it will support a lot of formats and at least partially up to HD resolutions. It’ll also support internal harddrive and offer 256MB RAM and 256MB internal NAND flash.

Personally I don’t care that much as I don’t even have analogue TV and don’t download/have many movies to watch and my existing DVB-T box has fine recording abilities and my DVD is good enough for my kids to repeatedly watch the same animated films over and over and over…

Oh btw, if this sounds like your kind of backyard and other things combine well, Neuros is hiring Linux developers for what I believe is this hardware.

(sorry for the crappy quality of the pic but I nicked it from the PDF)