Tag Archives: QUIC

curl wants to QUIC

The interesting Google transfer protocol that is known as QUIC is being passed through the IETF grinding machines to hopefully end up with a proper "spec" that has been reviewed and agreed to by many peers and that will end up being a protocol that is thoroughly documented with a lot of protocol people's consensus. Follow the IETF QUIC mailing list for all the action.

I'd like us to join the fun

Similarly to how we implemented HTTP/2 support early on for curl, I would like us to get "on the bandwagon" early for QUIC to be able to both aid the protocol development and serve as a testing tool for both the protocol and the server implementations but then also of course to get us a solid implementation for users who'd like a proper QUIC capable client for data transfers.

implementations

The current version (made entirely by Google and not the output of the work they're now doing on it within the IETF) of the QUIC protocol is already being widely used as Chrome speaks it with Google's services in preference to HTTP/2 and other protocol options. There exist only a few other implementations of QUIC outside of the official ones Google offers as open source. Caddy offers a separate server implementation for example.

the Google code base

For curl's sake, it can't use the Google code as a basis for a QUIC implementation since it is C++ and code used within the Chrome browser is really too entangled with the browser and its particular environment to become very good when converted into a library. There's a libquic project doing exactly this.

for curl and others

The ideal way to implement QUIC for curl would be to create "nghttp2" alternative that does QUIC. An ngquic if you will! A library that handles the low level protocol fiddling, the binary framing etc. Done that way, a QUIC library could be used by more projects who'd like QUIC support and all people who'd like to see this protocol supported in those tools and libraries could join in and make it happen. Such a library would need to be written in plain C and be suitably licensed for it to be really interesting for curl use.

a needed QUIC library

I'm hoping my post here will inspire someone to get such a project going. I will not hesitate to join in and help it get somewhere! I haven't started such a project myself because I think I already have enough projects on my plate so I fear I wouldn't be a good leader or maintainer of a project like this. But of course, if nobody else will do it I will do it myself eventually. If I can think of a good name for it.

some wishes for such a library

  • Written in C, to offer the same level of portability as curl itself and to allow it to get used as extensions by other languages etc
  • FOSS-licensed suitably
  • It should preferably not "own" the socket but also work in-memory and to allow applications to do many parallel connections etc.
  • Non-blocking. It shouldn't wait for things on its own but let the application do that.
  • Should probably offer both client and server functionality for maximum use.
  • What else?

HTTP/2 in April 2016

On April 12 I had the pleasure of doing another talk in the Google Tech Talk series arranged in the Google Stockholm offices. I had given it the title "HTTP/2 is upon us, and here's what you need to know about it." in the invitation.

The room seated 70 persons but we had the amazing amount of over 300 people in the waiting line who unfortunately didn't manage to get a seat. To those, and to anyone else who cares, here's the video recording of the event.

If you've seen me talk about HTTP/2 before, you might notice that I've refreshed the material somewhat since before.

HTTP/2 adoption, end of 2015

http2 front imageWhen I asked my surrounding in March 2015 to guess the expected HTTP/2 adoption by now, we as a group ended up with about 10%. OK, the question was vaguely phrased and what does it really mean? Let's take a look at some aspects of where we are now.

Perhaps the biggest flaw in the question was that it didn't specify HTTPS. All the browsers of today only implement HTTP/2 over HTTPS so of course if every HTTPS site in the world would support HTTP/2 that would still be far away from all the HTTP requests. Admittedly, browsers aren't the only HTTP clients...

During the fall of 2015, both nginx and Apache shipped release versions with HTTP/2 support. nginx made it slightly harder for people by forcing users to select either SPDY or HTTP/2 (which was a technical choice done by them, not really enforced by the protocols) and also still telling users that SPDY is the safer choice.

Let's Encrypt's finally launching their public beta in the early December also helps HTTP/2 by removing one of the most annoying HTTPS obstacles: the cost and manual administration of server certs.

Amount of Firefox responses

This is the easiest metric since Mozilla offers public access to the metric data. It is skewed since it is opt-in data and we know that certain kinds of users are less likely to enable this (if you're more privacy aware or if you're using it in enterprise environments for example). This also then measures the share by volume of requests; making the popular sites get more weight.

Firefox 43 counts no less than 22% of all HTTP responses as HTTP/2 (based on data from Dec 8 to Dec 16, 2015).

Out of all HTTP traffic Firefox 43 generates, about 63% is HTTPS which then makes almost 35% of all Firefox HTTPS requests are HTTP/2!

Firefox 43 is also negotiating HTTP/2 four times as often as it ends up with SPDY.

Amount of browser traffic

One estimate of how large share of browsers that supports HTTP/2 is the caniuse.com number. Roughly 70% on a global level. Another metric is the one published by KeyCDN at the end of October 2015. When they enabled HTTP/2 by default for their HTTPS customers world wide, the average number of users negotiating HTTP/2 turned out to be 51%. More than half!

Cloudflare however, claims the share of supported browsers are at a mere 26%. That's a really big difference and I personally don't buy their numbers as they're way too negative and give some popular browsers very small market share. For example: Chrome 41 - 49 at a mere 15% of the world market, really?

I think the key is rather that it all boils down to what you measure - as always.

Amount of the top-sites in the world

Netcraft bundles SPDY with HTTP/2 in their October report, but it says that "29% of SSL sites within the thousand most popular sites currently support SPDY or HTTP/2, while 8% of those within the top million sites do." (note the "of SSL sites" in there)

That's now slightly old data that came out almost exactly when Apache first release its HTTP/2 support in a public release and Nginx hadn't even had it for a full month yet.

Facebook eventually enabled HTTP/2 in November 2015.

Amount of "regular" sites

There's still no ideal service that scans a larger portion of the Internet to measure adoption level. The httparchive.org site is about to change to a chrome-based spider (from IE) and once that goes live I hope that we will get better data.

W3Tech's report says 2.5% of web sites in early December - less than SPDY!

I like how isthewebhttp2yet.com looks so far and I've provided them with my personal opinions and feedback on what I think they should do to make that the preferred site for this sort of data.

Using the shodan search engine, we could see that mid December 2015 there were about 115,000 servers on the Internet using HTTP/2.  That's 20,000 (~24%) more than isthewebhttp2yet site says. It doesn't really show percentages there, but it could be interpreted to say that slightly over 6% of HTTP/1.1 sites also support HTTP/2.

On Dec 3rd 2015, Cloudflare enabled HTTP/2 for all its customers and they claimed they doubled the number of HTTP/2 servers on the net in that single move. (The shodan numbers seem to disagree with that statement.)

Amount of system lib support

iOS 9 supports HTTP/2 in its native HTTP library. That's so far the leader of HTTP/2 in system libraries department. Does Mac OS X have something similar?

I had expected Window's wininet or other HTTP libs to be up there as well but I can't find any details online about it. I hear the Android HTTP libs are not up to snuff either but since okhttp is now part of Android to some extent, I guess proper HTTP/2 in Android is not too far away?

Amount of HTTP API support

I hear very little about HTTP API providers accepting HTTP/2 in addition or even instead of HTTP/1.1. My perception is that this is basically not happening at all yet.

Next-gen experiments

If you're using a modern Chrome browser today against a Google service you're already (mostly) using QUIC instead of HTTP/2, thus you aren't really adding to the HTTP/2 client side numbers but you're also not adding to the HTTP/1.1 numbers.

QUIC and other QUIC-like (UDP-based with the entire stack in user space) protocols are destined to grow and get used even more as we go forward. I'm convinced of this.

Conclusion

Everyone was right! It is mostly a matter of what you meant and how to measure it.

Future

Recall the words on the Chromium blog: "We plan to remove support for SPDY in early 2016". For Firefox we haven't said anything that absolute, but I doubt that Firefox will support SPDY for very long after Chrome drops it.

HTTP Workshop, second day

All 37 of us gathered again on the 3rd floor in the Factory hotel here in Münster. Day two of the HTTP Workshop.

Jana Iyengar (from Google) kicked off this morning with his presentations on HTTP and the Transport Layer and QUIC. Very interesting area if you ask me - if you're interested in this, you really should check out the video recording from the barbof they did on this topic in the recent Prague IETF. It is clear that a team with dedication, a clear use-case, a fearless approach to not necessarily maintaining "layers" and a handy control of widely used servers and clients can do funky experiments with new transport protocols.

I think there was general agreement with Jana's statement that "Engagement with the transport community is critical" for us to really be able to bring better web protocols now and in the future. Jana's excellent presentations were interrupted a countless number of times with questions, elaborations, concerns and sub-topics from attendees.

Gaetano Carlucci followed up with a presentation of their QUIC evaluations, showing how it performs under various situations like packet loss etc in comparison to HTTP/2. Lots of transport related discussions followed.

We rounded off the afternoon with a walk through the city (the rain stopped just minutes before we took off) to the town center where we tried some of the local beers while arguing their individual qualities. We then took off in separate directions and had dinner in smaller groups across the city.

snackstation