The state and rate of HTTP/2 adoption

Tuesday, March 31st, 2015

http2 logoThe protocol HTTP/2 as defined in the draft-17 was approved by the IESG and is being implemented and deployed widely on the Internet today, even before it has turned up as an actual RFC. Back in February, already upwards 5% or maybe even more of the web traffic was using HTTP/2.

My prediction: We’ll see >10% usage by the end of the year, possibly as much as 20-30% a little depending on how fast some of the major and most popular platforms will switch (Facebook, Instagram, Tumblr, Yahoo and others). In 2016 we might see HTTP/2 serve a majority of all HTTP requests – done by browsers at least.

Counted how? Yeah the second I mention a rate I know you guys will start throwing me hard questions like exactly what do I mean. What is Internet and how would I count this? Let me express it loosely: the share of HTTP requests (by volume of requests, not by bandwidth of data and not just counting browsers). I don’t know how to measure it and we can debate the numbers in December and I guess we can all end up being right depending on what we think is the right way to count!

Who am I to tell? I’m just a person deeply interested in protocols and HTTP/2, so I’ve been involved in the HTTP work group for years and I also work on several HTTP/2 implementations. You can guess as well as I, but this just happens to be my blog!

The HTTP/2 Implementations wiki page currently lists 36 different implementations. Let’s take a closer look at the current situation and prospects in some areas.

Browsers

Firefox and Chome have solid support since a while back. Just use a recent version and you’re good.

Internet Explorer has been shown in a tech preview that spoke HTTP/2 fine. So, run that or wait for it to ship in a public version soon.

There are no news about this from Apple regarding support in Safari. Give up on them and switch over to a browser that keeps up!

Other browsers? Ask them what they do, or replace them with a browser that supports HTTP/2 already.

My estimate: By the end of 2015 the leading browsers with a market share way over 50% combined will support HTTP/2.

Server software

Apache HTTPd is still the most popular web server software on the planet. mod_h2 is a recent module for it that can speak HTTP/2 – still in “alpha” state. Give it time and help out in other ways and it will pay off.

Nginx has told the world they’ll ship HTTP/2 support by the end of 2015.

IIS was showing off HTTP/2 in the Windows 10 tech preview.

H2O is a newcomer on the market with focus on performance and they ship with HTTP/2 support since a while back already.

nghttp2 offers a HTTP/2 => HTTP/1.1 proxy (and lots more) to front your old server with and can then help you deploy HTTP/2 at once.

Apache Traffic Server supports HTTP/2 fine. Will show up in a release soon.

Also, netty, jetty and others are already on board.

HTTPS initiatives like Let’s Encrypt, helps to make it even easier to deploy and run HTTPS on your own sites which will smooth the way for HTTP/2 deployments on smaller sites as well. Getting sites onto the TLS train will remain a hurdle and will be perhaps the single biggest obstacle to get even more adoption.

My estimate: By the end of 2015 the leading HTTP server products with a market share of more than 80% of the server market will support HTTP/2.

Proxies

Squid works on HTTP/2 support.

HAproxy? I haven’t gotten a straight answer from that team, but Willy Tarreau has been actively participating in the HTTP/2 work all the time so I expect them to have work in progress.

While very critical to the protocol, PHK of the Varnish project has said that Varnish will support it if it gets traction.

My estimate: By the end of 2015, the leading proxy software projects will start to have or are already shipping HTTP/2 support.

Services

Google (including Youtube and other sites in the Google family) and Twitter have ran HTTP/2 enabled for months already.

Lots of existing services offer SPDY today and I would imagine most of them are considering and pondering on how to switch to HTTP/2 as Chrome has already announced them going to drop SPDY during 2016 and Firefox will also abandon SPDY at some point.

My estimate: By the end of 2015 lots of the top sites of the world will be serving HTTP/2 or will be working on doing it.

Content Delivery Networks

Akamai plans to ship HTTP/2 by the end of the year. Cloudflare have stated that they “will support HTTP/2 once NGINX with it becomes available“.

Amazon has not given any response publicly that I can find for when they will support HTTP/2 on their services.

Not a totally bright situation but I also believe (or hope) that as soon as one or two of the bigger CDN players start to offer HTTP/2 the others might feel a bigger pressure to follow suit.

Non-browser clients

curl and libcurl support HTTP/2 since months back, and the HTTP/2 implementations page lists available implementations for just about all major languages now. Like node-http2 for javascript, http2-perl, http2 for Go, Hyper for Python, OkHttp for Java, http-2 for Ruby and more. If you do HTTP today, you should be able to switch over to HTTP/2 relatively easy.

More?

I’m sure I’ve forgotten a few obvious points but I might update this as we go as soon as my dear readers point out my faults and mistakes!

How long is HTTP/1.1 going to be around?

My estimate: HTTP 1.1 will be around for many years to come. There is going to be a double-digit percentage share of the existing sites on the Internet (and who knows how many that aren’t even accessible from the Internet) for the foreseeable future. For technical reasons, for philosophical reasons and for good old we’ll-never-touch-it-again reasons.

The survey

Finally, I asked friends on twitter, G+ and Facebook what they think the HTTP/2 share would be by the end of 2015 with the help of a little poll. This does of course not make it into any sound or statistically safe number but is still just a collection of what a set of random people guessed. A quick poll to get a rough feel. This is how the 64 responses I received were distributed:

http2 share at end of 2015

Evidently, if you take a median out of these results you can see that the middle point is between 5-10 and 10-15. I’ll make it easy and say that the poll showed a group estimate on 10%. Ten percent of the total HTTP traffic to be HTTP/2 at the end of 2015.

I didn’t vote here but I would’ve checked the 15-20 choice, thus a fair bit over the median but only slightly into the top quarter..

In plain numbers this was the distribution of the guesses:

0-5% 29.1% (19)
5-10% 21.8% (13)
10-15% 14.5% (10)
15-20% 10.9% (7)
20-25% 9.1% (6)
25-30% 3.6% (2)
30-40% 3.6% (3)
40-50% 3.6% (2)
more than 50% 3.6% (2)

TLS in HTTP/2

Friday, March 6th, 2015

SSL padlockI’ve written the http2 explained document and I’ve done several talks about HTTP/2. I’ve gotten a lot of questions about TLS in association with HTTP/2 due to this, and I want to address some of them here.

TLS is not mandatory

In the HTTP/2 specification that has been approved and that is about to become an official RFC any day now, there is no language that mandates the use of TLS for securing the protocol. On the contrary, the spec clearly explains how to use it both in clear text (over plain TCP) as well as over TLS. TLS is not mandatory for HTTP/2.

TLS mandatory in effect

While the spec doesn’t force anyone to implement HTTP/2 over TLS but allows you to do it over clear text TCP, representatives from both the Firefox and the Chrome development teams have expressed their intents to only implement HTTP/2 over TLS. This means HTTPS:// URLs are the only ones that will enable HTTP/2 for these browsers. Internet Explorer people have expressed that they intend to also support the new protocol without TLS, but when they shipped their first test version as part of the Windows 10 tech preview, that browser also only supported HTTP/2 over TLS. As of this writing, there has been no browser released to the public that speaks clear text HTTP/2. Most existing servers only speak HTTP/2 over TLS.

The difference between what the spec allows and what browsers will provide is the key here, and browsers and all other user-agents are all allowed and expected to each select their own chosen path forward.

If you’re implementing and deploying a server for HTTP/2, you pretty much have to do it for HTTPS to get users. And your clear text implementation will not be as tested…

A valid remark would be that browsers are not the only HTTP/2 user-agents and there are several such non-browser implementations that implement the non-TLS version of the protocol, but I still believe that the browsers’ impact on this will be notable.

Stricter TLS

When opting to speak HTTP/2 over TLS, the spec mandates stricter TLS requirements than what most clients ever have enforced for normal HTTP 1.1 over TLS.

It says TLS 1.2 or later is a MUST. It forbids compression and renegotiation. It specifies fairly detailed “worst acceptable” key sizes and cipher suites. HTTP/2 will simply use safer TLS.

Another detail here is that HTTP/2 over TLS requires the use of ALPN which is a relatively new TLS extension, RFC 7301, which helps us negotiate the new HTTP version without losing valuable time or network packet round-trips.

TLS-only encourages more HTTPS

Since browsers only speak HTTP/2 over TLS (so far at least), sites that want HTTP/2 enabled must do it over HTTPS to get users. It provides a gentle pressure on sites to offer proper HTTPS. It pushes more people over to end-to-end TLS encrypted connections.

This (more HTTPS) is generally considered a good thing by me and us who are concerned about users and users’ right to privacy and right to avoid mass surveillance.

Why not mandatory TLS?

The fact that it didn’t get in the spec as mandatory was because quite simply there was never a consensus that it was a good idea for the protocol. A large enough part of the working group’s participants spoke up against the notion of mandatory TLS for HTTP/2. TLS was not mandatory before so the starting point was without mandatory TLS and we didn’t manage to get to another stand-point.

When I mention this in discussions with people the immediate follow-up question is…

No really, why not mandatory TLS?

The motivations why anyone would be against TLS for HTTP/2 are plentiful. Let me address the ones I hear most commonly, in an order that I think shows the importance of the arguments from those who argued them.

1. A desire to inspect HTTP traffic

looking-glassThere is a claimed “need” to inspect or intercept HTTP traffic for various reasons. Prisons, schools, anti-virus, IPR-protection, local law requirements, whatever are mentioned. The absolute requirement to cache things in a proxy is also often bundled with this, saying that you can never build a decent network on an airplane or with a satellite link etc without caching that has to be done with intercepts.

Of course, MITMing proxies that terminate SSL traffic are not even rare these days and HTTP/2 can’t do much about limiting the use of such mechanisms.

2. Think of the little ones

small-big-dogSmall devices cannot handle the extra TLS burden“. Either because of the extra CPU load that comes with TLS or because of the cert management in a billion printers/fridges/routers etc. Certificates also expire regularly and need to be updated in the field.

Of course there will be a least acceptable system performance required to do TLS decently and there will always be systems that fall below that threshold.

3. Certificates are too expensive

The price of certificates for servers are historically often brought up as an argument against TLS even it isn’t really HTTP/2 related and I don’t think it was ever an argument that was particularly strong against TLS within HTTP/2. Several CAs now offer zero-cost or very close to zero-cost certificates these days and with the upcoming efforts like letsencrypt.com, chances are it’ll become even better in the not so distant future.

pile-of-moneyRecently someone even claimed that HTTPS limits the freedom of users since you need to give personal information away (he said) in order to get a certificate for your server. This was not a price he was willing to pay apparently. This is however simply not true for the simplest kinds of certificates. For Domain Validated (DV) certificates you usually only have to prove that you “control” the domain in question in some way. Usually by being able to receive email to a specific receiver within the domain.

4. The CA system is broken

TLS of today requires a PKI system where there are trusted certificate authorities that sign certificates and this leads to a situation where all modern browsers trust several hundred CAs to do this right. I don’t think a lot of people are happy with this and believe this is the ultimate security solution. There’s a portion of the Internet that advocates for DANE (DNSSEC) to address parts of the problem, while others work on gradual band-aids like Certificate Transparency and OCSP stapling to make it suck less.

please trust me

My personal belief is that rejecting TLS on the grounds that it isn’t good enough or not perfect is a weak argument. TLS and HTTPS are the best way we currently have to secure web sites. I wouldn’t mind seeing it improved in all sorts of ways but I don’t believe running protocols clear text until we have designed and deployed the next generation secure protocol is a good idea – and I think it will take a long time (if ever) until we see a TLS replacement.

Who were against mandatory TLS?

Yeah, lots of people ask me this, but I will refrain from naming specific people or companies here since I have no plans on getting into debates with them about details and subtleties in the way I portrait their arguments. You can find them yourself if you just want to and you can most certainly make educated guesses without even doing so.

What about opportunistic security?

A text about TLS in HTTP/2 can’t be complete without mentioning this part. A lot of work in the IETF these days are going on around introducing and making sure opportunistic security is used for protocols. It was also included in the HTTP/2 draft for a while but was moved out from the core spec in the name of simplification and because it could be done anyway without being part of the spec. Also, far from everyone believes opportunistic security is a good idea. The opponents tend to say that it will hinder the adoption of “real” HTTPS for sites. I don’t believe that, but I respect that opinion because it is a guess as to how users will act just as well as my guess is they won’t act like that!

Opportunistic security for HTTP is now being pursued outside of the HTTP/2 spec and allows clients to upgrade plain TCP connections to instead do “unauthenticated TLS” connections. And yes, it should always be emphasized: with opportunistic security, there should never be a “padlock” symbol or anything that would suggest that the connection is “secure”.

Firefox supports opportunistic security for HTTP and it will be enabled by default from Firefox 37.

Translations

Пост доступен на сайте softdroid.net: Восстановление: TLS в HTTP/2. (Russian)

More HTTP framing attempts

Monday, March 2nd, 2015

Previously, in my exciting series “improving the HTTP framing checks in Firefox” we learned that I landed a patch, got it backed out, struggled to improve the checks and finally landed the fixed version only to eventually get that one backed out as well.

And now I’ve landed my third version. The amendment I did this time:

When receiving HTTP content that is content-encoded and compressed I learned that when receiving deflate compression there is basically no good way for us to know if the content gets prematurely cut off. They seem to lack the footer too often for it to make any sense in checking for that. gzip streams however end with a footer so they are easier to reliably detect when they are incomplete. (As was discovered before, the Content-Length: is far too often not updated by the server so it is instead wrongly showing the uncompressed size.)

This (deflate vs gzip) knowledge is now used by the patch, meaning that deflate compressed downloads can be cut off without the browser noticing…

Will this version of the fix actually stick? I don’t know. There’s lots of bad voodoo out there in the HTTP world and I’m putting my finger right in the middle of some of it with this change. I’m pretty sure I’ve not written my last blog post on this topic just yet… If it sticks this time, it should show up in Firefox 39.

bolt-cutter

curl, smiley-URLs and libc

Tuesday, February 24th, 2015

Some interesting Unicode URLs have recently been seen used in the wild – like in this billboard ad campaign from Coca Cola, and a friend of mine asked me about curl in reference to these and how it deals with such URLs.

emojicoke-by-stevecoleuk-450

(Picture by stevencoleuk)

I ran some tests and decided to blog my observations since they are a bit curious. The exact URL I tried was ‘www.😃.ws’ (not the same smiley as shown on this billboard: 😂) – it is really hard to enter by hand so now is the time to appreciate your ability to cut and paste! It appears they registered several domains for a set of different smileys.

These smileys are not really allowed IDN (where IDN means International Domain Names) symbols which make these domains a bit different. They should not (see below for details) be converted to punycode before getting resolved but instead I assume that the pure UTF-8 sequence should or at least will be fed into the name resolver function. Well, either way it should either pass in punycode or the UTF-8 string.

If curl was built to use libidn, it still won’t convert this to punycode and the verbose output says “Failed to convert www.😃.ws to ACE; String preparation failed

curl (exact version doesn’t matter) using the stock threaded resolver

  • Debian Linux (glibc 2.19) – FAIL
  • Windows 7 - FAIL
  • Mac OS X 10.9 – SUCCESS

But then also perhaps to no surprise, the exact same results are shown if I try to ping those host names on these systems. It works on the mac, it fails on Linux and Windows. Wget 1.16 also fails on my Debian systems (just as a reference and I didn’t try it on any of the other platforms).

My curl build on Linux that uses c-ares for name resolving instead of glibc succeeds perfectly. host, nslookup and dig all work fine with it on Linux too (as well as nslookup on Windows):

$ host www.😃.ws
www.\240\159\152\131.ws has address 64.70.19.202
$ ping www.😃.ws
ping: unknown host www.😃.ws

While the same command sequence on the mac shows:

$ host www.😃.ws
www.\240\159\152\131.ws has address 64.70.19.202
$ ping www.😃.ws
PING www.😃.ws (64.70.19.202): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 64.70.19.202: icmp_seq=0 ttl=44 time=191.689 ms
64 bytes from 64.70.19.202: icmp_seq=1 ttl=44 time=191.124 ms

Slightly interesting additional tidbit: if I rebuild curl to use gethostbyname_r() instead of getaddrinfo() it works just like on the mac, so clearly this is glibc having an opinion on how this should work when given this UTF-8 hostname.

Pasting in the URL into Firefox and Chrome works just fine. They both convert the name to punycode and use “www.xn--h28h.ws” which then resolves to the same IPv4 address.

Update: as was pointed out in a comment below, the “64.70.19.202″ IP address is not the correct IP for the site. It is just the registrar’s landing page so it sends back that response to any host or domain name in the .ws domain that doesn’t exist!

What do the IDN specs say?

The U-263A smileyThis is not my area of expertise. I had to consult Patrik Fältström here to get this straightened out (but please if I got something wrong here the mistake is still all mine). Apparently this smiley is allowed in RFC 3940 (IDNA2003), but that has been replaced by RFC 5890-5892 (IDNA2008) where this is DISALLOWED. If you read the spec, this is 263A.

So, depending on which spec you follow it was a valid IDN character or it isn’t anymore.

What does the libc docs say?

The POSIX docs for getaddrinfo doesn’t contain enough info to tell who’s right but it doesn’t forbid UTF-8 encoded strings. The regular glibc docs for getaddrinfo also doesn’t say anything and interestingly, the Apple Mac OS X version of the docs says just as little.

With this complete lack of guidance, it is hardly any additional surprise that the glibc gethostbyname docs also doesn’t mention what it does in this case but clearly it doesn’t do the same as getaddrinfo in the glibc case at least.

What’s on the actual site?

A redirect to www.emoticoke.com which shows a rather boring page.

emoticoke

Who’s right?

I don’t know. What do you think?

Tightening Firefox’s HTTP framing – again

Thursday, February 12th, 2015

An old http1.1 frameCall me crazy, but I’m at it again. First a little resume from our previous episodes in this exciting saga:

Chapter 1: I closed the 10+ year old bug that made the Firefox download manager not detect failed downloads, simply because Firefox didn’t care if the HTTP 1.1 Content-Length was larger than what was actually saved – after the connection potentially was cut off for example. There were additional details, but that was the bigger part.

Chapter 2: After having been included all the way to public release, we got a whole slew of bug reports immediately when Firefox 33 shipped and we had to revert parts of the fix I did.

Chapter 3.

Will it land before it turns 11 years old? The bug was originally submitted 2004-03-16.

Since chapter two of this drama brought back the original bugs again we still have to do something about them. I fully understand if not that many readers of this can even keep up of all this back and forth and juggling of HTTP protocol details, but this time we’re putting back the stricter frame checks with a few extra conditions to allow a few violations to remain but detect and react on others!

Here’s how I addressed this issue. I wanted to make the checks stricter but still allow some common protocol violations.

In particular I needed to allow two particular flaws that have proven to be somewhat common in the wild and were the reasons for the previous fix being backed out again:

A – HTTP chunk-encoded responses that lack the final 0-sized chunk.

B – HTTP gzipped responses where the Content-Length is not the same as the actual contents.

So, in order to allow A + B and yet be able to detect prematurely cut off transfers I decided to:

  1. Detect incomplete chunks then the transfer has ended. So, if a chunk-encoded transfer ends on exactly a chunk boundary we consider that fine. Good: This will allow case (A) to be considered fine. Bad: It will make us not detect a certain amount of cut-offs.
  2. When receiving a gzipped response, we consider a gzip stream that doesn’t end fine according to the gzip decompressing state machine to be a partial transfer. IOW: if a gzipped transfer ends fine according to the decompressor, we do not check for size misalignment. This allows case (B) as long as the content could be decoded.
  3. When receiving HTTP that isn’t content-encoded/compressed (like in case 2) and not chunked (like in case 1), perform the size comparison between Content-Length: and the actual size received and consider a mismatch to mean a NS_ERROR_NET_PARTIAL_TRANSFER error.

Firefox BallPrefs

When my first fix was backed out, it was actually not removed but was just put behind a config string (pref as we call it) named “network.http.enforce-framing.http1“. If you set that to true, Firefox will behave as it did with my original fix applied. It makes the HTTP1.1 framing fairly strict and standard compliant. In order to not mess with that setting that now has been around for a while (and I’ve also had it set to true for a while in my browser and I have not seen any problems with doing it this way), I decided to introduce my new changes pref’ed behind a separate variable.

network.http.enforce-framing.soft” is the new pref that is set to true by default with my patch. It will make Firefox do the detections outlined in 1 – 3 and setting it to false will disable those checks again.

Now I only hope there won’t ever be any chapter 4 in this story… If things go well, this will appear in Firefox 38.

Chromium

But how do they solve these problems in the Chromium project? They have slightly different heuristics (with the small disclaimer that I haven’t read their code for this in a while so details may have changed). First of all, they do not allow a missing final 0-chunk. Then, they basically allow any sort of misaligned size when the content is gzipped.

Update: this patch was subsequently backed out again due to several bug reports about it. I have yet to analyze exactly what went wrong.

HTTP/2 is at 5%

Tuesday, February 10th, 2015

http2 logoHere follow some numbers extracted from my recent HTTP/2 presentation.

First: HTTP/2 is not finalized yet and it is not yet in RFC status, even though things are progressing nicely within the IETF. With some luck we reach RFC status within Q1 this year.

On January 13th 2015, Firefox 35 was released with HTTP/2 enabled by default. Firefox was already running it enabled before that in beta and development versions.

Chrome has also been sporting HTTP/2 support in development versions since many moths back where it could easily be manually enabled. Chrome 40 was the first main release shipped with HTTP/2 enabled by default, but it has so far only been enabled for a very small fraction of the user-base.

On January 28th 2015, Google reported to me by email that they saw HTTP/2 being used in 5% of their global traffic (que all relevant disclaimers that this is not statistically safe numbers). This, close after a shaky period with Google having had their HTTP/2 services disabled through parts of the Christmas holidays (due to bugs) – and as explained above, there’s been no time for any mainstream browser to use HTTP/2 by default for very long!

Further data points: Mozilla collects telemetry data from Firefox users who opted-in to it, and it collects numbers on “HTTP Protocol Version Used on Response”. On February 10, it reports that Firefox 35 users have got their responses to report HTTP/2 in 9% of all responses (out of more than 340 billion reported responses). The Telemetry for Firefox Nightly 38 even reports HTTP/2 in 14% of all responses (based on a much smaller sample collection), which I guess could very well be because users on such a bleeding edge version are more experimental by nature.

In these Firefox stats we see that recently, the number of HTTP/2 responses outnumber the HTTP/1.0 responses 9 to 1.

Changing networks with Linux

Friday, January 16th, 2015

A rather long time ago I blogged about my work to better deal with changing networks while Firefox is running, and the change was then pushed for Android and I subsequently pushed the same functionality for Firefox on Mac.

Today I’ve landed yet another change, which detects network changes on Firefox OS and Linux.

Firefox Nightly screenshotAs Firefox OS uses a Linux kernel, I ended up doing the same fix for both the Firefox OS devices as for Firefox on Linux desktop: I open a socket in the AF_NETLINK family and listen on the stream of messages the kernel sends when there are network updates. This way we’re told when the routing tables update or when we get a new IP address etc. I consider this way better than the NotifyIpInterfaceChange() API Windows provides, as this allows us to filter what we’re interested in. The windows API makes that rather complicated and in fact a lot of the times when we get the notification on windows it isn’t clear to me why!

The Mac API way is what I would consider even more obscure, but then I’m not at all used to their way of doing things and how you add things to the event handlers etc.

The journey to the landing of this particular patch was once again long and bumpy and full of sweat in this tradition that seem seems to be my destiny, and this time I ran into problems with the Firefox OS emulator which seems to have some interesting bugs that cause my code to not work properly and as a result of that our automated tests failed: occasionally data sent over a pipe or socketpair doesn’t end up in the receiving end. In my case this means that my signal to the child thread to die would sometimes not be noticed and thus the thread wouldn’t exit and die as intended.

I ended up implementing a work-around that makes it work even if the emulator eats the data by also checking a shared should-I-shutdown-now flag every once in a while. For more specific details on that, see the bug.

Changing networks on Mac with Firefox

Thursday, October 30th, 2014

Not too long ago I blogged about my work to better deal with changing networks while Firefox is running. That job was basically two parts.

A) generic code to handle receiving such a network-changed event and then

B) a platform specific part that was for Windows that detected such a network change and sent the event

Today I’ve landed yet another fix for part B called bug 1079385, which detects network changes for Firefox on Mac OS X.

mac miniI’ve never programmed anything before on the Mac so this was sort of my christening in this environment. I mean, I’ve written countless of POSIX compliant programs including curl and friends that certainly builds and runs on Mac OS just fine, but I never before used the Mac-specific APIs to do things.

I got a mac mini just two weeks ago to work on this. Getting it up, prepared and my first Firefox built from source took all-in-all less than three hours. Learning the details of the mac API world was much more trouble and can’t say that I’m mastering it now either but I did find myself at least figuring out how to detect when IP addresses on the interfaces change and a changed address is a pretty good signal that the network changed somehow.

daniel.haxx.se episode 8

Monday, October 27th, 2014

Today I hesitated to make my new weekly video episode. I looked at the viewers number and how they basically have dwindled the last few weeks. I’m not making this video series interesting enough for a very large crowd of people. I’m re-evaluating if I should do them at all, or if I can do something to spice them up…

… or perhaps just not look at the viewers numbers at all and just do what think is fun?

I decided I’ll go with the latter for now. After all, I enjoy making these and they usually give me some interesting feedback and discussions even if the numbers are really low. What good is a number anyway?

This week’s episode:

Personal

Firefox

Fun

HTTP/2

TALKS

  • I’m offering two talks for FOSDEM

curl

  • release next Wednesday
  • bug fixing period
  • security advisory is pending

wget

Stricter HTTP 1.1 framing good bye

Sunday, October 26th, 2014

I worked on a patch for Firefox bug 237623 to make sure Firefox would use a stricter check for “HTTP 1.1 framing”, checking that Content-Length is correct and that there’s no broken chunked encoding pieces. I was happy to close an over 10 years old bug when the fix landed in June 2014.

The fix landed and has not caused any grief all the way since June through to the actual live release (Nightlies, Aurora, Beta etc). This change finally shipped in Firefox 33 and I had more or less already started to forget about it, and now things went south really fast.

The amount of broken servers ended up too massive for us and we had to backpedal. The largest amount of problems can be split up in these two categories:

  1. Servers that deliver gzipped content and sends a Content-Length: for the uncompressed data. This seems to be commonly done with old mod_deflate and mod_fastcgi versions on Apache, but we also saw people using IIS reporting this symptom.
  2. Servers that deliver chunked-encoding but who skip the final zero-size chunk so that the stream actually never really ends.

We recognize that not everyone can have the servers fixed – even if all these servers should still be fixed! We now make these HTTP 1.1 framing problems get detected but only cause a problem if a certain pref variable is set (network.http.enforce-framing.http1), and since that is disabled by default they will be silently ignored much like before. The Internet is a more broken and more sad place than I want to accept at times.

We haven’t fully worked out how to also make the download manager (ie the thing that downloads things directly to disk, without showing it in the browser) happy, which was the original reason for bug 237623…

Although the code may now no longer alert anything about HTTP 1.1 framing problems, it will now at least mark the connection not due for re-use which will be a big boost compared to before since these broken framing cases really hurt persistent connections use. The partial transfer return codes for broken SPDY and HTTP/2 transfers remain though and I hope to be able to remain stricter with these newer protocols.

This partial reversion will land ASAP and get merged into patch releases of Firefox 33 and later.

Finally, to top this off. Here’s a picture of an old HTTP 1.1 frame so that you know what we’re talking about.

An old http1.1 frame