Tag Archives: Mozilla

HTTP/2 in April 2016

On April 12 I had the pleasure of doing another talk in the Google Tech Talk series arranged in the Google Stockholm offices. I had given it the title “HTTP/2 is upon us, and here’s what you need to know about it.” in the invitation.

The room seated 70 persons but we had the amazing amount of over 300 people in the waiting line who unfortunately didn’t manage to get a seat. To those, and to anyone else who cares, here’s the video recording of the event.

If you’ve seen me talk about HTTP/2 before, you might notice that I’ve refreshed the material somewhat since before.

Two years of Mozilla

Today marks my two year anniversary of being employed by one of the greatest companies I’m aware of.

I get to work with open source all day, every day. I get to work for a company that isn’t driven by handing over profits to its owners for some sort of return on investment. I get to work on curl as part of my job. I get to work with internetworking, which is awesomely fun, hard, thrilling and hair-tearing all at once. I get to work with protocol standards like within the IETF and my employer can let me go to meetings. In the struggle for good, against evil and for the users of the world, I think I’m on the right side. For users, for privacy, for openness, for inclusiveness. I feel I’m a mozillian now.

So what did I achieve during my first two years with the dinosaur logo company? Not nearly enough of what I’ve wanted or possibly initially thought I would. I’ve faced a lot of tough bugs and hard challenges and I’ve landed and backed out changes all through-out this period. But I like to think that it is a net gain and even when running head first into a wall, that can be educational and we can learn from it and then when we take a few steps back and race forwards again we can use that knowledge and make better decision for the future.

Future you say? Yeah, I’m heading on in the same style, without raising my focus point very much and continuously looking for my next thing very close in time. I grab issues to work on with as little foresight as possible but I completely assume they will continue to be tough nuts to crack and there will be new networking issues to conquer going forward as well. I’ll keep working on open source, open standards and a better internet for users. I really enjoy working for Mozilla!

Mozilla dinosaur head logo

This post was not bought

coinsAt times I post blog articles that get the view counter go up to and beyond 50,000 views. This puts me in a position where I get offers from companies to mention them or to “cooperate” on further blog posts that would somehow push their agenda or businesses.

I also get the more simple offers of adding random ads or “text only information” on specific individual pages on my sites that some SEO person out there figured out could potentially attract audience that search for specific terms.

I’ve even gotten offers from a company to sell off my server logs. Allegedly to help them work on anti-fraud so possibly for a good cause, but still…

This is by no counts a “big” blog or site, yet I get a steady stream of individuals and companies offering me money to give up a piece of my soul. I can only imagine what more popular sites get and it is clear that someone with a less strict standpoint than mine could easily make an extra income that way.

I turn down all those examples of “easy money”.

I want to be able to look you, my dear readers, straight in the eyes when I say that what’s written here are my own words and the opinions revealed are my own – even if of course you may not agree with me and I may do mistakes and be completely wrong at times or even many times. You can rest assured that I did the mistakes on my own and I was not paid by anyone to do them.

I’ve also removed ads from most of my sites and I don’t run external analytic scripts, minimizing the privacy intrusions and optimizing the contents: the stuff downloaded from my sites are what your browser needs to render the page. Not heaps of useless crap to show ads or to help anyone track you (in order to show more targeted ads).

I don’t judge others’ actions based on how I decide to run my blog. I’m in a fortunate position to take this stand, I realize that.

Still biased of course

This all said, I’m still employed by a company (Mozilla) that pays my salary and I work on several projects that are dear to me so of course I will show bias to some subjects. I don’t claim to have an objective view on things and I don’t even try to have that. When I write posts here, they come colored by my background and by what I am.

A third day of HTTP Workshopping

I’ve met a bunch of new faces and friends here at the HTTP Workshop in Münster. Several who I’ve only seen or chatted with online before and some that I never interacted with until now. Pretty awesome really.

Out of the almost forty HTTP fanatics present at this workshop, five persons are from Google, four from Mozilla (including myself) and Akamai has three employees here. Those are the top-3 companies. There are a few others with 2 representatives but most people here are the only guys from their company. Yes they are all guys. We are all guys. The male dominance at this event is really extreme and we’ve discussed this sad circumstance during breaks and it hasn’t gone unnoticed.

This particular day started out grand with Eric Rescorla (of Mozilla) talking about HTTP Security in his marvelous high-speed style. Lots of talk about how how the HTTPS usage is right now on  the web, HTTPS trends, TLS 1.3 details and when it is coming and we got into a lot of talk about how HTTP deprecation and what can and cannot be done etc.

Next up was a presentation about HTTP Privacy and Anonymity by Mike Perry (from the Tor project) about lots of aspects of what the Tor guys consider regarding fingerprinting, correlation, network side-channels and similar things that can be used to attempt to track user or usage over the Tor network. We got into details about what recent protocols like HTTP/2 and QUIC “leak” or open up for fingerprinting and what (if anything) can or could be done to mitigate the effects.

Evolving HTTP Header Fields by Julian Reschke (of Green Bytes) then followed, discussing all the variations of header syntax that we have in HTTP and how it really is not possible to write a generic parser that can handle them, with a suggestion on how to unify this and introduce a common format for future new headers. Julian’s suggestion to use JSON for this ignited a discussion about header formats in general and what should or could be done for HTTP/3 and if keeping support for the old formats is necessary or not going forward. No real consensus was reached.

Willy Tarreau (from HAProxy) then took us into the world of HTTP Infrastructure scaling and Load balancing, and showed us on the microsecond level how fast a load balancer can be, how much extra work adding HTTPS can mean and then ending with a couple suggestions of what he thinks could’ve helped his scenario. That then turned into a general discussion and network architecture brainstorm on what can be done, how it could be improved and what TLS and other protocols could possibly be do to aid. Cramming out every possible gigabit out of load balancers certainly is a challange.

Talking about cramming bits, Kazuho Oku got to show the final slides when he showed how he’s managed to get his picohttpparser to parse HTTP/1 headers at a speed that is only slightly slower than strlen() – including a raw dump of the x86 assembler the code is turned into by a compiler. What could possibly be a better way to end a day full of protocol geekery?

Google graciously sponsored the team dinner in the evening at a Peruvian place in the town! Yet another fully packed day has ended.

I’ll top off today’s summary with a picture of the gift Mark Nottingham (who’s herding us through these days) was handing out today to make us stay keen and alert (Mark pointed out to me that this was a gift from one of our Japanese friends here):

kitkat

daniel weekly

daniel weekly screenshot

My series of weekly videos, in lack of a better name called daniel weekly, reached episode 35 today. I’m celebrating this fact by also adding an RSS-feed for those of you who prefer to listen to me in an audio-only version.

As an avid podcast listener myself, I can certainly see how this will be a better fit to some. Most of these videos are just me talking anyway so losing the visual shouldn’t be much of a problem.

A typical episode

I talk about what I work on in my open source projects, which means a lot of curl stuff and occasional stuff from my work on Firefox for Mozilla. I also tend to mention events I attend and HTTP/networking developments I find interesting and grab my attention. Lots of HTTP/2 talk for example. I only ever express my own personal opinions.

It is generally an extremely geeky and technical video series.

Every week I mention a (curl) “bug of the week” that allows me to joke or rant about the bug in question or just mention what it is about. In episode 31 I started my “command line options of the week” series in which I explain one or a few curl command line options with some amount of detail. There are over 170 options so the series is bound to continue for a while. I’ve explained ten options so far.

I’ve set a limit for myself and I make an effort to keep the episodes shorter than 20 minutes. I’ve not succeed every time.

Analytics

The 35 episodes have been viewed over 17,000 times in total. Episode two is the most watched individual one with almost 1,500 views.

Right now, my channel has 190 subscribers.

The top-3 countries that watch my videos: USA, Sweden and UK.

Share of viewers that are female: 3.7%

My talks at FOSDEM 2015

fosdem

Sunday 13:00, embedded room (Lameere)

Tile: Internet all the things – using curl in your device

Embedded devices are very often network connected these days. Network connected embedded devices often need to transfer data to and from them as clients, using one or more of the popular internet protocols.

libcurl is the world’s most used and most popular internet transfer library, already used in every imaginable sort of embedded device out there. How did this happen and how do you use libcurl to transfer data to or from your device?

Note that this talk was originally scheduled to be at a different time!

Sunday, 09:00 Mozilla room (UD2.218A)

Title: HTTP/2 right now

HTTP/2 is the new version of the web’s most important and used protocol. Version 2 is due to be out very soon after FOSDEM and I want to inform the audience about what’s going on with the protocol, why it matters to most web developers and users and not the last what its status is at the time of FOSDEM.

My first year at Mozilla

January 13th 2014 I started my fiMozilla dinosaur head logorst day at Mozilla. One year ago exactly today.

It still feels like it was just a very short while ago and I keep having this sense of being a beginner at the company, in the source tree and all over.

One year of networking code work that really at least during periods has not progressed as quickly as I would’ve wished for, and I’ve had some really hair-tearing problems and challenges that have taken me sweat and tears to get through. But I am getting through and I’m enjoying every (oh well, let’s say almost every) moment.

During the year I’ve had the chance to meetup with my team mates twice (in Paris and in Portland) and I’ve managed to attend one IETF (in London) and two special HTTP2 design meetings (in London and NYC).

openhub.net counts 47 commits by me in Firefox and that feels like counting high. bugzilla has tracked activity by me in 107 bug reports through the year.

I’ve barely started. I’ll spend the next year as well improving Firefox networking, hopefully with a higher turnout this year. (I don’t mean to make this sound as if Firefox networking is just me, I’m just speaking for my particular part of the networking team and effort and I let the others speak for themselves!)

Onwards and upwards!

FOSS them students

On October 16th, I visited DSV at Stockholm University where I had the pleasure of holding a talk and discussion with students (and a few teachers) under the topic Contribute to Open Source. Around 30 persons attended.

Here are the slides I use, as usual possibly not perfectly telling stand-alone without the talk but there was no recording made and I talked in Swedish anyway…

My home setup

I work in my home office which is upstairs in my house, perhaps 20 steps from my kitchen and the coffee refill. I have a largish desk with room for a number of computers. The photo below shows the three meter beauty. My two kids have their two machines on the left side while I use the right side of it for my desktop and laptop.

Daniel's home office

Many computers

The kids use my old desktop computer with a 20″ Dell screen and my old 15.6″ dual-core Asus laptop. My wife has her laptop downstairs and we have a permanent computer installed underneath the TV for media (an Asus VivoPC).

My desktop computer

I’m primarily developing C and C++ code and I’m frequently compiling rather large projects – repeatedly. I use a desktop machine for my ordinary development, equipped with a fairly powerful 3.5GHz quad-core Core-I7 CPU, I have my OS, my home dir and all source code put on an SSD. I have a larger HDD for larger and slower content. With ccache and friends, this baby can build Firefox really fast. I put my machine together from parts myself as I couldn’t find a suitable one focused on horse power but yet a “normal” 2D graphics card that works Fractal Designfine with Linux. I use a Radeon HD 5450 based ASUS card, which works fine with fully open source drivers.

I have two basic 24 inch LCD monitors (Benq and Dell) both using 1920×1200 resolution. I like having lots of windows up, nothing runs full-screen. I use KDE as desktop and I edit everything in Emacs. Firefox is my primary browser. I don’t shut down this machine, it runs a few simple servers for private purposes.

My machines (and my kids’) all run Debian Linux, typically of the unstable flavor allowing me to get new code reasonably fast.

Func KB-460 keyboardMy desktop keyboard is a Func KB-460, mechanical keyboard with some funky extra candy such as red backlight and two USB ports. Both my keyboard and my mouse are wired, not wireless, to take away the need for batteries or recharging etc in this environment. My mouse is a basic and old Logitech MX 310.

I have a crufty old USB headset with a mic, that works fine for hangouts and listening to music when the rest of the family is home. I have Logitech webcam thing sitting on the screen too, but I hardly ever use it for anything.

When on the move

I need to sometimes move around and work from other places. Going to conferences or even our regular Mozilla work weeks. Hence I also have a laptop that is powerful enough to build Firefox is a sane amount of time. I have Lenovo Thinkpad w540a Lenovo Thinkpad W540 with a 2.7GHz quad-core Core-I7, 16GB of RAM and 512GB of SSD. It has the most annoying touch pad on it. I don’t’ like that it doesn’t have the explicit buttons so for example both-clicking (to simulate a middle-click) like when pasting text in X11 is virtually impossible.

On this machine I also run a VM with win7 installed and associated development environment so I can build and debug Firefox for Windows on it.

I have a second portable. A small and lightweight netbook, an Eeepc S101, 10.1″ that I’ve been using when I go and just do presentations at places but recently I’ve started to simply use my primary laptop even for those occasions – primarily because it is too slow to do anything else on.

I do video conferences a couple of times a week and we use Vidyo for that. Its Linux client is shaky to say the least, so I tend to use my Nexus 7 tablet for it since the Vidyo app at least works decently on that. It also allows me to quite easily change location when it turns necessary, which it sometimes does since my meetings tend to occur in the evenings and then there’s also varying amounts of “family activities” going on!

Backup

For backup, I have a Synology NAS equipped with 2TB of disk in a RAIDSynology DS211j stashed downstairs, on the wired in-house gigabit Ethernet. I run an rsync job every night that syncs the important stuff to the NAS and I run a second rsync that also mirrors relevant data over to a friends house just in case something terribly bad would go down. My NAS backup has already saved me really good at least once.

Printer

HP Officejet 8500ANext to the NAS downstairs is the house printer, also attached to the gigabit even if it has a wifi interface of its own. I just like increasing reliability to have the “fixed services” in the house on wired network.

The printer also has scanning capability which actually has come handy several times. The thing works nicely from my Linux machines as well as my wife’s windows laptop.

Internet

fiber cableI have fiber going directly into my house. It is still “just” a 100/100 connection in the other end of the fiber since at the time I installed this they didn’t yet have equipment to deliver beyond 100 megabit in my area. I’m sure I’ll upgrade this to something more impressive in the future but this is a pretty snappy connection already. I also have just a few milliseconds latency to my primary servers.

Having the fast uplink is perfect for doing good remote backups.

Router  and wifi

dlink DIR 635I have a lowly D-Link DIR 635 router and wifi access point providing wifi for the 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands and gigabit speed on the wired side. It was dead cheap it just works. It NATs my traffic and port forwards some ports through to my desktop machine.

The router itself can also update the dyndns info which ultimately allows me to use a fixed name to my home machine even without a fixed ip.

Frequent Wifi users in the household include my wife’s laptop, the TV computer and all our phones and tablets.

Telephony

Ping Communication Voice Catcher 201EWhen I installed the fiber I gave up the copper connection to my home and since then I use IP telephony for the “land line”. Basically a little box that translates IP to old phone tech and I keep using my old DECT phone. We basically only have our parents that still call this number and it has been useful to have the kids use this for outgoing calls up until they’ve gotten their own mobile phones to use.

It doesn’t cost very much, but the usage is dropping over time so I guess we’ll just give it up one of these days.

Mobile phones and tablets

I have a Nexus 5 as my daily phone. I also have a Nexus 7 and Nexus 10 that tend to be used by the kids mostly.

I have two Firefox OS devices for development/work.