Tag Archives: anniversary

Twenty years, 1998 – 2018

Do you remember this exact day, twenty years ago? March 20, 1998. What exactly happened that day? I'll tell you what I did then.

First a quick reminder of the state of popular culture at the time: three days later, on the 23rd, the movie Titanic would tangent the record and win eleven academy awards. Its theme song "My heart will go on" was in the top of the music charts around this time.

I was 27 years old and I worked full-time as a software engineer, mostly with embedded systems. I had already been developing software as a profession for several years then. At this moment in time I was involved as a consultant in a (rather boring) project for Ericsson Telecom ETX, in Nacka Strand in the south eastern general Stockholm area.

At some point during that Friday (I don't remember the details, but presumably it happened during the late evening), I packaged up the source code of the URL transfer tool we were working on and uploaded it to my personal web site to share it with the world. It was the first release ever of the project under the new name: curl. The tool was already supporting HTTP, FTP and GOPHER - including uploads for the two first protocols.

It would take more than a year after this day until we started hosting the curl project on its own dedicated web site. curl.haxx.nu went live in August 1999, and it was changed again to curl.haxx.se in June the following year, a URL and name we've kept since.

(this is the first curl logo we used, made in 1998 by Henrik Hellerstedt)

In my flat in Solna (just north of Stockholm, Sweden) I already then spent a lot of spare time, mostly late nights, in front of my computer. Back then, an Intel Pentium 120Mhz based desktop PC with a huge 19" Nokia CRT monitor, on which I dialed up to my work's modem pool to access the Internet and to log in to the Unix machines there on which I did a lot of the early curl development. On SunOS, Solaris and Linux.

In Stockholm, that Friday started out with sub-zero degrees Celsius but the temperature climbed up to a few positive degrees during the day and there was no snow on the ground. Pretty standard March weather in Stockholm. This is usually a period when the light is slowly coming back (winters are really dark here) but the temperatures remind us that spring still isn't quite here.

curl 4.0 was just a little more than 2000 lines of C code. It featured 23 command line options. curl 4.0 introduced support for the FTP PORT command and now it could do ftp uploads that append to the remote file. The version number was bumped up from the 3.12 which was the last version number used by the tool under the old name, urlget.

This is what the web site looked like in December 1998, the oldest capture I could find. Extracted from archive.org so unfortunately two graphical elements are missing!

It was far from an immediate success. An old note mentions how curl 4.8 (released the summer of 1998) was downloaded more than 300 times from the site. In August 1999, we counted 1300 weekly visits on the web site. It took time to get people to discover curl and make it into the tool users wanted. By September 1999 curl had already grown to 15K lines of code

In August 2000 we shipped the first version of libcurl: all the networking transfer powers of curl in a library, ready to be used by your applications. PHP was one of the absolutely first users of libcurl and that certainly helped to drive the early use.

A year later, in August 2001, when Apple started shipping curl by default in Mac OS X 10.1 curl was already widely available in Linux and BSD package collections.

By June 2002, we counted 13000 weekly visits on the site and we had grown to 35K lines of code. And it would not stop there...

Twenty years is both nothing at all and at the same time what feels like an eternity. Just three weeks before curl 4.0 shipped, Mozilla was founded. Google wasn't founded until six months after. This was long before Facebook or Twitter had even been considered. Certainly a different era. Even the term open source was coined just a month prior to this curl release.

Growth factors over 20 years in the project:

Supported protocols: 7.67x
Command line options: 9x
Lines of code: 75x
Contributors: 100x
Weekly web site visitors: 1,400x
End users using (something that runs) the code: 4,000,000x
Stickers with the curl logo: infinity

Twenty years since the first ever curl release. Of course, it took time to make that first release too so the work is older. curl is the third name or incarnation of the project that I first got involved with already in late 1996...

 

curl is 18 years old tomorrow

Another notch on the wall as we've reached the esteemed age of 18 years in the cURL project. 9 releases were shipped since our last birthday and we managed to fix no less than a total of 457 bugs in that time.

18notches

On this single day in history...

20,000 persons will be visiting the web site, transferring over 4GB of data.

1.3 bug fixes will get pushed to the git repository (out of the 3 commits made)

300 git clones are made of the curl source tree, by 100 unique users.

4000 curl source archives will be downloaded from the curl web site

8 mails get posted on the curl mailing lists (at least one of them will be posted by me).

I will spend roughly 2 hours on curl related work. Mostly answering mail, bug reports and debugging, but also maintaining infrastructure, poke on the web site and if lucky, actually spending a few minutes writing new code.

Every human in the connected world will use at least one service,  tool or application that runs curl.

Happy birthday to us all!

curlyears plus equals one

BirthdaycakeThirteen years ago I released the first version of curl to the world - on March 20 1998. curl is now a teenage project and there's no slowdown or end in sight.

So what does a project like ours introduce after having existed for so long? The recent year has been full of activities in the project, and here's a run down with some of the stuff that has been going on:

We switched source code versioning system from CVS to git

gopher support got back into curl

support for RTMP was added

Two additional SSL libraries are now supported: PolarSSL and axTLS, making it a total of seven

70 persons provided code into the git repository, making the THANKS document now list 854 names.

About 1000 commits were made - out of a total of almost 14000 (counted from Dec 1999) so it makes this year slightly under average in terms of commit rate.

6 releases were shipped with a total of 179 bugfixes

1 security flaw was found and fixed

More than 4900 mails were posted to the curl mailing lists

We introduced a unit test system

Over 1400GB of data was downloaded from the curl web site

During the end of this period, 45% of our web visitors used Firefox, 23% used Chrome and less than 20% used IE. 75% were on Windows, 13% on Linux and 10% on Mac.

cURL

curl ten years today

Birthdaycake

On March 20th 1998 curl 4 was released. It was the first curl release ever even if already at version 4 since we kept the version number from the previous projects we did before curl - using other names. We started it all with having the tool named httpget (which was an existing small tool written by Rafael Sagula), soon changed name to urlget to end up with curl - all renames happening due to shifting features and focus.

Like many other projects, this started because of an itch. I wanted to get currency rates off the internet to allow an IRC bot to be able to provide an "exchange service" for users with accurate up-to-date rates. I thought the existing projects I found all did too much or did the wrong thing. That bot and service is now gone since long.

curl has been a truly portable project from day 1, and the first windows build was already urlget 2.1 (pre-curl). autoconf support for the build process was added in October 1998.

Unfortunately I don't have the original release 4 tarball left anymore, the closest one I have is curl 4.8 (dated August 31 1998). curl 4.8 is about 3400 lines of code. Today we're totaling in well over 100K source lines, so it has grown over 30 times!

I had no big plans for curl nor did I think very much about the future of the project. I just added the features I and my fellow contributors wanted to have for the moment. That's actually pretty much how the project has continued to work. We don't have many long-term plans for what to do with it, we mostly look just inches ahead of our noses and act accordingly.

During the version 6 period (Sep 1999 - Mar 2000) we learned that curl was getting popular, was useful and worked rather well, so the work on providing a libcurl started. We wanted to offer other applications the ability to use curl's file transfer powers. Version 7.1 was released in August 2000 and thus libcurl was officially born.

curl and libcurl remained being a rather low-key project, I just work on it on my spare time and there are no full-time developers paid to work on this project - apart from some occasional sub-projects now and then that have been sponsored by companies and organizations. (See later on for an example.)

Slowly but surely more and more people started using libcurl and contributed with bug reports and patches. When the project turned 5 years in 2003 I collected all the names of all contributors so far and I reached the number 270. I found the number very high and I was mostly kidding when I said I hoped we would double that amount by the time we celebrate our tenth anniversary. Of course we've more than doubled that amount today when we have more than 620 named contributors so far - and continuously adding new ones with every release.

During this journey of a decade, I've remained the lead developer and project leader but we're now some 10 developers with commit access (that also use it) and I try to be open and responsive in order to attract more developers to come aboard, to listen to their advice and ideas and to be sensitive on what our users want from us.

In 2005 I was lucky enough to get a grant from the Swedish IIS organization for the purpose of developing a new event-based API for libcurl to better deal with very large amount of connections, the problem so nicely called c10k.

In the days when our humble project turns 10, I spend about two hours spare time per day on the project and it is my primary hobby, we make 5-6 releases per year, we get about 7000 unique visitors on the web site a normal day, about one million curl packages are downloaded per year - from our servers.

Today, libcurl is feature-rich, portable, very widely used, very fast, well supported and there are no signs of stagnation in release nor development pace. In fact, looking at the source-code growth over the last couple of years we can see a pretty stable and continuous growth:

curl source code growth

Just as I never looked ahead and planned for the future much in the past, I don't do that now either so I really don't know and can't tell what the future will hold for us. We'll just continue to develop the world's best client-side file transfer library, to make it even more solid for the foreseeable future, to make it do the things users and developers out there think it should do. Possibly that involves adding support for more protocols, removing some of the less popular ones or simply by enhancing how we support the existing ones.

Join the mailing lists and join us for the next ten years to come!