Tag Archives: social life

Snaxx delivers

A pint of guinnessLate in the year 1999 I quit my job. I handed over a signed paper where I wrote that I quit and then I started my new job first thing in the year 2000. I had a bunch of friends at the work I left and together with my closest friends (who coincidentally also switched jobs at roughly the same time) we decided we needed a way to keep in touch with friends that isn't associated with our current employer.

The fix, the "employer independent" social thing to help us keep in touch with friends and colleagues in the industry, started on the last of February 2000. The 29th of February, since it was a leap year and that fact alone is a subject that itself must've been discussed at that meetup.

Snaxx was born.

Snaxx is getting a bunch of friends to a pub somewhere in Stockholm. Preferably a pub with lots of great beers and a sensible sound situation. That means as little music as possible and certainly no TVs or anything. We keep doing them at a pace of two or three per year or so.

Bishops Arms logo

Yesterday we had the 31st Snaxx and just under 30 guests showed up (that might actually have been the new all time high). We had many great beers, food and we argued over bug reporting, discussed source code formats, electric car charging, C64 nostalgia, mentioned Linux kernel debugging methods, how to transition from Erlang to javascript development and a whole load of other similarly very important topics. The Bishops Arms just happens to be a brand of pubs here that have a really sensible view on how to run pubs to be suitable for our events so yesterday we once again visited one of their places.

Thanks for a great time yesterday, friends! I'll be setting up a date for number 32 soon. I figure it'll be in the January 2015 time frame...If you want to get notified with an email, sign up yourself on the snaxx mailing list.

A few pictures from yesterday can be found on the Snaxx-31 G+ event page.

curl meetup at Fosdem 2012

The FOSDEM 2012 dates were recently revealed (4-5 February 2012).

A pint of guinness

I'd be happy to arrange a get-together for libcurl hackers at Fosdem this year. To me, Brussels, Belgium seems mid-europe enough to be able to attract a bunch of us:

  • libcurl application users/authors
  • libcurl binding hackers
  • libcurl contributors
  • ... and everyone else who's doing related activities or who just is interested

Potential subjects to discuss at such a meeting:

  • what's the most important stuff libcurl still lacks?
  • what's the least documented/understood parts of libcurl?
  • are there shared problems several/many libcurl bindings have to solve?
  • can we improve how we work/develop libcurl and bindings?
  • what kind of beer is best at a curl meetup?
  • [fill in your own curl related subject]

I would like at least 4-5 people voicing interest for this to be worthwhile for me to actually try to do anything. Please speak up on the libcurl mailing list, tweet me or mail me privately! The more people that are interested, the more planning and stuff we'll do for it.

Snaxx 21

HaxxYes!

It is now time to once again leave your dark and dusty corners of your office or closet, bring yourself up to speed on what currency we're using in this country and then unite with fellow hackers and technologists in Stockholm City during a fine September evening. The entire Haxx team is delighted to inform that Snaxx-21 is about to happen...

Monday, September 28th 2009

Time: around 18:30

Where: see the snaxx site!

As usual we're informal, and as our friends you're of course allowed and encouraged to bring other friends who are similar in spirit and who you think would appreciate an event such as this.

When you've decided to show up, please email me and say so.

There might even be free t-shirts involved this time!

Oh, and if you are a Stockholmer and didn't get this invite by mail already, let me know and I'll add you to the list of people who get this notice by the old trusty RFC822 way.

My IETF 75 Story

A while ago, like a couple of years ago, I joined the mailing list for the HTTPbis effort. That's the IETF work group which is working on producing an update to the HTTP 1.1 spec RFC2616 that clarifies it and removes things that nobody does or that doesn't work. That spec is huge and the number of conflicting statements or just generally muddy expressions is large. This work is not near completion yet.

So when I learned the IETF75 meeting was to be held here in Stockholm, I of course cheered the opportunity to get to join in the talks and meet the people here.IETF

IETF is basically just an informal bunch of people who likes internet protocols, "above the wire and below the application". The goal of the IETF is to make the Internet work better. This is the organization behind the RFCs. They wrote the specs for TCP, FTP, SMTP, POP3, HTTP and a wide range of other protocols we all use non-stop these days. I'm actually quite surprised IETF is so little known. When I mention the organization name, most people just give me a blank face back that reveals it just isn't known to very many "civilians".

IETF has meetings around the world 2 or 3 times per year, and every time some 1K-2K people join up and there's a week filled with working group meetings, talks and a lot of socializing and so on. The attitude is generally relaxed all over and very welcoming for newcomers (like me). Everyone can join any talk or discussion. There's simply no dress code, but everyone just wears whatever they think is comfortable.

The whole week was packed with scheduled talks and sessions, but I only spent roughly 1.5 days at the conference center as I had to get some "real work" done as well and quite honestly I didn't find sessions that matched my interest every single day anyway.

After the scheduled days, and between sessions and sometimes instead of the scheduled stuff, a lot of social events took place. People meet in informal gatherings, talk, plans, sessions and dinners. The organizers of this particular even also arranged two separate off-topic social events. As one of the old-timers I talked to said something like "this year was unusually productive, but just about all of that was done outside of the schedule"...

This time. The 75th IETF meeting was hosted by .se in Stockholm Sweden in the end of July 2009. 1230 persons had signed up to come. The entrance fee was 650 USD unless you wanted to pay very late or at the door, as then it was a 130 extra or so. Oh, and we got a t-shirt!

One amusing little detail: on the t-shirt we got there was a "free invite code" to the Spotify streaming music service. But when people at the IETF meeting tried to use it at the conference center, Spotify refused to accept the users claiming it doesn't work in the US! Clearly they're not using the most updated ip-geography database in the world! 😉

So let me quickly mention a few of the topics I caught and found interesting, some of which I've blogged about separately.

HTTP over SCTP

The guys in the SCTP team works on this draft on how to do HTTP the best possible way over SCTP. They cite tests that claim "web browsing" becomes a better experience when done over SCTP. I'm personally quite interested in this work and in SCTP in general and I hope to be able to play with making libcurl support this in a not too distant future.

How to select TCP or SCTP

Assuming that SCTP gets widespread adoption and even browsers and browser-like apps start support it. How should the clients figure out which transport mechanism to use? The problem is similar to the selection between IPv4 or IPv6 but for the IP choice we can at least use A and AAAA lookups. The suggestions that were presented basically argued for trying all combinations in parallel and going with the fastest to respond, but a few bright minds questioned the smartness of that as it scales very badly if more transport options are added and it potentially introduces a lot more (start-up) traffic.

Getting HTTP from multiple mirrors

What the authors call Multiserver HTTP, is a pretty small suggestion of a few additional HTTP headers that a server would be able to return to a client hinting about other URIs where the exact same file/resource can be downloaded from. A client would then get that resource in parallel from multiple HTTP servers using range requests. Quite inspired by other technologies such as bittorrent and metalink. This first draft faced some criticism of not using existing HTTP as it could, but the general spirit has been welcoming.

The presenter of the idea, Mike Hanley, also mentioned the ability to allow the server response include a wildcard mention, so that a server for example could hint that "other images from this dir path can also be found under this dir path on this other server". Thus a client would be able to download such images from multiple servers. This idea is not in that draft and I'm not personally sure I think it fits as nicely.

HTTP-state wg

During the IETF week, it was announced that the HTTP-state working group is being formed. It didn't actually happen on the actual meeting but still... See my separate blog post on http-state.

Multipath TCP

The idea and concept behind MPTCP was new to me but I quickly come to like the thought of getting this into network stacks around me. I hope this will grow up to become something fine! See my separate blog post on multipath tcp for all details.

IRI

I visited the IRI BOF and got some fine insights on the troubles of creating the IRI spec. Without revealing too much, it's quite clear sometimes that politics can be hard even in these surroundings...

tng - Transport Next Generation

What felt pretty "researchy" and still not really ready for adaption (or am I wrong?) is this effort they call Transport Next Generation. Their ideas include the concept of inserting a whole bunch of more layers into the typical network stuff, to for example move congestion handling into its own layer to be able to make it per network-segment basis instead of only doing end-to-end like today. Apparently they have tests and studies that suggest that the per network-segment basis can improve traffic a lot. These days a lot of the first part and last part of network accesses are done over wireless networks while the core center tends to still be physical cables.

DCCP

I found it interesting and amusing when they presented DCCP with all its bells and whistles, and then toward the end of the presentation it surfaces that they don't really know what DCCP would be used for and at the moment the work group is pretty much done but there's just nobody that's using the protocol...

HTTPbis

HTTPbis is more or less my "home" in the IETF. We had a meeting in which things were discussed, some decisions were made and some new topics were raised. RFC2616 is a monster of a spec and it certainly contains so much details, so many potentially conflicting statements and quite clearly very many implementers have interpreted sections differently, that doing these clarifications is a next to endless work. I figure the work will simply be deemed "done" one day, and the remaining confusions will then just be left. The good part is then that the new document should at least be heaps better than the former. It will certainly benefit future and existing HTTP implementers nonetheless.

And a bunch of the HTTPbis guys got together a bit outside of the meeting as well, so we get to talk quite a bit and top off the evening with a dinner...

OpenDNSSec

There was quite a lot of DNSSEC talk during the week, and it annoys me that I double-booked the evening they had their opendnssec release (or was it tech preview?) party so I couldn't go there and take advantage of my two free beers!

Observations

Apple laptops. A crushing majority of the people seemed to have Apple branded laptops, and nearly all presentations I saw were done with Apples.

Not too surprising, the male vs female ratio was very very high. I would guess 20:1 to 30:1, at least in those surrounding where I spent my time.

Upcoming Meetings

This week was lots of fun. More fun than I have had in a conference in a very long time. I'll definately consider going to some upcoming meetings, although the next one in Japan in November doesn't fit my schedule. Possibly Anaheim in March 2010 and even more likely the 78th meeting in Maastricht in July 2010.

Thanks everyone who was there. Thanks to the hosters for a great event. It was a blast!

HTTPbis at IETF75

Mark, one of the editors of the ongoing HTTPbis efforts, first mentioned that there wasn't going to be any HTTPbis meeting on the upcoming IETF75 meeting in Stockholm July 26-31, 2009. I felt a bit sorry for that since I live in Stockholm, I'm a bit involved in the HTTPbis work and I've never been to a IETF meeting.

It simply must have been due to my almighty powers, but apparently two of the editors are going here anyway and there has now been a request for a HTTPbis session during the meeting.

I'm looking forward to this! Hopefully it'll bring some fun talks on tech we care about, but also meeting cool people in real life that I never met before.

Stockholm

Oh, and am I the only one who can't find the dates anywhere on ietf75.se?

Not social enough

There's this concept that's very popular these days. Social networking web sites. I've always been intrigued by the six degrees of separation idea so I joined Facebook and I've given it a try. Result: yawn.

Of course I realize everything depends on who you are, how your social network works and so on, but for me the Facebook experiment has only proven to me what I already suspected: I'm not "social enough" to care about all my friends' teeny weeny little issues and expressions. I don't have many friend added (35 at this particular moment) but already at this low number I get terribly uncomfortable after reading too much personal goings-on. And I'm not interested in everyones' top-lists, what IKEA furniture they would be or which of the characters in the Muppet Show they resemble the most. I'm not going to use Facebook much until something changes.

Twitter is another one of the more trendy sites and services. This is very chaotic and most of the stuff posted there is utter crap. But there are some interesting people to follow and I do my best at following the tradition and contribute with my junk: My Twitter feed. More seriously I kind of use and view twitter as chatter around the coffee machine at a virtual office. You can select who to listen to. You can say whatever you feel like and the ones who might care could be reading it... The good part - for me of course - being that I can stay all geeky and techy and avoid that facebookish stuff I don't like. Oh, and if you're a friend in this manner, do tell me so that I can follow you!

LinkedIn is different. Here's a site with a different goal and perspective, and keeping in touch with people I've been involved with professionally is a totally different matter. This makes a lot of sense to me, and it's actually proven to pay off - several times. I believe me being a contract developer of course also make me value having a large network to reach out to so that I keep getting myself interesting assignments on a regular basis! My LinkedIn page.

Snaxx 19

In an attempt at making something social, to actually meet up with real-life physical people buHaxx!t yet avoid common trivial subjects and only stay on-topic with technology, computing, work, beer and things related to that, we're gathering at the next Snaxx on november 20th somewhere in Stockholm city Sweden. The exact location has yet to be decided.

If you're into technology, open source, good ales, talking about work on your spare time or possibly all of that at once - then you might just be one of us.

Welcome!

curl 7.18.2 and lunch

Just minutes ago I uploaded the curl and libcurl 7.18.2 package to the curl site. There are a few new changes that people might just like, but most importantly there are many bug fixes.

And by a happy coincidence, a bunch of #curl visitors (the irc channel on freenode) are going to meet up for lunch on tuesday next week (June 10th) in Stockholm, Sweden. If you're a curl hacker or curl fan and in the proximity that day, feel free to get in touch and join us!

Snaxx v18

Me and my fellows of the Haxx tribe have been arranging the Snaxx series of gatherings for about eight years by now and on this Wednesday the 19th of March 2008 it is time for the 18th meeting. We gather up in a dark pub in Stockholm to talk tech, work, open source and similar crap with similar-minded people while going through the beers of the place.

Since several of us in Haxx are pretty much into ales, porters and stouts we tend to prefer places with a large selection of that kind of beer, both on draft and on bottle.

We tend to be somewhere around 10 to 15 friends, but I really prefer if you mail me and tell me if you intend to come so that we can arrange properly to deal with the amount of people that show up. We're basically all friends and friends of friends.

So if you're a friend and in Stockholm, welcome!