Tag Archives: podcast

On the GitHub ReadMe podcast

On May 17, I joined the Kathy and Brian, the hosts of the GitHub ReadMe podcast on a video meeting from my home and we had a chat. Mostly about my work on curl. Today the episode “aired”.

“curl: 25 years and 200 releases later”

You find it here. Also: Spotify. Apple podcasts. RSS feed.

curl is one of the most widely used software component in the world. It is over twenty years old and I am the founder and I still work as lead developer and head honcho. It works!

We talked about how I got into computers and open source in general. How curl started and about how it works to drive such a project, do releases and how to work on it as a full-time job. I am far from alone in this project – I’m just the captain of this ship with a large about of contributors onboard!

Photographs

As a part of the promotion for this episode, I was photographed by a professional outside of my house and nearby on a very lovely summer’s evening. In a southern suburb of Stockholm, Sweden. So, not only does the GitHub material feature not previously seen images of me, since I’ve been given the photos I can now use them for various things going forward. Like for when I do presentations and organizers ask for photos etc.

Photos of Daniel

The photos I’ve used most commonly up until this point are the ones a professional photographer took of me when I spoke at the Velocity conference in New York in 2015. Of course I’m eternally young, but for some reason those past six years are visible on me…

Podcasts

I’ve participated in some podcasts before. If my count is correct, this is the 19th time. See the whole list.

Credits

The new set of photos of me were shot by Evia Photos. One of them is used on the top of this page.

talking curl on changelog again

We have almost a tradition now, me and the duo Jerod and Adam of the Changelog podcast. We talk curl and related stuff every three years. Back in 2015 we started out in episode 153 and we did the second one in episode 299 in 2018.

Time flies and now we’re in 2021 and we did again “meet up” virtually and talked curl and related stuff for a while. curl is now 23 years old and I still run the project, a few things have changed since the last curl episode and I asked my twitter friends for what they wanted to know and I think we managed to get a whole bunch of such topics into the mix.

So, here’s the 2021 edition of Daniel on the Changelog podcast: episode 436.

The Changelog 436: Curl is a full-time job (and turns 23) – Listen on Changelog.com

Anyone want to bet if we’ll do it again in 2024?

Summing up My 2019

2019 is special in my heart. 2019 was different than many other years to me in several ways. It was a great year! This is what 2019 was to me.

curl and wolfSSL

I quit Mozilla last year and in the beginning of the year I could announce that I joined wolfSSL. For the first time in my life I could actually work with curl on my day job. As the project turned 21 I had spent somewhere in the neighborhood of 15,000 unpaid spare time hours on it and now I could finally do it “for real”. It’s huge.

Still working from home of course. My commute is still decent.

HTTP/3

Just in November 2018 the name HTTP/3 was set and this year has been all about getting it ready. I was proud to land and promote HTTP/3 in curl just before the first browser (Chrome) announced their support. The standard is still in progress and we hope to see it ship not too long into next year.

curl

Focusing on curl full time allows a different kind of focus. I’ve landed more commits in curl during 2019 than any other year going back all the way to 2005. We also reached 25,000 commits and 3,000 forks on github.

We’ve added HTTP/3, alt-svc, parallel transfers in the curl tool, tiny-curl, fixed hundreds of bugs and much, much more. Ten days before the end of the year, I’ve authored 57% (over 700) of all the commits done in curl during 2019.

We ran our curl up conference in Prague and it was awesome.

We also (re)started our own curl Bug Bounty in 2019 together with Hackerone and paid over 1000 USD in rewards through-out the year. It was so successful we’re determined to raise the amounts significantly going into 2020.

Public speaking

I’ve done 28 talks in six countries. A crazy amount in front of a lot of people.

In media

Dagens Nyheter published this awesome article on me. I’m now shown on the internetmuseum. I was interviewed and highlighted in Bloomberg Businessweek’s “Open Source Code Will Survive the Apocalypse in an Arctic Cave” and Owen William’s Medium post The Internet Relies on People Working for Free.

When Github had their Github Universe event in November and talked about their new sponsors program on stage (which I am part of, you can sponsor me) this huge quote of mine was shown on the big screen.

Maybe not media, but in no less than two Mr Robot episodes we could see curl commands in a TV show!

Podcasts

I’ve participated in three podcast episodes this year, all in Swedish. Kompilator episode 5 and episode 8, and Kodsnack episode 331.

Live-streamed

I’ve toyed with live-streamed programming and debugging sessions. That’s been a lot of fun and I hope to continue doing them on and off going forward as well. They also made me consider and get started on my libcurl video tutorial series. We’ll see where that will end…

2020?

I figure it can become another fun year too!

curl, http2 and quic on the Changelog

Three years ago I talked on a changelog episode about curl just having turned 17 years old and what it has meant for me etc.

Fast forward three years, 146 changelog episodes later and now curl has turned 20 years and I was again invited and joined the lovely hosts of the changelog podcast, Adam and Jerod.

Changelog episode 299

We talked curl of course but we also spent time talking about where HTTP/2 is and how QUIC is coming around and a little about why and how its UDP nature makes things a little different. If you’re into either curl or web transport, I hope you’ll find it interesting.

Yours truly on “kodsnack”

kodsnackKodsnack is a Swedish-speaking weekly podcast with a small team of web/app- developers discussing their experiences and thoughts on and around software development.

I was invited to participate a week ago or so, and I had a great time. Not surprisingly, the topics at hand moved a lot around curl, Firefox and HTTP/2. The recorded episode has now gone live, today.

You can find kodsnack episode 120 here, and again, it is all Swedish.

daniel weekly

daniel weekly screenshot

My series of weekly videos, in lack of a better name called daniel weekly, reached episode 35 today. I’m celebrating this fact by also adding an RSS-feed for those of you who prefer to listen to me in an audio-only version.

As an avid podcast listener myself, I can certainly see how this will be a better fit to some. Most of these videos are just me talking anyway so losing the visual shouldn’t be much of a problem.

A typical episode

I talk about what I work on in my open source projects, which means a lot of curl stuff and occasional stuff from my work on Firefox for Mozilla. I also tend to mention events I attend and HTTP/networking developments I find interesting and grab my attention. Lots of HTTP/2 talk for example. I only ever express my own personal opinions.

It is generally an extremely geeky and technical video series.

Every week I mention a (curl) “bug of the week” that allows me to joke or rant about the bug in question or just mention what it is about. In episode 31 I started my “command line options of the week” series in which I explain one or a few curl command line options with some amount of detail. There are over 170 options so the series is bound to continue for a while. I’ve explained ten options so far.

I’ve set a limit for myself and I make an effort to keep the episodes shorter than 20 minutes. I’ve not succeed every time.

Analytics

The 35 episodes have been viewed over 17,000 times in total. Episode two is the most watched individual one with almost 1,500 views.

Right now, my channel has 190 subscribers.

The top-3 countries that watch my videos: USA, Sweden and UK.

Share of viewers that are female: 3.7%

talking curl on the changelog

The changelog is the name of a weekly podcast on which the hosts discuss open source and stuff.

Last Friday I was invited to participate and I joined hosts Adam and Jerod for an hour long episode about curl. It all started as a response to my post on curl 17 years, so we really got into how things started out and how curl has developed through the years, how much time I’ve spent on it and if I could mention a really great moment in time that stood out over the years?

They day before, they released the little separate teaser we made about about the little known –remote-name-all command line option that basically makes curl default to do -O on all given URLs.

The full length episode can be experienced in all its glory here: https://changelog.com/153/